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When Gandhi inspired a generation of freedom-fighters

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Bengaluru, Sep 30 : As the Father of the Nation and a hope for thousands of people during the first half of the 20th century, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) was a source of inspiration for a generation of freedom-fighters to leave homes, studies, jobs and give up a cosy life to free India from the colonial yoke, fondly recalled 102-year-old freedom fighter Harohalli Srinivasaiah Doreswamy, marking the Sesquicentennial of the Mahatma.

“I had the honour and privilege of seeing and meeting Gandhiji for a couple of times in Bengaluru during the freedom struggle and joined his non-violent movement to free the country from the imperial rulers under his guidance and phenomenal leadership,” a Spartan Doreswamy told IANS in an exclusive interview here.

Going down the memory lane, Doreswamy said he met Gandhiji for the first time in mid-1930s when he was a teenager at a state-run guest house in Bengaluru where he was staying to recuperate from a bout of illness at the behest of then Mysuru Maharaja Nalvadi Krishnaraja Wodeyar.

“Though Gandhiji visited the city a couple of times earlier on return from South Africa in 1914, first in May 1915 to unveil the portrait of Poona-based Gopala Krishna Gokhale, who was his political mentor in the Lalbagh botanical garden, it was his second visit in 1924 that created a buzz in the city, as he was by then became a popular face of the freedom struggle in the southern region,” noted Doreswamy.

As a high school ward initially and a college student subsequently, Doreswamy heard a lot about Gandhi by word of mouth, listened to his voice in radio and read about him in the vernacular press those days.

“As I was curious to see Gandhiji and listen to his talk on the fight for freedom, my elder brother H.S. Seetharam took me to Kumara Krupa guest house for the prayer meeting one evening in 1936 when I was 18 years and he (Gandhiji) was 67 years old. He spoke in Hindi and English. His memorable words were translated into Kannada by noted scholar D.V. Gundappa for those un-familiar with either language,” recounted Doreswamy.

A reading of Gandhi’s book “My Early Life” influenced a young Doreswamy to plunge into the freedom struggle, giving up studies and an easy life. What started as a trickle in cities and towns across the country, turned into a mass movement with thousands of young people joining Gandhiji’s freedom struggle.

“I had an opportunity to meet Gandhiji again the same year (1936) when he was staying for about 40 days atop the Nandi Hills on the city’s northern outskirts. As there was no public transport, I shifted to Chikkaballapur from Bengaluru and stayed at a relative’s place so that I could often go up to the nearby Hills on foot to attend the prayer meeting and listen to his talks. I used to climb hundreds of steps briskly to be in time for the meeting and sit closer to him,” Doreswamy recollected.

In one of his speeches then, Gandhiji recalled his political guru (Gokhale) advising him to first travel across the country on foot, cycle, bullock carts, buses and trains (Class III compartment) for interacting with the people and know the ground realities than joining a political party (Congress) and resorting to sloganeering against the British Raj.

“Though there were no mikes or loudspeakers those days at all places where Gandhiji spoke, I used to sit in the front circular rows around him to catch every word of him in shrill voice so that we could note down and tell others who were behind or were late for the meeting,” pointed out the centurion.

When Gandhiji gave the “Quit India” call and launched the final movement against the British Raj in August 1942, Doreswamy was arrested in December the same year and was kept in the Bangalore central jail for 14 months till March 1944 as a detainee.

“I was inspired by Gandhiji so much that he had a great influence on me. In his book ‘My Early Life’, I was touched by his call to hug poverty and render voluntary service to the poor and needy. His words had a lasting effect on me to live a frugal life,” said Doreswamy.

The last time the veteran freedom fighter met Gandhiji was in December 1947 in Mumbai after India got independence on August 15 at a Congress rally.

“Gandhji’s death on January 30, 1948 in New Delhi was a shock to me because I could not believe that someone could even think of shooting him, as he was a noble soul and lived for others,” added Doreswamy.

Doreswamy, born on April 10, 1918 near Mysuru, about 150km northwest of Bengaluru, joined the freedom movement when he was in the intermediate college in Bengaluru during the mid-1930s. He was arrested for joining the Quit India movement along with his brother and other freedom fighters.

“Though we were caned and treated badly by the British, we followed Gandhiji’s ideals of non-violence and satyagraha,” reminisced Doreswamy.

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Male sex hormones may help treat breast cancer: Study

While endocrine therapy is standard-of-care for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, resistance to these drugs is the major cause of breast cancer mortality.

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Sydney : Researchers have found new evidence about the positive role of androgens, commonly thought of as male sex hormones but also found at lower levels in women, in breast cancer treatment.

In normal breast development, estrogen stimulates and androgen inhibits growth at puberty and throughout adult life.

Abnormal estrogen activity is responsible for the majority of breast cancers, but the role of androgen activity in this disease has been controversial.

The new research published in the journal Nature Medicine showed that androgens have potential for treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

A cancer is called estrogen receptor positive if it has receptors for estrogen, according to Breastcancer.org.

Using cell-line and patient-derived models, the global team, including researchers at the University of Adelaide and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia, demonstrated that androgen receptor activation by natural androgen or a new androgenic drug had potent anti-tumour activity in all estrogen receptor positive breast cancers, even those resistant to current standard-of-care treatments.

In contrast, androgen receptor inhibitors had no effect.

“This work has immediate implications for women with metastatic estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, including those resistant to current forms of endocrine therapy,” said lead researcher Theresa Hickey, Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide.

“We provide compelling new experimental evidence that androgen receptor stimulating drugs can be more effective than existing (e.g. Tamoxifen) or new (e.g. Palbociclib) standard-of-care treatments and, in the case of the latter, can be combined to enhance growth inhibition,” said Wayne Tilley, Director of the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide.

Androgens were historically used to treat breast cancer, but knowledge of hormone receptors in breast tissue was rudimentary at the time and the treatment’s efficacy misunderstood.

Androgen therapy was discontinued due to virilising side effects and the advent of anti-estrogenic endocrine therapies.

While endocrine therapy is standard-of-care for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, resistance to these drugs is the major cause of breast cancer mortality.

“The new insights from this study should clarify the widespread confusion over the role of the androgen receptor in estrogen receptor driven breast cancer,” said Elgene Lim, a breast oncologist and Head of the Connie Johnson Breast Cancer Research Lab at the Garvan Institute.

“Given the efficacy of this treatment strategy at multiple stages of disease in our study, we hope to translate these findings into clinical trials as a new class of endocrine therapy for breast cancer.”

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Azim Premji and Dr Devi Shetty chosen for PCB awards

Besides them 25 senior journalists have been selected for the ‘Press Club Annual Awards’, a release said.

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Azim Premji Wipro

Bengaluru, Jan 19: The chairman of Wipro Limited Azim Premji and the founder chairman of Narayana Health Dr Devi Prasad Shetty are among those who have been selected for the annual awards given by the Press Club of Bangalore.

Premji has been chosen for ‘Press Club Person of the Year’, while Dr Shetty and actor-Director Sudeep Sanjeev have been selected for the ‘Press Club Special Award.’

Besides them 25 senior journalists have been selected for the ‘Press Club Annual Awards’, a release said.

Chief Minister B S Yediyurappa will facilitate the awardees at a function scheduled for the third week of February, it said.

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Elizabeth Olsen: Nepotism creates fear that you don’t deserve the work you get

The actress added that she “always had this need to prove myself to everyone around me that I work really hard”, adding: “I couldn’t walk in a room without everyone already having an opinion.”

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Elizabeth Olsen

Los Angeles, Jan 19 : Hollywood star Elizabeth Olsen says she once thought of changing her surname and distance herself from the success of her family because it was insanity growing up in the spotlight.

“It was insanity. There were times when my sisters would always be spotted and I would be in the car with them and it would really freak me out. It has helped me navigate how I want to approach my career,” said the actress, whose older sisters are Mary-Kate Olsen and Ashley Olsen.

The actress added that she “always had this need to prove myself to everyone around me that I work really hard”, adding: “I couldn’t walk in a room without everyone already having an opinion.”

Elizabeth opened up om the fears of nepotism.

“The thing about nepotism is the fear that you don’t earn or deserve the work. There was even a part of me when I was a little girl that thought if I’m gonna be an actress I’m going to go by Elizabeth Chase, which is my middle name. And then, once I started working, I was like, ‘I love my family, I like my name, I love my sisters. Why would I be so ashamed of that?’ It’s fine now,” she said.

The actress said fame has made her more of a homebody.

“Fame has also made me someone who is more of a homebody than maybe I would like to be but I know where not to go. If I could do whatever I wanted for the day, I’d start with the gym, then I’d go to the grocery store, because it’s my favourite thing,” Elizabeth told The Sun.

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