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The mathematics of Yoga

Like geometry, each asana is like science in its formation which consists of solutions to problems

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June 21, 2020 : Yoga is the ancient and traditional science that is designed for humankind’s universal well-being and advancement. Asanas form just one aspect of yoga, and yoga contains 82 lakh asanas in total. They are inspired by the science of nature, and named after the sages who performed Tapasya holding a particular posture for centuries.

Each asana comes with its own specifications of alignment, breath, Dhrishti (gaze), and even direction. Just like sacred geometry, asanas hold a science in its formation which consists of solutions to problems. Yoga is a holistic tool that works on the physical, spiritual and energetic aspects of the individual. Therefore, yoga asanas affect everything from organ health, mental well-being, give you a strong and flexible body and also aid in spiritual development. 

Through breath, yoga aspires to connect and unite us with our consciousness. It is a journey of the self to the self and through the self, and asana forms just one of the many yogic practices on the path of yoga.

Formula of Vinyasas

When asanas are woven together, they form a sequence also known as Vinyasa. In this style of practice, rather than static postures, many asanas are threaded into a scientific sequence with a specific goal or purpose to it. Some well-known flows include the Surya Namaskar and the Chandra Namaskar.

The Surya Namaskar contains a total number of 8 asanas woven into a sequence of 12 steps for each side, Right and Left. When you begin the Surya Namaskar, you must start with the Right side as the sun’s energy is represented symbolically through this side, while the Moon is represented by the Left. One complete cycle is done when you cover both the sides, and this is made of 24 counts, says lifestyle coach Grand Master Akshar.

Moon

The moon represents emotions, emotional intelligence and taste. As the Chandra Nadi or Moon Channel runs along the left side, you begin the Chandra Namaskar with your left leg first. Chandra Namaskar must be practiced at 6 pm facing the Moon. The Chandra Namaskar contains a total number of 9 asanas woven into a sequence of 14 steps for each side, Right and Left. The Left side is the moon energy and is represented symbolically through this flow, while the Sun is represented by the Right. One complete cycle is done when you cover both the sides, and this is made of 28 counts.

In this way, even the right and the left sides of the body hold special powers or energies within them that can influence our health, and life.

chakra

Asana science

Yoga recommends which asanas are best done at what time of the day. Some asanas are restricted for women during their monthly cycles, during pregnancy etc. This only goes to show that yoga asanas are not mere physical exercises. They hold deep and ancient secrets that are linked to the spiritual path to attain the divine consciousness. Certain schools like Hatha, and Ashtanga detail out the sequence of your practice suggesting the order in which they need to be done.

It is important to maintain a sense of sanctity when following this science. It is not to be done whimsically, it is important to know the right techniques to get in and to navigate out of the postures. Voluminous books consisting of each and every detail of asana science contain the knowledge of their formula, and can help us attain the true benefit from them by following the correct procedures.

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Male sex hormones may help treat breast cancer: Study

While endocrine therapy is standard-of-care for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, resistance to these drugs is the major cause of breast cancer mortality.

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Sydney : Researchers have found new evidence about the positive role of androgens, commonly thought of as male sex hormones but also found at lower levels in women, in breast cancer treatment.

In normal breast development, estrogen stimulates and androgen inhibits growth at puberty and throughout adult life.

Abnormal estrogen activity is responsible for the majority of breast cancers, but the role of androgen activity in this disease has been controversial.

The new research published in the journal Nature Medicine showed that androgens have potential for treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

A cancer is called estrogen receptor positive if it has receptors for estrogen, according to Breastcancer.org.

Using cell-line and patient-derived models, the global team, including researchers at the University of Adelaide and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia, demonstrated that androgen receptor activation by natural androgen or a new androgenic drug had potent anti-tumour activity in all estrogen receptor positive breast cancers, even those resistant to current standard-of-care treatments.

In contrast, androgen receptor inhibitors had no effect.

“This work has immediate implications for women with metastatic estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, including those resistant to current forms of endocrine therapy,” said lead researcher Theresa Hickey, Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide.

“We provide compelling new experimental evidence that androgen receptor stimulating drugs can be more effective than existing (e.g. Tamoxifen) or new (e.g. Palbociclib) standard-of-care treatments and, in the case of the latter, can be combined to enhance growth inhibition,” said Wayne Tilley, Director of the Dame Roma Mitchell Cancer Research Laboratories, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide.

Androgens were historically used to treat breast cancer, but knowledge of hormone receptors in breast tissue was rudimentary at the time and the treatment’s efficacy misunderstood.

Androgen therapy was discontinued due to virilising side effects and the advent of anti-estrogenic endocrine therapies.

While endocrine therapy is standard-of-care for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, resistance to these drugs is the major cause of breast cancer mortality.

“The new insights from this study should clarify the widespread confusion over the role of the androgen receptor in estrogen receptor driven breast cancer,” said Elgene Lim, a breast oncologist and Head of the Connie Johnson Breast Cancer Research Lab at the Garvan Institute.

“Given the efficacy of this treatment strategy at multiple stages of disease in our study, we hope to translate these findings into clinical trials as a new class of endocrine therapy for breast cancer.”

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Azim Premji and Dr Devi Shetty chosen for PCB awards

Besides them 25 senior journalists have been selected for the ‘Press Club Annual Awards’, a release said.

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Bengaluru, Jan 19: The chairman of Wipro Limited Azim Premji and the founder chairman of Narayana Health Dr Devi Prasad Shetty are among those who have been selected for the annual awards given by the Press Club of Bangalore.

Premji has been chosen for ‘Press Club Person of the Year’, while Dr Shetty and actor-Director Sudeep Sanjeev have been selected for the ‘Press Club Special Award.’

Besides them 25 senior journalists have been selected for the ‘Press Club Annual Awards’, a release said.

Chief Minister B S Yediyurappa will facilitate the awardees at a function scheduled for the third week of February, it said.

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Elizabeth Olsen: Nepotism creates fear that you don’t deserve the work you get

The actress added that she “always had this need to prove myself to everyone around me that I work really hard”, adding: “I couldn’t walk in a room without everyone already having an opinion.”

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Los Angeles, Jan 19 : Hollywood star Elizabeth Olsen says she once thought of changing her surname and distance herself from the success of her family because it was insanity growing up in the spotlight.

“It was insanity. There were times when my sisters would always be spotted and I would be in the car with them and it would really freak me out. It has helped me navigate how I want to approach my career,” said the actress, whose older sisters are Mary-Kate Olsen and Ashley Olsen.

The actress added that she “always had this need to prove myself to everyone around me that I work really hard”, adding: “I couldn’t walk in a room without everyone already having an opinion.”

Elizabeth opened up om the fears of nepotism.

“The thing about nepotism is the fear that you don’t earn or deserve the work. There was even a part of me when I was a little girl that thought if I’m gonna be an actress I’m going to go by Elizabeth Chase, which is my middle name. And then, once I started working, I was like, ‘I love my family, I like my name, I love my sisters. Why would I be so ashamed of that?’ It’s fine now,” she said.

The actress said fame has made her more of a homebody.

“Fame has also made me someone who is more of a homebody than maybe I would like to be but I know where not to go. If I could do whatever I wanted for the day, I’d start with the gym, then I’d go to the grocery store, because it’s my favourite thing,” Elizabeth told The Sun.

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