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Trafficking victim forced to have sex with AI luminary

At the time of the incident, the alleged victim was 17 while Minsky was 73, according to The Verge.

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San Francisco, Aug 10 (IANS) A sex trafficking victim of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein has testified that she was forced to have sex with Artificial Intelligence (AI) luminary and MIT professor Marvin Minsky on Epstein’s island, a newly unsealed deposition has revealed.

The accusation was revealed in a 2016 deposition unsealed on Friday.

The victim, with Virginia Giuffre, said she was also instructed to have sex with former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, Prince Andrew of Britain and other prominent men, the VentureBeat reported on Friday.

At the time of the incident, the alleged victim was 17 while Minsky was 73, according to The Verge.

In July, the US Attorney’s Office – Southern District of New York indicted Epstein on multiple charges and accused of running a sex trafficking operation of underage girls, the VentureBeat report added.

He was known to be closely associated with prominent politicians including incumbent US President Donald Trump and also former President Bill Clinton.

Minsky, who died in 2016, was a noted American cognitive scientist concerned largely with the research of AI, co-founder of the MIT’s AI laboratory and author of several texts concerning AI and philosophy.

He was known as a close associate of Epstein, however, this is the first direct accusation implicating him in the Epstein’s sex trafficking network.

Epstein is a convicted sex offender and financier who began his career in finance at the investment bank Bear Stearns, before forming his own company named J. Epstein & Co.

Fashion

Is watching porn linked to erectile dysfunction in men?

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If you are not enjoying a good bedroom life, blame pornography. According to a sexual health expert in UK, single or divorced men are more likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction (impotence) because they have become too used to porn or having ‘unsatisfactory’ sex lives.

A report by London-based clinic Numan found that 80 per cent of men living in the UK have experienced erectile dysfunction.

Speaking on the report to FEMAIL, women’s column in the Daily Mail, Chartered Psychologist Felix Economakisto blamed pornography and drinking too much for causing problems in the bedroom of single, divorced men.

“The first reason is that they often tend to have either negligent, absent or unsatisfactory sex lives. That means they feel rather ‘de-skilled’ and not confident when it comes to the bedroom,” Economakisto, was quoted as saying.

Millions of men have been affected by erectile dysfunction.

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The study, which was conducted by the Market Research Society, asked 1,000 divorced men in the UK if they had experienced a sexual performance problem, reported Daily Mail.

According to the research, four-fifths of those men questioned admitted they had struggled with erectile dysfunction.

“If men become ‘wound up’ about goals and work, it could also impact their performance during sex,” Economakisto said.

“Sometimes men can also be so wound up about performance goals and reviews at work that they tend to start perceiving performance in the bedroom as yet another ‘customer’ to keep happy, complete with fear of unsatisfactory reviews,” he said.

“Watching pornography could cause erectile dysfunction,” he added.

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Health

Keto diet may help you fight the flu

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New York,  A ketogenic diet, which includes meat, fish, poultry and non-starchy vegetables, may help combat the flu virus, suggests new research.

This diet regimen activates a subset of T cells in the lungs not previously associated with the immune system’s response to influenza, enhancing mucus production from airway cells that can effectively trap the virus, said the study published in the journal Science Immunology.

“This was a totally unexpected finding,” said co-senior author Akiko Iwasaki, Professor at Yale University in the US.The researchers found that mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates.

Specifically, the researchers found that the ketogenic diet triggered the release of gamma delta T cells, immune system cells that produce mucus in the cell linings of the lung — while the high-carbohydrate diet did not.

When mice were bred without the gene that codes for gamma delta T cells, the ketogenic diet provided no protection against the influenza virus.

“This study shows that the way the body burns fat to produce ketone bodies from the food we eat can fuel the immune system to fight flu infection,” said co-senior author Visha Deep Dixit, Professor at Yale University.

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Lifestyle

Diabetes-related stress more harmful for young adults

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New York, Nov 16 (IANS) Young people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

Age plays a critical role in the well-being of people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.”We found we can evaluate a patient’s initial stress and predict how they will be doing six months later,” said Vicki Helgeson, professor of psychology at the university.

“If you can identify people who are facing diabetes distress earlier, you can intervene and prevent their health from declining,” said the findings published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years.

They found younger patients (42 years and younger) experienced higher diabetes-related and psychological distress.

In addition, patients with higher education and income expressed more stress. Conversely, older patients (older than 64 years) had less psychological stress and greater consistency in self-care, blood sugar control and medication adherence.

Patients in long-term relationships also reported less diabetes stress.Patients identified diet as the greatest stressor (38 per cent).

Other significant stressors include checking blood sugar (8 per cent) and experiencing high or low blood sugar events (7 per cent).

Patients who self-reported greater stress also reported greater depressed mood, less adherence to medication and higher anxiety.

“Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever,” Helgeson said. “Life gets in the way of sticking to a diabetes regimen.”

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