Connect with us

Lifestyle

Salary hike correlated to ease of falling asleep: Survey

Published

on

salary hike stress asleep

New Delhi, March 15: Having trouble sleeping? Your salary might be one of the reasons behind it.

There is a direct correlation between increasing salary and ease of falling asleep, according to a survey.

The India Sleep and Wellness survey, released ahead of the World Sleep Day, was commissioned by Sunday Mattresses and was conducted among 345 working professionals above the age of 25, read a statement.

The survey, conducted across Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru, indicates that there is also a direct correlation between productivity and sleep.

Over two-thirds of the sound sleepers believe they are 100 per cent productive at work. whereas more than half of those who reported getting insufficient sleep, believed they were only 75 per cent (or less) productive.

People below the age group of 30 sleep better compared to those who are older. Adults over 30 are twice as likely to have sleep-related problems and adults over 45 years are three times more likely to have sleep-related issues.

Almost 40 per cent of people use an alarm to wake up. This is significantly high in Mumbai where 50 per cent of the respondents use an alarm on a daily basis.

People in Bengaluru go to bed the earliest (between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m.), whereas Mumbai has the highest proportion of night owls who sleep after midnight. Bengaluru also has a better record of falling asleep as compared to Delhi and Mumbai and this is mainly attributed to relatively lower noise levels.

The research demonstrates that people who eat less than two hours before going to sleep are 50 per cent more likely to have sleep-related issues.

IANS

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

5 natural methods to beat stress

Published

on

stress work tension

New Delhi, July 19: A study of 200,000 respondents by Optum has found that 46 per cent of the Indian workforce reports suffering from some form of stress.

Stress is the body’s natural response to pressure. It can have a negative effect on your body, mood, as well as behaviour, with wide-ranging effects like headaches, anxiety, fatigue and irritability.

The causes of stress vary from one person to the next, and so do the effects. Stress can be harmful for the body, and is the cause of many health and lifestyle problems. Managing stress should be a priority, but is often difficult to achieve due to lack of time or effective and simple methods to do so.

Dr Hariprasad, Ayurveda Expert at The Himalaya Drug Company, recommends the following natural methods to cope with stress:

Unwind with physical activity: All forms of physical activity are useful in managing stress. Exercising has many benefits such as releasing endorphins and calming the mind, with a reduction in stress levels being an added bonus. Even 45 minutes of physical activity a day goes a long way towards managing stress levels.

Organise your life: Organising one’s workload leads to a sense of control and peace of mind, and there are many ways to achieve this. One way to do this is through adopting good time management, by prioritising tasks, and scheduling time to complete them. Switching between tasks and having them pile up often becomes an additional source of stress. Decentralisation of tasks or asking for help as and when required is also a good way to reduce stress levels.

Use herbs in daily diet: Herbs like Ashvagandha have been proven to be effective in managing the negative effects of stress. According to Ayurveda texts and modern research, Ashvagandha helps reduce the damaging effects of long-term stress by rejuvenating the mind and body. It is an adaptogen that helps the body stabilise physiological processes, maintain a healthy balance between different biological systems, and support better resilience to stress.

Eat the right food: Your eating habits have a significant impact on stress levels. Following a healthy diet with a good balance of different food groups and all the required nutrients is essential. A diet rich in different food groups such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, dairy, fish, and poultry would help you get the carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins and minerals you need. A well-nourished body is better able to cope with the physical and emotional effects of stress.

Get enough sleep: Sleep is essential in stress management. Not getting enough sleep typically leads to irritability and fatigue. Oversleeping can make us sluggish, depressed — and puts our health at a higher risk. Getting the right amount of sleep, between 7-8 hours, is a good way to stay energised and effectively manage the challenges of the day.

In this busy and stressful life, these simple and natural methods can help you manage stress and maintain good mental and physical health.

IANS

Continue Reading

Fashion

How to be flight fabulous

Published

on

Airport looks
Representative Image

New Delhi, July 16: Airport looks are as important as black-tie events nowadays. So, while ensuring that outfit is on-point, let’s not forget to get a flawless beauty and hair look.

TIGI Educator Audrey D’Souza and Rashmi Shetty, Pond’s Skin Expert help you get jet-setting hair and skin.

D’Souza shares three styles for tresses trend while you are in transit.

* Scarfed hair: Headscarves are a simple accessory that make traveling in style almost too easy and the patterns and colours can help brighten up even the worst in-transit blues. Simply tie a pre-stitched hair scarf behind your ears by either back-combing or side parting your hair

* Mermaid braid: Get the base right by applying a texturing serum. Part the hair into two and work with volumizing mousse for a messy, bed head look. Maintain the tempo and take smaller sections using the Dutch braiding technique and secure the end with a black ribbon. Finish the look with a texturizing spray

* Halfsie Pony: Spritz dry shampoo onto your roots and gather half your hair into a messy. The Half-twist bun for a girl-next-door hairstyle is effortlessly chic

Shetty shares a skincare routine to cope with in-flight cabin air which causes the skin to dry very quickly:

* Before you get on the flight, it’s good to apply a good light moisturizer enriched with Vitamin E or something like a hydrating gel that quickly absorbs in the skin and is cooling on your skin

* Once on the flight, don’t neglect the lips and nails, I advise using a good cuticle oil and an oil rich lip balm to keep them from getting chapped and dry

* For long flights, it’s important not to forget to hydrate yourself along with the skin, drink water and intake lot of fluids

* Use a good serum before going to sleep, I recommend choosing a good serum that is clinically proven to boost skin’s cellular energy and reduce spots, tighten pores and even brighten skin quality.

* The right ingredients make a huge difference, the DermPerfect complex for example, contains two powerful bio-actives (Vitamin B3 and Hexyl Resorcinol) that are known to work on these skincare needs

* Before stepping out, instead of heavy makeup and foundations, I recommend using a multipurpose product like a good BB cream that almost acts like a one-step solution that gives coverage, protects skin from sun and is clinically proven to reduce spots and tighten pores and boost radiance in the skin.

IANS
Continue Reading

Blog

Once a poetic experience, sex has now become an unfulfilling encounter: Writer Seema Anand

The Arts of Seduction” (Aleph/188 pages/ Rs 499), the publisher says, will forever change the way one thinks about love and lovemaking.

Published

on

Seema Anand

She is an acknowledged authority on the Kama Sutra, and her recent book, “The Arts of Seduction”, is billed as a guide to having great sex in the 21st century. London-based mythologist and narrative practitioner Kamadevika Seema Anand laments that people are not having “great sex” these days, and that it has been reduced to an “act of instant gratification”.

Once a poetic experience“For the most part, sex is now a brief, tiresome, unfulfilling encounter, something that ‘needs to be done’. For the ancient Indians sex was a poetic experience centred on the nuances of seduction and the subtlety of exploration whereas our idea of ‘great sex’ focuses on the tiniest (and possibly the most irrelevant) part of it — the act of penetration. The ‘Kama Sutra’ holds that there is only so much one can do with the genitals. The real excitement comes from what happens before and after, from what the mind can conjure up,” Anand told IANS in an email interview.

To explain better, she asks her readers to imagine a feast of their favourite foods laid out in front of them.

“You pick up each thing separately, you savour it, you roll it around your mouth till its flavour fills your brain. Then, and only then do you move on to the next thing so that at the end of it even the memory of each taste will have the capacity to bring a smile to your face.

“Similarly, we are like a banquet of erogenous zones with an incredible capacity for pleasure, where each spot has its own sensations and its own manner of arousal — imagine the potential,” she said.

Pleasure, she said, is the bringing of each little nerve ending tingling to life — one tiny nerve at a time.

“It needs the indulgence of time and fantasy — you need to be physically, mentally and emotionally present with your lover. When was the last time you can say you did that,” she asked.

Anand reminded that “Kama Sutra” author Vatsyayan’s solution for exploring pleasure was to create variety — variety in everything.

“The only way to keep it fresh is to constantly change what we do. However, that is a challenge in itself — in our heads we can fantasise to the end of the universe and back but in terms of ‘doing’ we never vary things. So if it is the kiss then let there be 500 different types kisses to choose from, depending on the occasion — kisses that only use the lips, those that use the lips and the tongue, yet others that use the lips, the tongue and the teeth…” she quipped.

Anand said that if there was ever a time to bring back the “Kama Sutra” and its ideas, it was now.

The book, she said, began with an exploration of the incredible literary and cultural heritage which is all but lost to us. “I wanted to unravel those metaphors, to dig up the ancient myths and stories, to unsilence the narratives that made sex such a poetic experience for Ancient India. I wanted to put the seduction back into sex and reclaim the refinement and joyousness of sexual pleasure for the human race,” she said on what propelled her to write the offering.

The Arts of Seduction” (Aleph/188 pages/ Rs 499), the publisher says, will forever change the way one thinks about love and lovemaking.

The book charts several techniques and refinements that can elevate sex to “an altogether different level” — featuring innovative codes for loves messages, the effects of applying perfume to different parts of body, the many different types of kissing, and, among others, where and how to massage your lover’s feet.

(Saket Suman can be contacted at [email protected] )

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Most Popular