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What is common between Neymar and Modi? Both are Drama Queens

The similarity between Neymar and Modi doesn’t end here. They may have chosen to be the drama queens for obvious reasons but in the end dram doesn’t pay.

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Narendra Modi

Neymar da Silva Santos Junior, commonly known as Neymar is a Brazilian superstar striker who is considered one of the best players in the world. He is a professional footballer who plays as a forward for French club Paris Saint-Germain and the Brazil national team.

He often becomes target of criticism and laughter because of his deliberate acts of playing a victim card by feigning injuries. He has shown enough examples of his act in the ongoing Football World Cup 2018 in Russia. The Swiss broadcaster RTS Sport has done a detailed research on the Brazilian superstar and counted how much time Neymar has spent during the five World Cup matches of the Brazilian team on the ground.

The spectators were left unimpressed with Neymar’s injury antics during the crucial World Cup match between Brazil and Mexico. Neymar is quite famous for his unique ball skill, but is equally as famous for faking injuries during big games.

In a video which has become viral, he can be seen rolling around, clutching his ankle, and biting his finger supposedly in agony. The game was interrupted and Neymar needed a few minutes of treatment and soon out of nowhere sprang back into action.

In the very first game against Switzerland, Neymar remained on the ground for three minutes and 40 seconds, in the next game against Costa Rica, he was on ground for another two minutes and 44 seconds and in the last preliminary round match against Serbia a minute and 56 seconds.

In the pre-quarterfinal match against Mexico in Samara alone, it was five minutes and 29 seconds, two minutes after Mexican defender Miguel Layun kicked him. Overall, Neymar spent almost 14 minutes on the ground, in five World Cup matches. But all these histrionics were not good enough to prolong the stay of five times world champion in the tournament and were simply outclassed by Belgium in a quarter final match.

The striker is usually ridiculed for acting out in by several former players and coaches. “It’s a shame for the game, a negative example for the world, for children and an adverse publicity for the game of football. There should be limit on such acting, because it had a big impact on us. I think we lost the thread because of referee’s decisions in the second half ” said Mexican coach Juan Carlos Osorio after the World Cup knockout round, which his team lost by 2-0.

If we look for parallel for this gifted player from Brazil, we need not to go very far. We have our own drama queen in India and he is none other than our Honourable Prime Minister Narendra Modi. No one can beat him if it comes about playing to the gallery and creating dramas.

On Feb 21, 2014 while addressing a youth rally at Ahmedabad, he launched a blistering attack at Congress by saying that Congress always looked for chances to kill him or beat him. He further added that Congress didn’t like the fact that a tea seller was challenging such a big political empire.

Mr Modi said that Congress leaders may throw muck and let loose the CBI and Income Tax to harass him but still they would not be able to stop him from serving the country. He also made an emotional pitch saying he had not left his house for any post or for fame.

Mr Modi also made a huge drama about army’s surgical strike in September, 2016 in order to gain some TRPs. In 2014 during election campaign, he boasted that if elected he will bring 10 Pakistani soldier’s head in lieu of one dead Indian soldier. After coming to power, he forgot his promise and Indian soldiers kept losing their lives.

We are not questioning whether the supposed surgical strike took place or not. It wasn’t as if surgical strike happened for the first time. It is normal practice for our army to conduct such strikes whenever the situation is ripe for such actions but it was for the first time that such routine army exercises were used for political benefit.

In April this year, PM Modi went on a daylong fast to protest against the logjam in the Parliament. The main opposition party Congress termed the fast undertaken by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and BJP leaders as nothing but a photo-opportunity. Now this act of Prime Minister was anything but drama considering it was his own government which wasted 250 hours of Parliament.

Last month, there was news regarding unearthing of a conspiracy to assassinate PM Modi in “Rajiv Gandhi style”. Maharashtra Police made an explosive revelation in June this year after recovering a letter from an alleged naxal operative in Pune. The police claimed to have exposed a plot to kill Prime Minister Narendra Modi which was hatched by Maoists.

At first, the Pune police arrested five activists in connection with Bheema Koregaon violence, alleging their links with the Maoists who funded the Elgar Yatra, which was organised to celebrate 200 years of Bhima-Koregaon battle. Two days later, the police said all these accused were involved in a conspiracy to kill PM and came out with two e mails describing the plan to assassinate Modi.

The interesting part of the entire investigation was that before the e mails could reach the court, they were accessed by a pro BJP TV channel and a BJP spokesperson. After the e mails went public, the Police Chief Satish Mathur came with a ridiculous explanation that the letters were leaked by Maoists. This threat to PM was clearly a publicity stunt for getting public sympathy.

Interestingly, since 2009 such conspiracies to kill PM Modi have surfaced many times. Gujarat police have exposed four such ploys but never bothered to reveal the details of such investigations which raise questions regarding the authenticity of such claims. Even the former police officers who have dealt with Naxals and Maoists questioned the veracity of the e mails. In fact, one didn’t need to be an expert to realise that the letters were fictitious. One has to be really naive to believe Maoists could write such detailed plans to execute the PM in an e mail. Surprisingly, when the five activists were presented before the court, the police did not even mention the plot to kill PM. On contrary, in the next hearing on June 14, police twisted the original plot to kill PM and claimed that the accused were planning to organise a lecture in the memory of alleged naxalite Navin Babu at JNU.

The similarity between Neymar and Modi doesn’t end here. They may have chosen to be the drama queens for obvious reasons but in the end dram doesn’t pay. Neymar deliberately indulged in drama on the football field to get a much needed free kick or a penalty in order to bring a victory for his team which eluded him in the end. Similarly, Mr Modi plays the role of a drama queen to impress his voters but he forgets that people may be fooled by his antics on few times but in the end, it is his performance as a Prime Minister which is going to matter and not these tricks.

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Lakhs of towels, bedhseets missing from AC coaches – passengers are suspects

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

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Indian Railway Bed Rolls

New Delhi, Nov 15 : Affluent AC passengers are the prime suspects as over 21 lakh towels, bedsheets, blankets and other items went missing from air-conditioned coaches during 2017-18 an official said.

The passengers are suspected to have made off with precisely 21,72,246 “bedroll items” — including 12,83,415 hand towels, 4,71,077 bedsheets and 3,14,952 pillow covers — from trains across the country in the last fiscal.

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

“Together, the missing items are estimated to cost over Rs 14 crore,” a senior Railway Ministry official told IANS.

While the theft of toilet mugs, taps, flush pipes and mirrors are also reported on a regular basis, the missing bedroll items in substantial numbers has posed a challenge for the Railways, which is trying to provide better amenities to upper class passengers.

Currently, about 3.9 lakh sets of linen are provided daily — this comprises two bedsheets, a towel, a pillow and a blanket for each passenger in the AC classes.

“The maximum number of items stolen are towels, followed by bedsheets, as reported by coach attendants at the end of each journey,” the official said.

In the light of the thefts, especially of towels, the Railways has decided that the face towels given to passengers travelling in air-conditioned coaches will be replaced with cheaper, smaller, disposable, takeaway napkins, said the official.

The Railways has already started changing the cover of blankets in some sections while the frequency of washing is being increased from monthly to fortnightly and weekly.

There is also a move to increase the frequency of washing of blankets to begin with and replacing the existing ones with the newly designed lightweight blankets made of soft fabric in a phased manner.

The plan envisages improvement of linen management with the aim of providing clean, hygienic and good quality linen to passengers travelling in AC classes, the official said.

Among the 16 zones of Indian Railways, the Southern zone alone accounted for the theft of 2,04,113 hand towels, 29,573 bedsheets, 44,868 pillow covers, 3,713 pillows and 2,745 blankets.

In the missing list, South Central zone has registered 95,700 towels, 29,747 pillow covers, 22,323 bedsheets, 3,352 blankets and 2,463 pillows.

In the Northern zone, 85,327 towels, 38,916 bedsheets, 25,313 pillow covers, 3,224 pillows and 2,483 blankets were found missing.

In the East Central zone, 33,234 bedsheets, 22,769 pillow covers, 1,657 pillows, 76,852 towels, and 3,132 blankets were stolen last year.

In the Eastern zone, 1,31,313 towels, 20,258 bedsheets, 9,006 pillow covers, 1,517 pillows and 1,913 blankets were reported missing by attendants after the end of the train journey.

The East Coast railways has registered 43,318 towels, 23,197 bedsheets, 8,060 pillow covers, and 2,260 blankets as missing.

(Arun Kumar Das can be contacted at [email protected])

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Lakhs of towels, bedhseets missing from AC coaches – passengers are suspects

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indian-railways

New Delhi, Nov 15: Affluent AC passengers are the prime suspects as over 21 lakh towels, bedsheets, blankets and other items went missing from air-conditioned coaches during 2017-18 an official said.

The passengers are suspected to have made off with precisely 21,72,246 “bedroll items” — including 12,83,415 hand towels, 4,71,077 bedsheets and 3,14,952 pillow covers — from trains across the country in the last fiscal.

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

“Together, the missing items are estimated to cost over Rs 14 crore,” a senior Railway Ministry official told IANS.

While the theft of toilet mugs, taps, flush pipes and mirrors are also reported on a regular basis, the missing bedroll items in substantial numbers has posed a challenge for the Railways, which is trying to provide better amenities to upper class passengers.

Currently, about 3.9 lakh sets of linen are provided daily — this comprises two bedsheets, a towel, a pillow and a blanket for each passenger in the AC classes.

“The maximum number of items stolen are towels, followed by bedsheets, as reported by coach attendants at the end of each journey,” the official said.

In the light of the thefts, especially of towels, the Railways has decided that the face towels given to passengers travelling in air-conditioned coaches will be replaced with cheaper, smaller, disposable, takeaway napkins, said the official.

The Railways has already started changing the cover of blankets in some sections while the frequency of washing is being increased from monthly to fortnightly and weekly.

There is also a move to increase the frequency of washing of blankets to begin with and replacing the existing ones with the newly designed lightweight blankets made of soft fabric in a phased manner.

The plan envisages improvement of linen management with the aim of providing clean, hygienic and good quality linen to passengers travelling in AC classes, the official said.

Among the 16 zones of Indian Railways, the Southern zone alone accounted for the theft of 2,04,113 hand towels, 29,573 bedsheets, 44,868 pillow covers, 3,713 pillows and 2,745 blankets.

In the missing list, South Central zone has registered 95,700 towels, 29,747 pillow covers, 22,323 bedsheets, 3,352 blankets and 2,463 pillows.

In the Northern zone, 85,327 towels, 38,916 bedsheets, 25,313 pillow covers, 3,224 pillows and 2,483 blankets were found missing.

In the East Central zone, 33,234 bedsheets, 22,769 pillow covers, 1,657 pillows, 76,852 towels, and 3,132 blankets were stolen last year.

In the Eastern zone, 1,31,313 towels, 20,258 bedsheets, 9,006 pillow covers, 1,517 pillows and 1,913 blankets were reported missing by attendants after the end of the train journey.

The East Coast railways has registered 43,318 towels, 23,197 bedsheets, 8,060 pillow covers, and 2,260 blankets as missing.

IANS

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India’s higher education system needs drastic changes to address tech-induced challenges

Further, India’s GER for the male population is 26.3 per cent and 25.4 per cent for females. The GER also varies across different social groups — 21.8 per cent for the Scheduled Castes and 15.9 per cent for the Scheduled Tribes.

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education

As the world stands on the brink of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, powered by a wide range of new technology breakthroughs such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), advanced robotics, Internet of Things IoT), Cloud computing and 3D printing, major changes are expected in the labour market globally.

There will be reduced demand for middle-skilled workers doing repetitive tasks and increased demand for more highly-skilled workers — and also low-skilled workers doing non-routine work. While many developed countries, such as the US and Japan, as also several European economies, are already experiencing this polarisation, the labour market is also hollowing out in many developing countries, although at a rate slower than the developed world.

In the case of India, this polarisation can be seen in the organised manufacturing sector, where the share of high-skilled occupations in total manufacturing employment increased by more than three percentage points, while the share of middle-skilled jobs decreased by 6.3 percentage points from 1993-94 to 2011-12. Looking at the impact of technological progress on various manufacturing industries, the capital-intensive industries, such as automobile manufacturers, have a greater probability of adopting advanced automation and robotic technologies, compared to labour-intensive manufacturing industries such as textile, apparel, leather and footwear, and paper manufacturers.

Further, in the services sector, particularly in the IT sector, e-commerce, banking and financial services and health care services, there is a huge potential for automation technologies, which would increase the demand for skilled workers and reduce the demand for middle-skilled workers.

However, in India, over 80 per cent of the working population is engaged in low-skilled jobs in the unorganised sector. These low-skilled workers aspire to join the middle-skilled workforce in the organised sector to raise themselves from poverty. However, the changing nature of work due to technology advancements in the organised sector prevents their upward labour mobility and any improvement in their incomes.

Addressing these challenges requires reforms in India’s higher education system. The institutes of higher learning should shun dated teaching methodologies and redesign the course curriculum by understanding key market transitions amidst the technological advancements. This would enable the country to create a workforce which could be placed in the positions demanded by the companies in the digital era and thus bridge the skill gap in the labour market.

However, looking at the current state of higher education in India, one can see that it is not just the quality of the system which needs to be improved. There is also much to be done in terms of the number of students enrolled in the institutes of higher learning. The Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) in tertiary education in India is 26.9 per cent, which is lower than that of China (48.4 per cent), Indonesia (27.9 per cent) and the Philippines (35.3 per cent), among others.

Further, India’s GER for the male population is 26.3 per cent and 25.4 per cent for females. The GER also varies across different social groups — 21.8 per cent for the Scheduled Castes and 15.9 per cent for the Scheduled Tribes.

There are also wide variations in the number of colleges for higher education across different states in India, with the lowest number of seven colleges in Bihar for every 0.1 million of eligible population to 51 in Telangana and Karnataka. The top eight states in terms of highest number of colleges are Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Madhya Pradesh, which have 28 or more colleges per 0.1 million of the population. The disparity in the distribution of the colleges is also seen across different districts in these states, with the top 50 districts having about 32.6 per cent of the colleges.

In addition to the inequalities existing in the access to institutions for higher education, another issue is that a majority of the students are enrolled in undergraduate level programmes, compared to the Masters and the Doctoral programmes. Moreover, at the undergraduate level, there is a low pass-out rate — out of 2,90,16,350 students enrolled at undergraduate level, only 6,419,639 passed-out in 2017.

It is imperative for the country to address these issues given that the Indian system of higher education faces multiple challenges of low gross enrollment in its colleges and universities, with predominance of students settling on undergraduate studies, along with various socio-economic inequalities existing in access to higher learning. Further, emphasis must be placed on increasing the number of students who pass out of the colleges/universities, along with increasing enrollment numbers.

The technology-induced skill gap which the Indian economy is facing across different sectors is bound to widen with the current higher education system. Change has to be brought from outside the existing constructs. Improvement in the teaching methodology from the traditional lecture courses, accreditation of online courses, along with redesigning the course curriculum to be more industry relevant are some of the ways the technology-led changes in the labour market can be dealt with.

(Amit Kapoor is chair, Institute for Competitiveness, India. The views expressed are personal. He can be contacted at [email protected] and tweets @kautiliya. Deepti Mathur, senior researcher at large, Institute for Competitiveness has contributed to the article)

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