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Salary hike correlated to ease of falling asleep: Survey

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New Delhi, March 15: Having trouble sleeping? Your salary might be one of the reasons behind it.

There is a direct correlation between increasing salary and ease of falling asleep, according to a survey.

The India Sleep and Wellness survey, released ahead of the World Sleep Day, was commissioned by Sunday Mattresses and was conducted among 345 working professionals above the age of 25, read a statement.

The survey, conducted across Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru, indicates that there is also a direct correlation between productivity and sleep.

Over two-thirds of the sound sleepers believe they are 100 per cent productive at work. whereas more than half of those who reported getting insufficient sleep, believed they were only 75 per cent (or less) productive.

People below the age group of 30 sleep better compared to those who are older. Adults over 30 are twice as likely to have sleep-related problems and adults over 45 years are three times more likely to have sleep-related issues.

Almost 40 per cent of people use an alarm to wake up. This is significantly high in Mumbai where 50 per cent of the respondents use an alarm on a daily basis.

People in Bengaluru go to bed the earliest (between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m.), whereas Mumbai has the highest proportion of night owls who sleep after midnight. Bengaluru also has a better record of falling asleep as compared to Delhi and Mumbai and this is mainly attributed to relatively lower noise levels.

The research demonstrates that people who eat less than two hours before going to sleep are 50 per cent more likely to have sleep-related issues.

IANS

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Mushirul Hasan: Man with a mission and a vision – Obituary

He had also served as the Director General of the National Archives of India and the President of the Indian History Congress. Wherever he worked, he gave it a touch of finesse and perfection – his hallmark.

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Tears welled up my eyes, when I was told by my friend, Mohammed Wajihuddin, an eminent columnist, that not a single wreath or even a flower, was laid at the grave of Prof Mushirul Hasan by Jamia Millia Islamia, the institution that the renowned historian and the educationist had nursed as his offspring.

It is shocking to note that Jamia failed to give him the little due at his last resting place – something absolutely unbearable, said, Wajihuddin. Mushir had given the prime of his life to Jamia.

Prof Azra Razzack, who had worked under Mushir in the K.R. Narayanan Center of Dalit Studies and Minorities at Jamia Millia Islamia too felt that the Indian populace didn’t give Mushir his due.

Mushir was an institution in his own self. Having read almost all his books, Razzack said that the one which has stamped its mark on readers of history is that on Jamia Millia Islamia’s contribution in India’s freedom movement “Partners in Freedom: Jamia Millia Islamia”. A thoroughly researched book, it highlights the history of forbearance, companionship and insight within the parameters the historic Jamia Millia Islamia.

It demonstrates how personages lived for and worked towards the attainment of high morals and principles. Razzack thinks a Chair or a building in the name of Mushirul Hasan must be considered by Jamia, where he spent the prime of his life.

Having seen Mushir at close quarters for a number of years, I can state that he was a man of many lives and colours. I had known him for almost three decades. Right from my student days, I was a connoisseur of Mushirul Hasan’s books and lectures since I studied at Delhi University in the 1980s.

Not only was he a man of letters, he lived by each and every word he had written. Being a soft-spoken person, he was known never to hurt even the worst of his critics – a rare quality that Maulana Azad also possessed. Mushir might not live before us in flesh and bbody but the tremendous legacy of historicity he has left for posterity will stamp him as an immortal in the genre of writing books loaded not only with knowledge but most importantly – values and vision.

While manning Jamia Millia Islamia as its Vice Chancellor, Mushir left no stone unturned and brought it on par with the other illustrious institutions like Delhi University, BHU and Calcutta University. During his time, he turned it into a state-of- the-art university besides giving it a designer look.

He had also served as the Director General of the National Archives of India and the President of the Indian History Congress. Wherever he worked, he gave it a touch of finesse and perfection – his hallmark.

Remembering his book, “In Search of Integration and Identity – Indian Muslims since Independence”, M. Atyab Siddiqui, a Muslim thinker and Mushir’s legal advisor for a number of years, stated that he was the architect of the modern Jamia. His legacy of liberal thought and perception for the underprivileged sections of society should be carried forward. It was because of Mushir that in the comity of universities, Jamia carved its niche.

However, Siddiqui was piqued: “Mushir’s mission was to educate the beleaguered Muslim masses in the best manner possible. But it saddens me when today, I note that Jamia is in a pathetic state and requires a visionary like Mushirul Hasan to make it regain its pristine glory.”

The most noteworthy trait of Mushir’s writings was his secular credentials along with his habit of calling a spade a spade. Though the world over, he carved a niche for his books on the vivisection of India. However, his most readable book is on the Nehrus, titled, “The Nehrus – Personal Histories” – his last one.

In it, he has unquestioningly laid out the best of his feelings on Jawaharlal, Indira and Rajiv. Some of the passsages are very touching. Perhaps this seems to be a sequel of “When Stone Walls Cry: The Nehrus in Prison”. As he had a very special place for the Nehrus, he presented them as having a great capacity to gauge the pulse of the times.

Being a suave man of a few words, his magnificence was that each word he uttered had its own music and meaning that the audiences thoroughly acknowledged. Besides, wit and humour were his hallmark.

It would not be an exaggeration to say that Mushir was the son of two universities — Aligarh Muslim University (where he had studied) and Jamia Millia Islamia, that he nursed like his own child. By penning, “Aligarh’s Notre eminent contemporain-Assessing Syed Ahmad Khan’s Reformist Agenda”, Mushir paid his homage to his alma mater.

Mushir was a sensible historian. Once when he was hounded by some zealous elements for having stated that Jamia’s students were giving undue publicity to Salman Rushdie’s “Satanic Verses”, a sub-standard book, by burning it, he was attacked as he was mistaken by the motivated students. Later, he was able to impress upon them and the same people who went for his jugular became his flowers. That was Mushir’s aura and benchmark.

Today, there’s no one to match Mushir when it comes to the understanding of Islam, Muslims and Partition of India. He had told my father, Nooruddin, that the concept of a book on the 1947 Partition came to his mind when he had heard Maulana Azad state that water cannot be cut in twain egging Muslims not to vie for the so called El Dorado (Pakistan). His mammoth work, “Memories of a Fragmented Nation: Rewriting the Histories of India’s Partition” remains unmatched on the topic throughout the world.

We must continue Mushir’s vision and education for a better India.

(Firoz Bakht Ahmed is the Chancellor of Maulana Azad National Urdu University and the grandnephew of Bharat Ratna Maulana Azad. The views expressed are personal. He can be reached at [email protected])

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How to make your room look bigger than it really is

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New Delhi, Dec 8: The struggle of making your small room look bigger is so real for almost all the people. Fitting all the necessary belongings into places with a limited access to space is a tussle. Be it a dorm or an apartment, getting an adequate, big space for living is hard to find these days but not anymore.

Ankur Dhawan, CIO, Proptiger.com, and Snehil Gautam, Marketing Head, Houisng.com, list ways that can help you make any room look bigger than it really is.

* Use light colours: The reflective qualities of light colours are very well known to us. Light colour helps space open up making it light and airy.

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Try painting the room in only one colour or with different shades of the same colour so that the boundaries between the walls are not well defined which causes your eye to travel up making the ceiling seem higher than it really is. Light colour even simplifies the space making it look clutter less and emphasizes the architecture.

* Clever use of furniture: When you don’t have access to a larger space but need to cram all your worldly belongings into place, all you need to do is choose your furniture wisely.

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Opt for multifunctional furniture and incorporate clever use of contrasts of the furniture with the walls.You can even use built-in furniture to open up a space.

* Let there be light: Nothing makes a room bigger than the allowance of natural lights into your living space. Natural light opens up space and makes a room look bigger and brighter. When you paint your room in light colour and allow the natural light to penetrate into it, it reflects the light which in turn fools your eye into your room looking bigger.

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Well placed mirrors also play wonders in penetrating the light and making your room bigger and brighter.

* Keep your room clutter less: A room full of trash and clutter makes you feel claustrophobic. One of the major changes you need to incorporate in the process of making your room bigger is the cutting down of the mess.

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Get rid of all the unwanted things you’re not in need of right now and try placing your necessary items in an organized manner.

* Use same colour or small print fabrics: Pick fabrics of the same colour or select small-printed fabrics for your room. If you choose large-printed fabrics, it’ll make your room look smaller and a bit messed up, no matter how well-organized you keep it.

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* Make your ceilings pop with bright colours: Paint your ceilings with brighter colours than that of the walls. This trick keeps your attention towards the ceiling making the ceiling look higher.

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Essentially, keep your interior simple and go for simpler accessories to deceive your eyes into your room looking wider than it really is.

IANS

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Longer shifts at workplace can increase your error rates: Survey

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New Delhi, Dec 6: If you thought that working long hours may help you please your boss, think twice. According to a survey, people who work longer shifts typically make nine per cent more errors than those on shorter shifts.

This demonstrates that attention spans drift over a long work day, says a survey by Global software firm Pegasystems Inc, while revealing how ineffective software and poor processes are hindering productivity for many workers.

The survey found that workers are saddled with too many of disconnected apps, leading to poor processes, increased errors, and wasted actions that could otherwise be automated.

From digital distractions to extraneous activities, there are many events over the course of the day that take workers’ attention away from productive tasks.

Workers check their email 10 times per hour, or once every six minutes, throughout the course of their day.

Employees spend 13 per cent of their time on email, of which only 23 per cent is spent on value-generating work.

On average, workers perform 134 “copy and paste” actions each day — highlighting how often employees must switch between applications using same data to complete a task.

“Many organisations instinctively try to solve process issues and improve employee productivity by throwing more software at the problem without truly understanding the root cause of their inefficiencies,” said Don Schuerman, CTO, Pegasystems, in a statement on Wednesday.

Employees commit 845 keying errors per day or once out of every 14 key strokes, which shows the potential to automate more of their workflow to reduce manual mistakes.

Workers multitasking between 30 applications or more in a single shift have a 28 per cent higher error rate than those using fewer apps.

“By streamlining these processes and eliminating repetitive tasks, companies can give employees the right tools they need to succeed and be happier in their jobs,” Schuerman said.

The survey is based on the analysis of nearly five million hours of desktop activity of operational support employees — who primarily perform routine back office, data entry, or contact center tasks — at Global 2000 companies from January to September.

IANS

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