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What to wear to conceal your tummy fat

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belly fat
Image Credit: Shutterstock

New Delhi, Aug 4: The most common problem that we face as an adult is a bigger tummy problem. Pregnancy and middle age are reasons for a bigger tummy. A lot of younger girls also face bigger tummy problem due to periods and bloating so make sure you are opting for right clothes.

Bhavya Chawla, Chief stylist at Voonik and Fashion designer Reynu Taandon, list down ways to hide your tummy fat.

* Wear dark colours or busy prints on your upper body. This will help you look slim and it will also hide your tummy fat.

* Avoid wearing shiny and bright colours on your upper body.

* Avoid wearing too tight or too loose clothes on your upper body. Too tight clothes will highlight your tummy even more and your body looks shapeless if you wear too loose clothes. So try to wear medium fit clothes.

* Go for mid-rise when it comes to jeans, pants, shalwars or skirts. Wear them around your naval. This will help in concealing the tummy.

* If you are wearing tops then body suits are the best option for you. This gives you a sleek look.

* Girls tend to buy one size smaller body shapers thinking that it will make them look slimmer but on the contrary this highlights your tummy even more and also feels uncomfortable. Therefore the size of your body shaper should be one size big.

* While buying undergarments make sure you buy mid-rise panties. Avoid low or high-rise.

* Choose high slits while opting for kurtis. This helps in concealing tummy.

* Layering is a good technique to conceal tummy fat. This divides your body into three parts and it helps in looking slimmer. For example wearing a contrast colored jacket on your kurti or wear another kurta on your kurti. But the kurta should be of a different color and the buttons should be kept open.

* With makeup and jewelers like big earring and neck pieces, you can attract the attention of others to your face and the people will not notice your tummy fat.

IANS

 

 

 

India

Muslim Family Transfers 110-Year-Old Sikh Manuscripts To Gurdwara In Pakistan

The ancient Sikhi Saroop, which had remained in the possession of a Sufi family in Gujrat in Pakistan’s Punjab province, has now been handed over to the administration of Gurdwara Baba Di Beri in Sialkot.

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Kartarpur Sahib Gurdwara in Pakistan

After 90 years of safekeeping, a Sufi organisation in Pakistan has transferred over 110-year old copies of rare Sikh manuscripts to the administration of a gurdwara in Sialkot in Punjab province to strengthen Muslim-Sikh brotherhood, according to a media report.

The two manuscripts of Guru Granth Sahib had long been in the safekeeping of Pir Syed Munir Naqshbandi, a revered Sufi elder from a village of Gujarat, the Sufi organisation’s head, Iftikhar Warraich Kalravi, told The Express Tribune.

Known to be an advocate for interfaith harmony, Naqshbandi had offered asylum at his residence to a few Sikh families trying to escape ethnic violence before partition, the daily said.

“Apart from sheltering some Sikh families, he had also salvaged some of their religious scriptures and kept them from being desecrated. Among them were the two manuscripts of Guru Granth Sahib.

“When the Sufi elder passed away in the year 1950, he had left the scriptures in the safekeeping of his children and since then they have remained with the family,” said Kakravi.

Kalravi said that Pir Naqshbandi had always campaigned for Muslim-Sikh brotherhood, while also campaigning for interfaith harmony in general.

“He was known for his kindness and this led to the revered Sikh manuscripts coming into his possession. After over 90 years of safekeeping within the Pir’s family, we have now decided that the manuscripts should now be rightfully transferred to the Gurdwara Sahib. This is a great example of Muslim-Sikh friendship and will help further strengthen our relationships,” Kalravi said.

The 500-year-old Baba Di Beri Gurdwara in Sialkot, about 140 kms from here, last year in July opened its doors for Indian Sikh pilgrims. Earlier, Indians were not allowed to visit the gurdwara.

According to the Sikh tradition, when Guru Nanak — the founder of Sikhism and the first of the 10 Sikh Gurus, arrived in Sialkot from Kashmir in the 16th Century, he stayed under the tree of Beri. Sardar Natha Singh then built a gurdwara in his remembrance at the site.

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India

CAG picks holes in Railway’s elaborate plans for Kumbh Mela

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Prayagraj, Kumbh 2019

New Delhi, Sep 23 : The Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India on Wednesday pointed out various shortcomings in Railways’ elaborate plans to control rail traffic during the Kumbh Mela in 2019.

In the report tabled in both Parliament, the government auditor slammed the railways for failing to address issues such as running of special trains, works related to passenger amenities and safety, medical facilities to passengers, and waste management at station premises during the massive religious gathering.

It said that this led to inconvenience to passengers, who were not adequately addressed by the railways.

“Temporary fencing at vulnerable locations (track and station entry point) were not completed. This led to cases of free movement of cattle on tracks and passengers trespassing. Audit noted that the Railway estimated (September 2018) an evacuation of 33 lakh passengers, which was subsequently revised (December 2018) to 45.48 lakh. Railways initiated a figure of 73.66 lakh evacuation of passengers during Mela period,” it said.

It also noted that the Railways planned 821 special trains, but ran only 565.

“A significantly higher number of passengers, with fewer special trains resulted in large overcrowding of trains and caused much inconvenience to passengers,” it said.

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India

Bilkis from Shaheen Bagh is TIME magazine’s hundred most influential people of 2020

Bilkis gave hope and strength to activists and student leaders who were being thrown behind bars for standing up for the unpopular truth in a democracy that was sliding into authoritarianism, and inspired peaceful copycat protests across the country.

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Shaheen Bagh

When I first met Bilkis, she sat in the midst of a crowd, surrounded by young women who were protesting with placards displaying verses of revolution. With prayer beads in one hand and the national flag in the other, Bilkis became the voice of the marginalized in India, an 82-year-old who would sit at a protest site from 8 a.m. to midnight.

She had been sitting there ever since Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government passed the Citizenship Amendment Act, which could block Muslims from citizenship in the country, in December, and she continued through the cold winter. Bilkis, along with thousands of women who joined her in Shaheen Bagh, a neighborhood in New Delhi, became the symbol of resistance in a nation where the voices of women and minorities were being systematically drowned out by the majoritarian politics of the Modi regime. Bilkis gave hope and strength to activists and student leaders who were being thrown behind bars for standing up for the unpopular truth in a democracy that was sliding into authoritarianism, and inspired peaceful copycat protests across the country.

She said to me as a parting note: “I will sit here till blood stops flowing in my veins so the children of this country and the world breathe the air of justice and equality.” Bilkis deserves recognition so the world acknowledges the power of resistance against tyranny.

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