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Sexually aggressive people watch porn more: Study

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London, Nov 14 : Although pornography is connected with sexual aggression over time, but researchers have found that porn use could not predict sexual aggression, as people reported with sexually aggressive tendencies were more likely to watch a lot of pornography.

The research, conducted by National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway and Zagreb University in Croatia, also found that watching porn in isolation did not result in individuals acting in a sexually aggressive manner.

For the study, published in the journal Aggressive Behaviour, looked at the links between porn usage, sexual behaviour and the personality traits of 600 Croatian male high school students aged between 15 and 17-years-old, over a 20-month period.

“Taking into account the need to prevent sexual coercion among young people, and the significant association between pornography use and self-reported sexual aggressiveness at the age of 16-17 years, we suggest that school-based sexual violence prevention programmes should commence for that age group,” said study lead author Kate Dawson from NUI Galway.

Adolescence is a key stage in sexual development, where beliefs about appropriate sexual behaviour is formed.

It is well documented that many harmful behaviours manifest during adolescence, with approximately half of sexual offenders reporting their first assault during this time.

During the study, researchers found that those who watched none or very little pornography were least likely to report that they had acted in a sexually aggressive way.

The research team also found that bullying and peer pressure consistently predicted sexual aggression, with people who reported bullying or delinquency in early adolescence being more likely to report sexual aggressiveness in later adolescence.

“Intervention efforts should also address the potential contributing role of violent pornography in the reinforcement of sexually aggressive behaviour, Dawson said.

“Similarly, our findings may inform recently proposed pornography literacy programmes, which provide tools for critical interpretation of sexually explicit imagery, but also to educate that a lack of consent is never acceptable,” she added.

India

Reduce helplessness for a stable society: Sudha Murthy

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New Delhi, Dec 11 : The conversation starts with Jean Paul Sartre and ends with Ayushmann Khurrana. And she seems happy about that.

At Infosys’ guesthouse in the national capital, which shuns shouting ‘corporates’, Sudha Murthy is sitting in a small room. The larger conference hall is reserved for waiting journalists.

In town for the Penguin Annual Lecture 2019, Murthy says her many roles, including being the Chairperson of Infosys Foundation, a writer, social worker and administrator, complete her.

“I must thank my excellent support system, else it would have been tough to do justice to them all. Frankly, there is not much demand from home and I don’t socialise much — no partying, get-togethers and very rare wedding appearances,” Murthy smiles.

That gives her enough time to write, she says.

“It is after all my cherished expression that lets me talk about what I feel deeply about, my joys, the sorrows,” she says, and adds, perhaps as an afterthought, “When something comes to my mind, I finish a book within 15-20 days.”

Murthy, however, doesn’t really like the fact that most schools, except perhaps some alternative ones, pay little attention to encouraging writing or pushing students towards other art forms.

“There seems to be such a drastic change from our times when hobby classes were an integral part. Now, both schools and parents are only looking at making their kids computer proficient from an early age.

“Of course, it also has to do with the intense competition in the face of a huge population, but it would be nice if they realised that encouraging creativity at an early age works wonders later on,” she says.

As the conversation veers towards her latest book ‘The Daughter from a Wishing Tree: Unusual Tales from Women in Mythology’, the author insists that mythology, which has been written by men, does not really boast of many prominent women characters, except Sita and Draupdi.

“And this is despite the fact that several women have taken very strong and decisive decisions, which have changed dynasties. Yet, they remain unsung. The book is, therefore, about unusual women, away from the popular narrative, but extremely important,” she says.

Stating that mythology happens to be an indispensable part of Indian culture, Murthy feels that it can be the saving light in the bleakest of times.

“Once you understand that it is not to be taken literally and is open to interpretation, it serves its true purpose — taking life head-on and never getting bogged down even in the worst of times,” she says.

For Murthy, who for decades has been working with the underprivileged, the one emotion that always strikes her is helplessness.

“The moment people start feeling that, they take extreme measures. Look at the French Revolution or the Naxalite movement closer home. In order to ascertain a healthy and stable society, it is important to reduce that helplessness and that’s what I work for,” she says.

Considering the fact that she was the only girl student in her engineering class and was the first woman engineer to be hired by TATA Engineering and Locomotive Company (TELCO), does she feel that things have really changed for women?

“For educated women, yes. If you look at the southern states, the demand for dowry has come down considerably in most communities. Education, leading to financial independence, has surely made women more empowered,” Murthy says.

Not only social justice, education or poverty alleviation, Murthy knows her cinema well too.

“I am a complete movie buff who still prefers to go for the late night show and seldom watch movies at home. Nowadays, I don’t miss any films starring Ayushmann Khurrana considering the fact that he makes such sensible choices. Well, I do miss the subtle style of directors like Basu Bhattacharya and Hrishikesh Mukherjee, but really admire Vidhu Vinod Chopra’s work among the contemporary directors,” Murthy concludes.

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TMC leader Nusrat Jahan earns praise with Instagram post

The fans praised her, with one commenting: “You are amazing”. Another wrote: “Hope you helped the child!!” “Really so lovely,” one post read.

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West Bengal TMC MP Nusrat Jahan (Instagramm Pic)

New Delhi, Dec 10 : Bengali movie actress and Trinamool Congress leader Nusrat Jahan’s photograph on Instagram in which she is cuddling a little balloon-seller went viral, with people hailing her humanitarian gesture. The post got 386 comments and 50,006 likes.

The politician posted the picture on her Instagram account and wrote: “Made my weekend special… with the special one…a one-and-a-half-year-old baby selling balloons…was way more cuter and colourful than the balloons…#loveforall #loveistheonlylanguage.

The fans praised her, with one commenting: “You are amazing”. Another wrote: “Hope you helped the child!!” “Really so lovely,” one post read.

“Appreciate your loving nature. I admire you as you have a loving heart, ” one fan wrote. “God bless you. Your heart is as beautiful as your face,” commented another.

“God bless you, ma’am. You are such a nice person. A big fan,” wrote another person.

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Our ancestors learnt to smile so that they can have sex

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Ancestors smile had sex

London, Dec 10 : Believe it or not but our forefathers were way smarter than us when it came to wooing the opposite sex for mating. According to a new study, Neanderthals learnt how to smile and make expressive faces in order to attract less-aggressive mates.

Researchers from the University of Milan focused on genetic samples from Neanderthals, which showed that gene mutations might have led humans to “self-select less aggressive mating partners”.

This behaviour finally led to the “self-domestication” of ancient humans.

The study suggests that modern humans domesticated themselves after they split from their extinct relatives — Neanderthals and Denisovans — approximately 600,000 years ago, reported sciencemag.org citing the study that was published in the journal Science Advances.

Giuseppe Testa, a molecular biologist at University of Milan in Italy, and colleagues knew that one gene, BAZ1B, plays an important role in orchestrating the movements of neural crest cells.

Most people carry two copies of this gene.

Significantly, one copy of BAZ1B is missing in people with Williams-Beuren syndrome, a disorder linked to cognitive impairments and extreme friendliness.

Genetic data was gathered from human stem cells taken from the remains of two Neanderthals and one Denisovan.

These two groups of prehistoric ancestors lived around the same time and there is even evidence to suggest they interbred.

“BAZ1B” is the gene which allows dogs to make their eyes expressive in a way wolves cannot, reports NYPost.

“It is thought that selected breeding patterns of some Neanderthals led to the BAZ1B gene and could have contributed to Homo sapiens developing distinctively expressive faces”.

When the researchers looked at hundreds of BAZ1B-sensitive genes, they found that in modern humans, those genes had accumulated loads of regulatory mutations of their own.

This suggests natural selection was shaping them.

According to The Sun, Williams-Beuren syndrome causes humans to have what same people perceive as a welcoming expression with a wide mouth and a small nose.

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