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Who’s treating employees well and who isn’t during COVID-19

When it comes to fast-food companies, a higher number find their behaviour poor rather than well- 48 percent compared to 37 percent.

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Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus WHO

New Delhi, June 20 : A study conducted among 931 working respondents in the country between 9th and 15th June 2020 by YouGuv yields some surprising results when it comes to employee satisfaction.

There is a huge gap between employees from different sectors, these numbers reveal the true story.

When looking at the various sectors, there are stark differences in the levels of satisfaction. Considering an average satisfaction level of 55 percent, the levels are noticeably higher among employees working in the Education (66 percent) sector, followed by IT & telecom (62 percent) and Construction companies (57 percent).

Professionals in Retail (55 percent) and Manufacturing sectors (55 percent) reported average levels of satisfaction, but those in Finance/ Accounts (48 percent) and Media/ Marketing/ Advertising (42 percent) showed lower degree of satisfaction than the others.

On the other hand, 23 percent of all respondents said their employer”s treatment was ”good” and only 19 percent rated their treatment as ”fair” or ”poor”. This proportion is considerably higher among those working in the Manufacturing and Retail industry (24 percent and 20 percent, respectively rating ”Fair” or ”Poor”).

Who didn”t fare to well leading to many disgruntled employees?

When it comes to fast-food companies, a higher number find their behaviour poor rather than well- 48 percent compared to 37 percent.

Ratings of poor response are much higher for sectors such as Holiday & Travel companies (53 percent), Leisure Companies (52 percent) and Airlines (51 percent), where a majority described the behaviour of these companies as poor.

With regard to companies who have lost most of their day-to-day business, four in ten Indians believe that despite the circumstances employees should be kept fully employed and fully paid (40 percent). More than a quarter (26 percent), however, said employees should have their pay cut until normal work resumes. A small minority feel if necessary, some employees should be laid off altogether from their jobs (12 percent) or should be furloughed (11 percent).

When it comes to government action to ensure companies are better suited to handle any future crises, close to half think the government should make companies release an annual statement about how they can deal with a future pandemic (48 percent), and should make them pay into a fund designed to provide protection in the future (46 percent).

When asked about the behaviour of various sectors within the economy in response to the pandemic, residents were more likely to say that most of the sectors have behaved well rather than poorly.

The Pharmaceuticals sector (83 percent) leads among businesses perceived to have responded well to the pandemic, followed by Utilities (79 percent), Banks (76 percent) and Technology sectors (75 percent).

36 percent feel companies should pay more to have better insurance against such events, and an equal number (36 percent) believe the company directors should be personally made more accountable for the business” ability to deal with such situations. Some (14 percent) feel that companies are not to blame, or already pay enough tax and have enough regulations.

Overall Indian employees are positive about how their employers have treated them during the COVID-19 pandemic, with 59 percent rating their company”s treatment of staff as ”excellent” (31 percent) or ”very good” (28 percent), says a research.

(IANSlife can be contacted at [email protected])

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Tesla plans cheaper $25,000 electric car within 3 years: Elon Musk

Musk also announced that as well as purchasing batteries from Panasonic and LG Chem.

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk

San Francisco, Sep 23 : Elon Musk has said that Tesla plans to produce an electric car with a price tag of $25,000 within the next three years.

The aim, said Musk on Battery Day on Tuesday, is to make Tesla electric cars more affordable for the masses.

“That will basically be on-par or slightly better than a comparable gasoline car. This has always been our dream to make an affordable electric car,” he said during the virtual presentation.

The cheapest Tesla Model 3 that made its debut in February 2019 currently costs $35,000. it offers a 350-km range, a top speed of 210 km per hour and acceleration from 0-100 km per hour in 5.6 seconds.

“Tesla says has only been made possible by shifting sales to an online-only platform and by winding down physical outlets,” reports ZDNet.

Tesla is known for the Model Y, Model S, Model X, and Model 3 product lines.

“For a lot of people, they want to buy a Tesla, but they simply don’t have the money. We could make the car infinitely desirable, but if someone does not have the money, they won’t buy it,” Musk said.

The Tesla CEO also announced the development of a new battery cell and a reduction in cell cost per kilowatt-hour.

The main announcement was Tesla’s new larger cylindrical cells. It was claimed the new batteries will provide five times more energy, six times more power and 16 per cent greater driving range.

“But the technology announced is likely to take years to implement. Tesla’s approach includes integrating the battery so that it forms part of the structure of the vehicle, thereby reducing the effective weight of the battery,” reports the BBC.

Musk also announced that as well as purchasing batteries from Panasonic and LG Chem.

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Israel reports 2,445 new Covid-19 cases; 193,374 in total

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israel coronavirus

Jerusalem, Sep 23 : Israel’s Ministry of Health reported 2,445 new Covid-19 cases on Tuesday, bringing the total confirmed cases to 193,374.

The total count of deaths from the coronavirus in Israel rose by 12 to 1,285, while the number of patients in serious condition rose from 653 to 668, out of 1,352 patients currently hospitalised, Xinhua news agency reported.

The number of recoveries in the country increased by 3,971 to 140,751, while the number of active Covid-19 cases stood at 51,338.

Earlier on Tuesday, the Israeli government approved a plan to expand the national economic safety net to deal with the pandemic’s impact.

“Expanding the plan will enable immediate economic assistance for businesses and wage-earners who are expected to be hurt by the current Covid-19 nationwide lockdown,” said a joint statement by the Prime Minister’s Office and Finance Ministry.

The expansion includes the lowering of damage threshold for businesses to receive fixed expenditure grants to 25 per cent, providing advances against the fixed expenditure grants, a comprehensive worker retention plan, and deferring the reduction in unemployment benefits.

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United States Covid deaths top 200,000 as questions linger over halting virus spread

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Coronavirus Death US

The US death toll from the coronavirus exceeded 200,000, as some guidelines and practices for stopping the disease’s spread have been called into question.

While the data compiled by Johns Hopkins University indicated that 52,000 new cases had been reported on Monday, some 21,800 of those new cases came from the release of backlogged data in Texas.

The US logged 36,695 new cases on Sunday, Johns Hopkins reported.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention caused uncertainty Monday when it removed from its website newly posted guidelines saying the coronavirus could be transmitted by tiny particles that linger in the air.

The agency said a draft version of proposed changes was posted in error.

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