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Where is Overtourism Leading Our Holiday Destinations to?

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When the rigours of daily life and the grind get too strenuous, nothing relaxes your mind, body and spirit like the perfect vacation, right? You can choose to soak up the sun and the sea on a beach, be one with nature in the hills and perhaps just indulge your senses at a historical destination.

Except when you arrive at your dream destination, it turns out to be a nightmare. It’s crowded beyond expectations, and the destination only compounds everything you hate about city life. It’s far from paradise. It has turned into an over-commercialized and overpopulated version of the place you loved. This is a disaster, a holiday-goers worst nightmare come true.

By Jay Kantawala, Founder of WIYO Travel said, “The tourism industry has grown at an exponential rate. So much so, that a lot more people are travelling now than they once used to. The emerging middle class has the means and the ability to visit more places now than ever before. And this has given rise to a very real fear dubbed ‘overtourism’.

The term ‘overtourism’ was coined last year and denotes the phase when far too many tourists travel to a destination. While primarily used in a negative context, there are two sides to the concept of overtourism. Let’s look at both the pros and cons of this phenomenon.

With more tourism, there are more opportunities for employment. It allows the people of any locality to earn a better living. Moreover, with more visitors, the economy of the destination benefits leading to better infrastructure and a better standard of living for residents. Ultimately, well-travelled tourists are found to be better adjusted and knowledgeable about the culture of various places. This eventually leads to a peaceful and harmonious world.

But then again, ‘overtourism’ also has its detriments. Residents in Barcelona and Venice have actually organized protests and made graffiti urging tourists return from whence they arrived. This is because overtourism can have an adverse effect in terms of jammed roads, littering, destruction of the ecology of the tourist destination and much more.

So how does one strike a balance between the pros and cons of this phenomenon? The change needs to stem from the tourist himself, who needs to make a very positive difference. While passing through a destination, he/she needs to be responsible so as to not cause an adverse effect on the destination, on the environment and on the residents of the place.

‘Overtourism’ was added to the dictionary when it became a problem for those affected by its menace. Perhaps in the times that follow, ‘responsible tourism’ or ‘sustainable tourism’ will be added to the dictionary as well.

Health

Exercise may reduce irregular heartbeat risk in obese people

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Atrial fibrillation is a condition that can make your heart race and put you at risk for stroke. But people who are obese are more prone to it and can reduce it if they exercise regularly.

According to a study, people with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 have a significantly higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation than the normal weight individuals.

“People who reported that they didn’t exercise at all had about double the risk of developing fibrillation when compared to those who were physically active and whose body weight was normal,” said co-author Lars Elnan Garnvik from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU).

“However, people who were obese but who exercised a lot limited the increase in risk to no more than approximately 50 per cent. This suggests that physical activity is good for limiting the increased risk of atrial fibrillation in obese people,” Garnvik added.

For the study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, the research team involved 43,602 men and women who participated in the study between 2006 and 2008.

“Physical activity and exercise reduce a lot of the known risk factors for atrial fibrillation, like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and chronic inflammation,” said co-author Lars Elnan Garnvik from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

“Physical activity can also improve a person’s fitness level, and we know that people in good shape have a reduced risk of heart failure,” Garnvik added.

IANS

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Lifestyle

How to make your room beautiful with wall art

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New Delhi, Aug 14 : A wall of the room exhibit most of the personality and adds little drama to life. They are really game-changers in current affairs of the lifestyle world which definitely demand the right choice at first place hence it is required to accurately choose pieces that will mesh with the existing space and helps to get a harmonious interior.

Sanjay Bafna, Senior General Manager – Design, RG Group, Anjali Jain, founder of Kala Drishti (NGO) and Nitin Aggarwal, Head- Design and Architecture, Gulshan Homz list down some points to consider while doing wall art.

* Blending of colours: Choosing the colour palette is one of the prominent and toughest decisions to take as it flaunt most of it. The selection of colour should be definitely based on the existing furniture, the type and placement of the room and to whom the room belongs to. For example: If the room belongs to old member of the house then the light colours would be preferred unlike for kids and adult the bright colours would be more likeable.

* Determine the focal point: A great piece of wall art works as an icing on the cake if it get its right place. The space which instantly draws the eye and gives the viewer a sense of satisfaction adds more spice to the room. The creative hanging in front the eyes complements the room and ones day.

* Proportionate size: While choosing a piece of wall art for the space, the most important consideration is size. Too small artwork would get dwarfed underneath the furniture or other surrounding and too big will look as it is spilling over. The exposure of the wall should be measured accurately and in that proportion the wall art should be decided and designed.

* Sense of texture: Insightful texture can add much need visual weight to the interiors which will help in determine the tone of the room or how it feels. The variety of different mediums helps in bringing a varying sense of texture into the space. It has been witnessed that rough textures are more likely to make a space feel intimate and grounded while smooth textures bring a sleeker more aloof tone to the room.

* Check what the wall demands: Wall art is that finishing element that can help pull a space together and make it feel complete. There are various types of wall art which are feasible and within the budget. One of them is wall shelves which helps to decorate the room and also useful in placement of things. They are selected as per the size of room and wall. The other which aids the beauty of the room are paintings and stickers, it adds some drama to ones room and helps in depicting ones personality.

IANS

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This Independence Day, savour famous delicacies from different regions

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New Delhi, Aug 14: There is no denying the fact that Indian food is as vast as its culture and lifestyle. The taste buds of Indians span beyond their regions as every part has its own speciality. So why not try some of the famous delicacies from different regions this Independence Day.

Here is a list of some famous Indian delicacies from the different regions to savour this Independence Day, penned down by Yogesh Ghorpade, CEO and Founder, Uplodefoodie and Purba Kalita, Co-Founder of SaleBhai.

* Modur Pulav (Kashmir): A delicious aromatic rice dish famous in Valley of Kashmir, Modur Pulav is sweet, and has saffron as its primary colour, the top colour in our tiranga. It has spices, mix of dry fruits, loads of ghee, and fruits like apples, pomegranate and pineapples. It can also be relished with with paneer masala gravy and tangy Indian pickles.

* Modak (Maharashtra): Modak is an Indian sweet dish popular in Maharashtra mainly. Filled with coconut and jaggery, it is served as a Prasad in front of Lord Ganesha during Ganesh Chaturthi. It can be fried or steamed but it is mostly preferred steamed hot in ghee by Indians.

* Murukku (Tamil Nadu and Kerala): Considered as one of the best tea-time snacks, Murukku is made from rice flour and urad dal flour. It is an integral part of the South Indian cuisine and is tasty and relatively easy to prepare. One can easily make these in a large batch and enjoy leisurely whenever there is a craving for a quick snack.

* Narikol (Assam): Coconuts have significance for the Hindus and are nutritious indeed. Made from tender coconut rolled into balls, Narikol is one of the most famous dishes in Assam and is especially seen a lot around Bihu. This can also be preserved for more than a week if kept in a dry air-tight container.

* Sarson Da Saag (Punjab and Haryana): One of the most popular Punjabi vegetarian delicacies is makke ki roti with sarson da saag. This famous combination is a flat-bread and mustard leaves gravy, prepared with different spices. Wash it down with a cool and refreshing glass of lassi.

* Mysore Pak (Karnataka): Mysore Pak is a South Indian dessert prepared with generous amounts of sugar, ghee, fragrant cardamom, and gram flour. It was first whipped up in the royal kitchen of the Mysore Palace and till date, it is considered the king of sweets down south.

* Rosogulla (West Bengal): The battle between West Bengal and Odisha claiming rosogolla as their own might have ended in the former’s favour, but none of that bitterness has trickled into the treat itself – the spongy, sweet, and delicious mithai that is a must in every East Indian celebration.

* Ghevar (Rajasthan): Rajasthani cuisine is marked by its savory dishes and succulent desserts. Among the latter, ghevar is probably the most drool worthy. This disc-shaped cake is made with mawa, ghee, and malai ghewar.

IANS

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