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Health

SMC issues advisory on prevention of dog bites

Highlighting the high canine population in the city, a local asked how the advisory would benefit the people.

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Srinagar, Nov 3 : Next time you are confronted by a pack of aggressive dogs in the city, the Srinagar Municipal Corporation (SMC) does not want you to run but just cross your arms over your chest and look away, the animal will become disinterested in you!

The SMC, which is often criticised of failing to control the canine menace in the city, has issued this advisory to the people living in the summer capital of the city, where an estimated 16,000 people have suffered dog bites in the past three years.

Published in local dailies here yesterday, the SMC lists various dos and don’ts in its public advisory on dog bites.

“If you are confronted by an aggressive dog, do not run away or scream at a dog. Stand still, cross your arms over your chest and look away from the dog, do not panic and let the animal sniff around you, it will quickly become disinterested and move on,” reads the advisory.

The SMC has asked the citizens to look for a “certain type of body language” in dogs when confronted.

“An aggressive dog may have a wrinkled nose that draws back to reveal its teeth, the hair along the back of its neck may be raised forming a long column along its spine, its ears may lie back, it may growl or snarl, avoid any dog displaying such signs,” the advisory reads.

While the advisory, issued by Veterinary Officer, SMC, Javaid Rather, suggests that children in the age group of four to nine years are the most common victims of dog bites, it fails to mention how a child would determine the mood of a canine especially when confronted by dogs found almost in every part of the city.

The SMC advises people to never go up to a strange dog, and to not let the children alone around a pack of stray dogs.

“Do not look directly into a dogs eyes, they take the direct eye contact as a challenge for power and control,” the advisory further suggests.

The advisory has attracted mockery from citizens and netizens alike.

“The SMC advisory in yesterday’s paper about dog menace sounds like a script from a comic show,” a Facebook user Sardar Nasir Ali Khan wrote in a post.

Another user, Naqash Sarwar, wrote, “That is ridiculous.I wanted to react to post harshly but contained myself. Instead of performing themselves and containing dog population as per norms they tell people do’s and dont’s. They don’t realise that most of the victims of dog bite are children who can’t understand this advisory.”

Highlighting the high canine population in the city, a local asked how the advisory would benefit the people.

“In a place like Srinagar where we almost live amongst dogs, how will this advisory benefit? We need action rather than such bizarre advisories,” Zahid Ahmad, a resident of downtown Srinagar, said.

However, defending the advisory, the veterinary officer said it was based upon the most scientific observations and facts by the veterinarians world over.

“These dos and don’ts are there world over and have been formulated by vets based on most scientific facts and observations,” Rather told PTI here.

He said covering one’s chest with arms is to protect one’s vital organs in case of an attack by dogs.

Rather said the parents have to be careful not to let their children alone anywhere near the places where packs of dogs can be namely around open garbage sheds.

“We should avoid dumping garbage in open places,” he said, adding parents should not be “careless” and should not go towards dogs for fun.

He said the corporation was working on multiple strategies to reduce the number of dog bites.

“Each day Srinagar generates 450 metric tonnes of garbage, which includes 200 metric tonnes of non-vegetarian waste. We are doing our best to control the accumulation of such garbage in open dumps,” he said.

Rather said while the SMC has closed about 350 open garbage dumps in the city, around 300 still remain.

“We have to close all of them and we are in the process,” he said, seeking cooperation from the residents.

Health

Decoded: How Omega-3 fatty acid helps inhibit cancer’s spread

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fish oil-WEFORNEWS

New York, July 16: While eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as fatty fish, certain nuts and seeds, have been known to prevent heart diseases and arthritis, a new research, led by one of Indian-origin, showed that omega-3 fatty byproducts may also have anti-cancer effects.

The new study, led by Aditi Das from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US, showed that when the human body metabolises omega-3 fatty acids, it produces a class of molecules called endocannabinoid epoxides, or EDP-EAs. These have anti-inflammatory properties and can inhibit cancer’s growth and spread.

The EDP-EAs have similar properties to cannabinoids found in marijuana — but without the psychotropic effects — and they target the same receptor in the body that cannabis does.

“We have a built-in endocannabinoid system which is anti-inflammatory and pain-reducing. Now we see it is also anti-cancer, stopping the cells from proliferating or migrating,” said study leader Aditi Das from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“These molecules could address multiple problems: cancer, inflammation and pain,” Das added.

For the study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the team studied the effect of the molecule in mice with tumours of osteosarcoma — a bone cancer that is not only painful but also difficult to treat.

The results showed that the endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumours and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and caused cancer cell death.

The higher concentrations of EDP-EAs did kill cancer cells, but not as effectively as other chemotherapeutic drugs on the market. But, the compounds slowed tumour growth by inhibiting new blood vessels from forming to supply the tumour with nutrients. They also prevented interactions between the cells, and most significantly, they appeared to stop cancerous cells from migrating.

While dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids can lead to EDP-EAs, for those with cancer, something concentrated and fast acting is needed, Das said.

“That’s where the endocannabinoid epoxide derivatives come into play – you could make a concentrated dose of the exact compound that’s most effective against the cancer. You could also mix this with other drugs such as chemotherapies,” she added.

IANS
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Regulation of healthcare needed to check corruption: Salman Khurshid

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Salman Khurshid

New Delhi, July 12 : Congress leader Salman Khurshid on Thursday said a strong regulatory system is needed to check widespread corruption in the Indian healthcare sector where 25 per cent of the money spent on health is lost due to fraud.

“What you need really is a profound regulatory system. Regulation is itself something that can go wrong but if we have a good clear regulatory system it will help,” he said at the launch of book “Healers or Predators? Healthcare Corruption in India”.

Khurshid said private hospitals who get land from the government are obliged to provide 30 per cent of their beds to the poor for free but these obligations are hardly met. Patients with no real ailment and hence no expenditure are admitted to account for the 30 per cent.

The former Union Law Minister also said even the judges are not familiar with what constitutes a medical malpractice.

“We could have a death because of cardiac attack as the patient was put through tests that were not advisable and all that the hospital says is pay and we will release the body. How many cases have you heard where sanctions have been imposed on such malpractice?”

The book, which highlights corruption in India’s healthcare and medical system, is a compilation of various reports written by medical doctors on the various crises plaguing the sector and edited by Samiran Nundy, Keshav Desiraju and Sanjay Nagral.

BMJ Group Non-executive Director David Berger, who first highlighted deep-rooted but widely accepted corruption in Indian healthcare, said he was struck by the lack of trust between doctors and patients that destroys the healing relationship.

BMJ, a subsidiary of the British Medical Association, is a provider of journals, clinical decision support, events and medical education.

“The solutions are upstream, not downstream. Ranting about individual doctors being corrupt is no use. As a start, the Medical Council of India (MCI) needs to be reformed or replaced by an effective system of professional regulation where doctors are held to account,” Berger said.

Gastrointestinal surgeon and writer Nundy said there is wide asymmetry of information — doctors know everything and the patients know nothing. Patients look at doctors as god or near god and it is terrible to betray that trust, he said.

He said the Indian health system is the second most corrupt sector after police, as per a report by Transparency International. As part of solution, the country needs to first accept the National Medical Commission Bill, he said.

Other panelists at the book launch expressed deep concern over the Modi government’s flagship healthcare protection scheme, popularly called Modicare, because of the lack of basic regulation of the private sector, which accounts for 70 per cent of the country’s hospitals. The government will be heavily dependent on the private sector for the success of Ayushman Bharat.

However, NITI Ayog Member Health Vinod Paul, who believes self-regulation is essential, believes in the power of technology and analytics to raise a red flag at the possible points of corruption, and then “match it with a deterrent in terms of penalties and prosecution”.

“I think in a transparent, information technology driven system using analytics and artificial intelligence gives us an additional, very powerful tool which the developed nations have used to avert cases of corruption,” he said.

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India heading for comprehensive healthcare crisis: Amartya Sen

The Medical Council of India (MCI), which aims to provide quality medical care to all Indians through promotion and maintenance of excellence in medical education, Sen blames the organisation for not only failing to perform its duties but also for its designated role of looking after medical colleges.

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Amartya Sen

India spends just a little over one per cent of its GDP on healthcare and this is leading the country into “a comprehensive healthcare crisis”, according to Nobel laureate and noted economist Amartya Sen, who has called for greater allocation on healthcare in India and highlighted what he calls “three general failures” in the country’s healthcare segment.

“The fact that India allocates only a little over 1 per cent of its gross domestic product on public healthcare contrasts sharply, for example, with nearly three times as much by China. We reap as we sow, and cannot expect to get what other countries achieve by allocating much more resources — as a proportion of their respective levels of the gross national product– to healthcare,” Sen writes in his elaborate foreword to “Healers or Predators? Healthcare Corruption in India”, which will be launched here on Thursday.

Sen, a recipient of the Bharat Ratna in 1999, further claims that the entire organisation of Indian healthcare has become “deeply flawed”, leading the country into “a comprehensive healthcare crisis”.

“Despite being one of the fastest growing economies in the world, India ranks among the poorest achievers of good health. The shortfall of India’s health achievements compared with those of, say, China or Thailand is large and has been growing larger. Even within South Asia, Bangladesh and Nepal have overtaken India in health accomplishment, including in life expectancy.

“If India’s bad record in healthcare is not much discussed in the Indian press, this neglect does not indicate the presence of a tolerable level of healthcare in India, but reflects instead the narrow reach of the Indian news media, with its traditional neglect of elementary education and healthcare,” writes the 84-year-old economist.

Sen has extensively written on welfare economics and social justice and in the given book, he also highlights the plight of patients suffering at the hands of “private caregivers”.

He says private clinics “will not budge” without “the promise of payment”. Noting that even though some public services are offered freely, Sen highlights that many critically important services are denied unless the patient can cough up demanded sums, which can be “unaffordable” for many underprivileged Indians.

Taking a dig at the Medical Council of India (MCI), which aims to provide quality medical care to all Indians through promotion and maintenance of excellence in medical education, Sen blames the organisation for not only failing to perform its duties but also for its designated role of looking after medical colleges.

“In particular, in the use of the power — and responsibility — to set up new private medical colleges, there seems to be clear evidence of fairly straightforward corruption,” he claims.

He ends the over 1,500-word foreword to this “splendid, if depressing, book” with what he calls “three general failures” in India’s healthcare segment — “the amazing neglect of primary healthcare compared with health interventions needed at later stages”; “India’s hasty and premature reliance on private healthcare, which goes hand in hand with neglect of public healthcare”; and the deficiancy of “informed public discussion on healthcare” in the country.

Published by Oxford University Press, “Healers or Predators? Healthcare Corruption in India” has been edited by by Samiran Nundy, Keshav Desiraju and Sanjay Nagral.

“This hard-hitting volume”, according to the publisher, “shows a mirror to the society and, more specifically, to those associated with the health sector — on how healers, in many cases, are shifting shape to becoming predators”.

(Saket Suman can be contacted at [email protected])

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