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Why do you feel angry when hungry?

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angry hungry

New York, June 12: Ever experienced anger when hunger pangs hit you? According to research, it may be due to a complicated emotional response involving an interplay of biology, personality and environmental cues.

The study showed that hungry individuals reported greater unpleasant emotions like feeling stressed and hateful when they were not explicitly focused on their own emotions.

“We all know that hunger can sometimes affect our emotions and perceptions of the world around us, but it’s only recently that the expression hangry, meaning bad-tempered or irritable because of hunger, was accepted by the Oxford Dictionary,” said lead author Jennifer MacCormack from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US.

In a lab experiment, published in the journal Emotion, involving 200 university students, the team asked the participants to either to fast or eat beforehand and then asked them to complete a tedious exercise on a computer that was programmed to crash without their knowledge. They were also blamed for the crash.

After this, they answered a questionnaire which showed that hungry participants thought that the researcher conducting the experiment was more judgmental or harsh.

Those who spent time thinking about their emotions, even when hungry, did not report these shifts in emotions or social perceptions, proving the importance of awareness.

“We find that feeling hangry happens when you feel unpleasantness due to hunger but interpret those feelings as strong emotions about other people or the situation you’re in,” said co-author Kristen Lindquist from the varsity.

“Our bodies play a powerful role in shaping our moment-to-moment experiences, perceptions and behaviours — whether we are hungry versus full, tired versus rested or sick versus healthy,” MacCormack said.

IANS

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Lifestyle

Motorcyclist on a multi-nation anti-plastic mission

Abhimanyu Chakrovorthy, 31, has set off on a 10,000 km crowdfunded motorcycle expedition through India and five neighbouring Southeast Asian countries to spread awareness of its pernicious effects and to encourage people to shun its use.

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anti plastic campaign

New Delhi, June 20 (IANS) With India estimated to generate 25,000 tonnes of plastic waste every day, media professional Abhimanyu Chakrovorthy, 31, has set off on a 10,000 km crowdfunded motorcycle expedition through India and five neighbouring Southeast Asian countries to spread awareness of its pernicious effects and to encourage people to shun its use.

“I have always been environmentally conscious about issues such as climate change and wildlife, and I used to practice this concept of outdoor ethics called ‘Leave No Trace’ in the Himalayas where you pick up your own waste and dispose it off properly.

“I am also a motorcycle enthusiast who has toured quite extensively across India. So this presented a unique opportunity to merge my two passions: Motorcycling and addressing the menace of plastic pollution in Southeast Asia and India. Hence this trip from New Delhi, covering more than 10,000 km, travelling to Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Nepal to raise awareness on plastic pollution,” Chakrovorthy told IANS in an interview just before he set off.

How exactly will it work on the ground?

During the journey, through tie-ups with NGOs and schools in the five countries, he has planned beach and city clean-up initiatives and will conduct short sessions/presentations with them on the global scenario in plastic pollution and what India is doing to fight it.

“Through these workshops, I will share knowledge about India’s waste management system, and also learn from them their solutions to the plastic pollution problem. Some of these countries have taken affirmative action on plastic and I want to understand more of what and how they’re doing it. The focus of my work will be on reducing, reusing and recycling waste as much as possible. Through this trip, I plan to document plastic consumption in these countries and their waste management processes,” Chakrovorthy explained.

The planning, he said, had been quite a nightmare. For instance, he figured it would cost Rs 70,000 one way through Myanmar and at least Rs 80,000 one way through Thailand.

“At this stage, a friend told me about (crowdoutsourcing platform) Milaap. This presented some hope because I couldn’t bear the cost on my own. So I got down to work and prepared my statement of purpose over one week for the trip to be advertised on Milaap.

“The fundraiser is still live on the platform and I am hoping to raise some money through it. My target is Rs 3 lakh and till now I have reached just Rs 40,000 but I am hopeful my story will resonate with people and some funding comes through Milaap. I believe the momentum against plastic pollution is strong and through this trip I will highlight all the challenges that come with waste management in Southeast Asia and India,” Chakrovorthy explained.

What about the back-up for the journey?

“I am positive that Plan A will work out, because there’s still some time to raise funds (through the platform). I am also in talks with a few potential sponsors who might come on board to help me out with resources. However, the Plan B is to simply skip Nepal and put my bike on train from Imphal (on the return leg) to New Delhi in case I fall short of money. Other than this, I don’t see any other issue,” Chakrovorthy responded.

What of the future?

“In the near future, I will be organising few more clean-ups in association with embassies and institutions such as Delhi Civil Defence and Delhi Police focusing on communities and societies by asking them to moderate their consumption so that less waste ends up in our ever-increasing landfills,” Chakrovorthy concluded.

(Vishnu Makhijani can be contacted at [email protected] )

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Lifestyle

Treat your dad to some sweet delights on Father’s Day

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fathers day feature

Whip up some sugar free sweet delights and drinks for your father on Father’s Day on Sunday, suggest experts.

Chef Kunal Kapur and Sohan Singh, Technical Manager, South Asia, PureCircle, have listed a few simple recipes for you to try out:

* Badam Elaichi Shake

* Ingredients:

Milk – 3 cups

Almonds (peeled and chopped) – 1/2 cup

Honey – 1 tablespoon

Cardamom powder – 1/2 teaspoon

Saffron – 5 strands

Vanilla ice cream – 2 scoops (optional)

* Method: Mix all the ingredients and blend in a blender. Froth it up and serve chilled, garnished with almond flakes.

-*-

* Fruit Custard (Sweetened with Natural Sweetener Stevia)

* Ingredients:

Custard Powder – 1 tablespoon

Milk -250 ml

Cold milk – 1 tablespoon

Sugar free green -9.5 scoop

* Method: Combine custard powder and the cold milk in a small cup. Stir until smooth. Place custard mixture, sugar free green and remaining milk in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Stir constantly until custard comes to a boil and thickens. Simmer and stir for one minute.

Keep the custard in the fridge to cool before adding the fruits. Chop the fruits, once the custard has cooled add the fruits and mix well. Serve garnished with some more fruits and pomegranate arils

-*-

* Yogurt and Fruit Parfaits

* Ingredients:

Muesli -5 teaspoon

Yogurt -100 g

Mango slice – 2

Pomegranate – half cup

Walnut – 4 pieces

Almond – 2 pieces (broken)

Mint leaves- 2-4 leaves

Any other seasonal fruit

Sugar free green – 4 scoops

* Method: Take a glass mug or a long glass. Fill bottom of glass with muesli. In a separate bowl take curd and add sugar free green. Mix them well. Pour half of curd into the glass, and then add fruits. Pour remaining curd in glass and then add dry fruits, and few more fruit. Garnish with mint leaves.

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India

Eid Mubarak! Here’s all you need to know about Eid-ul-Fitr or Meethi Eid

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New Delhi, June 16: Muslims across the world are celebrating Eid ul-Fitr with much fervour and grandeur on Saturday. 

The festival of Eid marks the end of Ramzan, the holy month of fasting in the Islamic calendar when the Quran was first revealed to Prophet Muhammad. Eid marks the first day of the month of Shawwal.

Eid-ul-Fitr, which means ‘festival of breaking of the fast’, is celebrated when the new moon is sighted. Due to this, the festival is sometimes celebrated on different days in different parts of the world and the date varies from year to year.

people-offering-namaz- eid

Celebrations traditionally begin with Chand Raat, the evening before the day of Eid, when people go for Eid shopping. On the morning of Eid, worshippers get up before sunrise to offer Salat-ul-Fajr (daily prayers). After breakfast (since it is forbidden to fast on Eid), they offer prayers at mosques and often at burial grounds to pray for the salvation of departed family members.

Eid-celebrations-

Worshippers wear new clothes on Eid, visit their relatives and friends, and greet each other by saying Eid Mubarak. Sweets and desserts are prepared and distributed, with the chief delicacy being the sewayi – roasted vermicelli cooked in milk and garnished with dry fruits. Unlike Eid al-Adha (which focuses on meat delicacies), Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated with traditional desserts and is also called Meethi Ed.

Meethi-Seviyan eid

This time, the focus is largely on sweet preparations giving the festival its name – Meethi Eid. The month-long Iftar feasting is studded with rich, meaty delicacies. But the final day is all about starting anew, on a sweet note. “Throughout the holy month of fasting, the evening meal is usually very rich and meat dominated, once the Ramzan is closed, the following day is celebrated as Eid by eating something sweet the first thing in the morning. It also signifies starting your routine on a sweet note after a month of abstinence and praying,” shared Chef Osama Jalali, Masala Trail.

A major Indian festival, Eid is observed as a public holiday. It is celebrated with great fervour across the country and especially at major mosques like Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, Jama Masjid in New Delhi, Dargah Sharif in Ajmer, Hazratbal shrine in Srinagar and Taj Mahal Mosque in Agra.

Eid 2018 charminaar

Sweets and traditional desserts are also distributed and served among friends, family and to the needy as a gesture of sharing and partaking happiness and good luck. There is great emphasis on charity on this day. It is obligatory to donate to the poor and needy before offering prayers. The celebrations often go on for three days.

Eid Mubarak !!

WeforNews 

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