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We told India in advance about road building, says China

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India-China, Sikkim Border

Beijing, Aug 2: China on Wednesday said it had informed India in advance about its road building activity in Doklam on the border and reiterated its demanded that New Delhi must withdraw its troops immediately from the area.

In a document, Beijing has dismissed India’s claims that China was attempting to change the status quo of the border region by building a road.

It said that Indian troops “transgressing” into Chinese territory was “indeed a real attempt to change the status quo of the boundary, and it has gravely undermined peace and tranquility of the China-India border area”.

The comments came in a document titled “The Facts and China’s Position Concerning the Indian Border Troops Crossing of the China-India Boundary in the Sikkim Sector into the Chinese Territory”.

It dismissed India’s contention that the road building at the tri-junction of India, China and Bhutan had serious security implications for New Delhi.

“To cross a delimited boundary and enter the territory of a neighbouring country on the grounds of so-called ‘security concerns’, for whatever activities, runs counter to the basic principles of international law and basic norms governing international relations.”

It said: “No such attempt will be tolerated by any sovereign state, still less should it be the normal way of conduct between China and India as two neighbouring states.”

The document maintained that China had no issues with Bhutan and both sides were deliberating on the boundary issue and this was of no concern to India.

“The China-Bhutan boundary issue is one between China and Bhutan. It has nothing to do with India. As a third party, India has no right to interfere in or impede the boundary talks
between China and Bhutan, still less the right to make territorial claims on Bhutan’s behalf,” it said.

IANS

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Trump slammed for calling to Deport immigrant “Invaders”

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Washington, June 25 : United States President Donald Trump has said undocumented immigrants should be immediately deported without trial or any judicial process, drawing sharp criticism from rights groups who say such a move would be illegal and violate the constitution.

Trump has argued that people who cross the border into the country illegally were invaders and must immediately be deported without an appearance before a judge.

In a series of tweets on Sunday, Trump described immigrants as invaders, called US immigration laws “a mockery” and wrote that they must be changed to take away legal rights from undocumented migrants, reports The Washington Post.

“We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country,” Trump wrote.

“When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came.

“Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order. Most children come without parents.”

The President continued in a second tweet: “Our Immigration policy, laughed at all over the world, is very unfair to all of those people who have gone through the system legally and are waiting on line for years!

“Immigration must be based on merit – we need people who will help to Make America Great Again!”

Trump also exhorted congressional Democrats to “fix the laws”, arguing that “we need strength and security at the Border! Cannot accept all of the people trying to break into our Country”.

The President had signed an executive order last week aimed at keeping some families together at the border after his administration faced calls to stop separating children from parents.

But Sunday’s remarks have led to confusion and urmoil in Congress as the House prepares to vote on a sweeping immigration bill this week.

The legislation would provide $25 billion for Trump’s long-sought border wall, limit legal immigration and give young undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship.

Democrats and immigrant rights advocates sought to shame Trump for saying he wants to deny illegal immigrants their due-process rights, The Washington Post reported.

“America rules by law,” tweeted Virginia Democrat Gerald E. Connolly, “not by presidential diktat.”

Omar Jadwat, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, said: “What President Trump has suggested here is both illegal and unconstitutional. Any official who has sworn an oath to uphold the Constitution and laws should disavow it unequivocally.”

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Deadly clashes in Nigeria leave 86 dead, Prez appeals for calm

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Abuja, June 25: Curfew has been imposed in Nigeria after 86 people were killed in violent clashes between Muslim herders and Christian farmers.

President Muhammadu Buhari  has appealed for calm late following violent clashes between mostly Muslim herders and Christian farmers in the central state of Plateau  and described the deaths as “deeply unfortunate killings.”

President Muhammadu Buhari said that “no efforts will be spared to bring the perpetrators to justice” and prevent further violence.

Some reports say fighting began on Thursday when ethnic Berom farmers attacked Fulani herders, killing five of them. A retaliatory attack on Saturday led to more deaths.

The area has a decades-long history of violence between ethnic groups competing for land.

Police Commissioner Undie Adie said a search of villages following the bloodshed revealed that 86 people had been killed, and six injured.

He said 50 houses had been burned, as well as 15 motorbikes and two vehicles.

The Plateau state government said the curfew would be in place between 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. (Nigerian time) in the Riyom, Barikin Ladi and Jos South areas “to avert a breakdown of law and order”.

This region, where the Muslim north meets the Christian south is prone to religious tension – herders are ethnic Fulani and mostly Muslim, while the farmers are mostly Christian.

The country is already engaged in fighting two insurgences – Boko Haram in the north and militants in the oil-producing south.

 

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Koreas talks on restoring military communication lines

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Seoul, June 25: South Korea and North Korea held working-level talks on Monday on the issue of moving forward with restoration of cross-border military communication lines in an attempt to reduce tension and build trust amid the recent diplomatic rapprochement.

The meeting, led by South Korean Colonel Cho Yong-geun and North Korean Colonel Om Chang-nam, started at 10 a.m. at the Customs, Immigration, and Quarantine office in Paju, south of the inter-Korean border, a spokesperson of the South Korean Defence Ministry said.

Both sides will discuss ways to completely restore western and eastern communication lines, which were suspended during periods of diplomatic tensions, including telephone and fax lines set up years ago to prevent misunderstandings that could provoke unnecessary clashes.

The two sides opened the western communication line in 2002 and the eastern one was established in 2003.

The western communication line  was suspended in 2016 after Seoul shut down the inter-Korean industrial complex in Kaesong as a response to the nuclear test that the North Korean regime conducted that year.

The telephone link was restored in January this year just before the Winter PyeongChang Olympic Games, which marked the beginning of a rapprochement on the Korean peninsula as well as led to the subsequent dialogue with the US.

The eastern communication line was blocked in 2011 amid then-rising military tensions and completely cut off in 2013 due to a forest fire.

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