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Twitter’s new terms of service draw online criticism

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San Francisco, Sep 5: Twitter’s new terms of service that apparently allow other companies to re-publish content on its platform without any compensation have sparked widespread online criticism.

The clause that has received flak allows the micro-blogging website to make content that is posted on Twitter “available to other companies, organisations or individuals” who can then re-publish it.

“You agree that this license includes the right for Twitter to provide, promote, and improve the Services and to make Content submitted to or through the Services available to other companies, organizations or individuals for the syndication, broadcast, distribution, promotion or publication of such Content on other media and services, subject to our terms and conditions for such Content use,” the terms read under “Your Rights” section.

First noticed by a Twitter user Richard de Nooy who called it “grotesque”, the clause led to several people retweeting and slamming it, the Independent daily reported.

The clause further reads: “Such additional uses by Twitter, or other companies, organizations or individuals, may be made with no compensation paid to you with respect to the Content that you submit, post, transmit or otherwise make available through the Services.”

The new terms will come into effect for people outside of the US at the end of the month.

Twitter is “showing a pop-up to all affected users that warns them to take a look at the new terms and asks them to agree with them, or delete their account of they don’t”, the report added.

The terms, however, say that “Twitter respects the intellectual property rights of others and expects users of the Services to do the same”.

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Facebook Messenger app crash? Try new update

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San Francisco, June 16: Facebook’s latest update for its Messenger app can fix the app that was crashing constantly among many iOS users, the media reported.

Version 170.0 was the buggy release, and the company has already submitted a fix (170.1) to Apple, The Verge reported on Friday.

The users can now identify the version by tapping “more” in the updates tab of the App Store.

According to The Verge, many people noticed that the app was crashing frequently after updating the previous update (170.0). The users found Messenger opens well initially. But when they switch to another app and come back to the messenger, it fades to black and crashes to the iPhone home screen.

According to a spokesperson, Facebook was aware of the issue and working on a new update.

Facebook has now confirmed that the new update should solve the issue, CNET reported.

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Google Doodle remembers famous glass chemist Marga Faulstich

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New Delhi, June 16: Google on Saturday remembered the famous German glass chemist Marga Faulstich on her 103rd birthday with a Doodle. She was the first woman executive at global glass manufacturer Schott AG.

Born on June 16, 1915, Faulstich worked with Schott AG for 44 years.

During this time, she worked on more than 300 types of optical glasses and 40 patients were registered in her name.

Faulstich began her training as a graduate assistant at Schott AG after graduating in 1935 from high school, according to Google.

In her early years, she worked on the development of thin films.

Her findings are still being used in the manufacturing of sunglasses, anti-reflective lenses and glass facades.

Faulstich received international recognition for the invention of the lightweight lens “SF 64”, for which she was honoured in 1973.

She died in 1998 in Mainz at the age of 82.

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Google needs to do more on bridging gender gap: Report

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San Francisco, June 15: Although the percentage of women in leadership roles at Google has increased from 20.8 to 25.5 per cent in the last four years, women still make up only 30.9 per cent of its global workforce while men 69.1 per cent, the tech giant has revealed.

In its annual diversity report released on Thursday, Google said it has made some progress in leadership ranks by gender and ethnicity.

“The data in this report shows that despite significant effort, and some pockets of success, we need to do more to achieve our desired diversity and inclusion outcomes,” said Danielle Brown, VP-Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer.

In 2017, women hires in tech positions rose to 24.5 per cent, although overall hiring of women dropped from 31.4 per cent to 31.2 per cent.

“Since 2014, women hires in tech have increased from 20.8 per cent to 24.5 per cent, which shows that our focus on hiring more women into technical positions is having impact,” said Brown.

The diversity report came after a year when an employee named James Damore sent out a long anti-diversity memo and was later fired.

Damore’s memo, titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber”, claims that when it comes to technology, there is a biological difference between men and women.

In February this year, the US National Labour Relations Board (NLRB) said that Google did not violate labour laws when it fired Damore.

According to the new diversity report, in terms of race and ethnicity (US data only), 2.5 per cent of Google’s workforce is Black, 3.6 per cent is Hispanic/Latin, 36.3 per cent is Asian and 53.1 per cent is White.

“Our gains in women’s representation have largely been driven by White and Asian women. Representation of Asian women increased considerably to 12.5 per cent of Google’s workforce, up from 10 per cent overall in 2014,” the report noted.

This is lower than the increase for Asian men who make up 25.7 per cent of Google, up from 21.4 per cent in 2014.

Attrition rates in 2017 were highest for Black Googlers followed by Latin Googlers, and lowest for Asian Googlers.

“Black Googler attrition rates, while improving in recent years, have offset some of our hiring gains, which has led to smaller increases in representation than we would have seen otherwise.”

“We’re working hard to better understand what drives higher attrition and taking focused measures to improve it,” Brown added.

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