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Revenge killing or staged encounter? The synopsis of “Gangs of Jaunpur”

“I want to tell UP CM Adityanath ji that my husband’s life is in danger. A conspiracy is being hatched to kill him in a fake encounter.”

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munna bajrangi murder

Prem Prakash Singh, alias Gangster Munna Bajrangi, who was imprisoned for killing Krishnand Rai, a BJP MLA, was shot dead inside the Baghpat jail premises in Uttar Pradesh on Monday. The shocking incident inside the high security prison took place in the morning around 6.30 at the District Jail, Baghpat when prisoners came out for their morning tea.

Munna Bajrangi was transferred hardly 24 hours ago under a tight security from Jhansi to Baghpat jail and was to be produced in a local court on Monday. He was allegedly shot dead by another gangster Sunil Rathi inside Baghpat jail, hours before he was to be produced in a local court in an extortion case of a former BSP legislator. He was lodged in the prison for allegedly killing the BJP MLA Krishnanand Rai in 2005.

Additional DG (Law and Order) Anand Kumar while briefing to media said, “As many as 10 used cartridges, 2 magazines and 22 live cartridges have been recovered.” The weapon, used in the murder was a 0.762 imported pistol which was later on recovered from a drain.

Bajrangi, a class 5 dropout was a 51 year old notorious gangster from Jaunpur of Eastern Uttar Pradesh. He came into the world of crime at a young age of 17 after being booked for possessing illegal arms. He later joined Gajraj Singh’s gang in Jaunpur to make a mark in the world of crime. Munna Bajrangi came into the limelight when he carried out his first major crime in 1984 after he killed a businessman. He also allegedly murdered BJP leader Ramchandra Singh. Bajrangi, was considered the right-hand man of another dreaded gangster Mukhtar Ansari whose influence run all over entire eastern Uttar Pradesh. Mukhtar Ansari is a mafia don-turned-politician who joined politics in 1996 after he became an MLA from Mau on a Samajwadi Party (SP) ticket. Bajrangi as an important member of Ansari gang ran his extortion business and grabbed government contracts.

The gang rivalry between Ansari and Brijesh Singh, another gangster in the region, led to the murder of BJP leader Krishnanand Rai. Rai was giving protection to Brijesh Singh which was proving a big hurdle in Ansari’s criminal activities. In 2001, Brijesh Singh and his gang members ambushed the Mukhtar Ansari gang on Mau-Lucknow highway and three gang members from each side died in the crossfire.

Image result for munna bajrangi yogi adityanath

Rai was murdered in the broad daylight by Bajrangi and his gang in 2005. The gangster from Jainpur reportedly pumped 100 bullets in BJP MLA’s body and as many as six AK-47 rifles were used. After that incident, it became difficult for Bajrangi to remain in UP and to evade arrest Bajrangi left Uttar Pradesh and tried to spread his network in Delhi threatening the local businessmen. He was on run and reportedly took shelter in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Chhatisgarh, Daman, Rajasthan, Orissa, West Bengal and Bihar besides Nepal and other Gulf countries.

Four years after BJP MLA’s killing and announcement of Rs 7 lakh reward on his arrest, the crime branch of Delhi police traced his movement in Malad area of Mumbai and finally on September 16, 2009, the team located his hideout and picked up one of his associates called Mahender aka Shetty aka Bala. He spilled the beans and told about Bajrangi’s whereabouts and subsequently a trap was laid and he was arrested from Mumbai -Surat Highway near Chinchoti. It is believed that fearing an encounter, Bajrangi himself planned his arrest and since then, he has been kept in different jails. Bajrangi had claimed that he had killed at least 40 people in a span of 20 years.

Sources said that a leader from Eastern UP, who thought Bajrangi and Mokhtar’s gang as a potential threat to the Party in the region, particularly after Bajrangi orchestrated killing of series of BJP leader, was looking for an opportunity to eliminate Bajrangi. Besides Bajrangi, his mentor Mokhtar’s family also apprehended that the don will be eliminated in Banda jail and made a request to shift him to Lucknow jail.

Bajrangi also dabbled briefly in politics when he fought in the assembly elections of Uttar Pradesh in 2012 while being imprisoned in the Tihar Jail. He fought from Mariyahu as a joint candidate of Apna Dal and the Peace Party and came third, polling 12 % lesser votes than the winner Shraddha Yadav of Samajwadi Party.

It may be interesting to mention that Bajrangi wanted to become a gangster like those shown in Bollywood films. As per police records, he committed his first murder in 1984 and within days he murdered a BJP leader Ramchandra Singh, who was a local block Pramukh.

Munna Bajrangi, once had a close save and escaped death when the Delhi police and Special Task Force (STF) of Uttar Pradesh shifted him to hospital after firing 10 bullets in his body on September 11, 1998, but he later survived the attack but after a gap of 20 years he wasn’t as lucky and fell prey to bullets by another listed gangster of Western Uttar Pradesh Sunil Rathi and that too in judicial custody.

Parkash Singh, who served as DGP of UP from 1991 to 1993, told FinancialExpress.com that state government must set up an inquiry to ascertain if the jail authorities were behind the conspiracy to kill the mafia Don. He also called for urgent reforms in the manner in which jail security is dealt with. He added that there is a need for urgent reforms to address the several issues that are going inside our jails.

Seema Singh, wife of slained Gangster while talking to the press on 29th June had said, “I want to tell UP CM Adityanath ji that my husband’s life is in danger. A conspiracy is being hatched to kill him in a fake encounter.” Last year, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath had ordered the transfer of 48 criminals from their present jails to other prisons across the state. Bajrangi, along with gangster-turned-politician Mukhtar Ansari, was one of them. Munna Bajrangi was that time transferred to Pilibhit jail.

A needle of suspicion points towards the present Govt because the dead gangster had no direct rivalry with Sunil Rathi as they met for the first time less than 24 hours ago. Now the questions which should be investigated by the probing team is whether the killing was purely because of Bajrangi’s increased clout in the Western UP crime world or whether someone close to power had orchestrated his killing inside the jail by conveniently using another gang lord to avenge some old killings by Bajrangi.

According to a reliable source, the killing of Bajrangi was planned at the behest of a senior saffron leader to avenge the series of sensational murders of Bharatiya Janta Party leaders, by Munna Bajrangi and his mentor, Mukhtar Ansari.

A judicial inquiry into the incident has been ordered by the state Govt and the jailor has also been suspended. Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath said. “Such an incident occurring inside the jail premises is a serious matter. We will conduct an in-depth investigation and a strict action will be taken against those responsible,” Though, it’s normal on the part of Chief Minister to make such a politically correct statement, we wonder if the conspiracy behind the killing of Munna Bajrangi will be ever known.

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Lakhs of towels, bedhseets missing from AC coaches – passengers are suspects

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

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Indian Railway Bed Rolls

New Delhi, Nov 15 : Affluent AC passengers are the prime suspects as over 21 lakh towels, bedsheets, blankets and other items went missing from air-conditioned coaches during 2017-18 an official said.

The passengers are suspected to have made off with precisely 21,72,246 “bedroll items” — including 12,83,415 hand towels, 4,71,077 bedsheets and 3,14,952 pillow covers — from trains across the country in the last fiscal.

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

“Together, the missing items are estimated to cost over Rs 14 crore,” a senior Railway Ministry official told IANS.

While the theft of toilet mugs, taps, flush pipes and mirrors are also reported on a regular basis, the missing bedroll items in substantial numbers has posed a challenge for the Railways, which is trying to provide better amenities to upper class passengers.

Currently, about 3.9 lakh sets of linen are provided daily — this comprises two bedsheets, a towel, a pillow and a blanket for each passenger in the AC classes.

“The maximum number of items stolen are towels, followed by bedsheets, as reported by coach attendants at the end of each journey,” the official said.

In the light of the thefts, especially of towels, the Railways has decided that the face towels given to passengers travelling in air-conditioned coaches will be replaced with cheaper, smaller, disposable, takeaway napkins, said the official.

The Railways has already started changing the cover of blankets in some sections while the frequency of washing is being increased from monthly to fortnightly and weekly.

There is also a move to increase the frequency of washing of blankets to begin with and replacing the existing ones with the newly designed lightweight blankets made of soft fabric in a phased manner.

The plan envisages improvement of linen management with the aim of providing clean, hygienic and good quality linen to passengers travelling in AC classes, the official said.

Among the 16 zones of Indian Railways, the Southern zone alone accounted for the theft of 2,04,113 hand towels, 29,573 bedsheets, 44,868 pillow covers, 3,713 pillows and 2,745 blankets.

In the missing list, South Central zone has registered 95,700 towels, 29,747 pillow covers, 22,323 bedsheets, 3,352 blankets and 2,463 pillows.

In the Northern zone, 85,327 towels, 38,916 bedsheets, 25,313 pillow covers, 3,224 pillows and 2,483 blankets were found missing.

In the East Central zone, 33,234 bedsheets, 22,769 pillow covers, 1,657 pillows, 76,852 towels, and 3,132 blankets were stolen last year.

In the Eastern zone, 1,31,313 towels, 20,258 bedsheets, 9,006 pillow covers, 1,517 pillows and 1,913 blankets were reported missing by attendants after the end of the train journey.

The East Coast railways has registered 43,318 towels, 23,197 bedsheets, 8,060 pillow covers, and 2,260 blankets as missing.

(Arun Kumar Das can be contacted at [email protected])

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Lakhs of towels, bedhseets missing from AC coaches – passengers are suspects

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indian-railways

New Delhi, Nov 15: Affluent AC passengers are the prime suspects as over 21 lakh towels, bedsheets, blankets and other items went missing from air-conditioned coaches during 2017-18 an official said.

The passengers are suspected to have made off with precisely 21,72,246 “bedroll items” — including 12,83,415 hand towels, 4,71,077 bedsheets and 3,14,952 pillow covers — from trains across the country in the last fiscal.

Besides, the Railways found 56,287 pillows and 46,515 blankets missing from the AC coaches in this period.

“Together, the missing items are estimated to cost over Rs 14 crore,” a senior Railway Ministry official told IANS.

While the theft of toilet mugs, taps, flush pipes and mirrors are also reported on a regular basis, the missing bedroll items in substantial numbers has posed a challenge for the Railways, which is trying to provide better amenities to upper class passengers.

Currently, about 3.9 lakh sets of linen are provided daily — this comprises two bedsheets, a towel, a pillow and a blanket for each passenger in the AC classes.

“The maximum number of items stolen are towels, followed by bedsheets, as reported by coach attendants at the end of each journey,” the official said.

In the light of the thefts, especially of towels, the Railways has decided that the face towels given to passengers travelling in air-conditioned coaches will be replaced with cheaper, smaller, disposable, takeaway napkins, said the official.

The Railways has already started changing the cover of blankets in some sections while the frequency of washing is being increased from monthly to fortnightly and weekly.

There is also a move to increase the frequency of washing of blankets to begin with and replacing the existing ones with the newly designed lightweight blankets made of soft fabric in a phased manner.

The plan envisages improvement of linen management with the aim of providing clean, hygienic and good quality linen to passengers travelling in AC classes, the official said.

Among the 16 zones of Indian Railways, the Southern zone alone accounted for the theft of 2,04,113 hand towels, 29,573 bedsheets, 44,868 pillow covers, 3,713 pillows and 2,745 blankets.

In the missing list, South Central zone has registered 95,700 towels, 29,747 pillow covers, 22,323 bedsheets, 3,352 blankets and 2,463 pillows.

In the Northern zone, 85,327 towels, 38,916 bedsheets, 25,313 pillow covers, 3,224 pillows and 2,483 blankets were found missing.

In the East Central zone, 33,234 bedsheets, 22,769 pillow covers, 1,657 pillows, 76,852 towels, and 3,132 blankets were stolen last year.

In the Eastern zone, 1,31,313 towels, 20,258 bedsheets, 9,006 pillow covers, 1,517 pillows and 1,913 blankets were reported missing by attendants after the end of the train journey.

The East Coast railways has registered 43,318 towels, 23,197 bedsheets, 8,060 pillow covers, and 2,260 blankets as missing.

IANS

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India’s higher education system needs drastic changes to address tech-induced challenges

Further, India’s GER for the male population is 26.3 per cent and 25.4 per cent for females. The GER also varies across different social groups — 21.8 per cent for the Scheduled Castes and 15.9 per cent for the Scheduled Tribes.

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As the world stands on the brink of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, powered by a wide range of new technology breakthroughs such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), advanced robotics, Internet of Things IoT), Cloud computing and 3D printing, major changes are expected in the labour market globally.

There will be reduced demand for middle-skilled workers doing repetitive tasks and increased demand for more highly-skilled workers — and also low-skilled workers doing non-routine work. While many developed countries, such as the US and Japan, as also several European economies, are already experiencing this polarisation, the labour market is also hollowing out in many developing countries, although at a rate slower than the developed world.

In the case of India, this polarisation can be seen in the organised manufacturing sector, where the share of high-skilled occupations in total manufacturing employment increased by more than three percentage points, while the share of middle-skilled jobs decreased by 6.3 percentage points from 1993-94 to 2011-12. Looking at the impact of technological progress on various manufacturing industries, the capital-intensive industries, such as automobile manufacturers, have a greater probability of adopting advanced automation and robotic technologies, compared to labour-intensive manufacturing industries such as textile, apparel, leather and footwear, and paper manufacturers.

Further, in the services sector, particularly in the IT sector, e-commerce, banking and financial services and health care services, there is a huge potential for automation technologies, which would increase the demand for skilled workers and reduce the demand for middle-skilled workers.

However, in India, over 80 per cent of the working population is engaged in low-skilled jobs in the unorganised sector. These low-skilled workers aspire to join the middle-skilled workforce in the organised sector to raise themselves from poverty. However, the changing nature of work due to technology advancements in the organised sector prevents their upward labour mobility and any improvement in their incomes.

Addressing these challenges requires reforms in India’s higher education system. The institutes of higher learning should shun dated teaching methodologies and redesign the course curriculum by understanding key market transitions amidst the technological advancements. This would enable the country to create a workforce which could be placed in the positions demanded by the companies in the digital era and thus bridge the skill gap in the labour market.

However, looking at the current state of higher education in India, one can see that it is not just the quality of the system which needs to be improved. There is also much to be done in terms of the number of students enrolled in the institutes of higher learning. The Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) in tertiary education in India is 26.9 per cent, which is lower than that of China (48.4 per cent), Indonesia (27.9 per cent) and the Philippines (35.3 per cent), among others.

Further, India’s GER for the male population is 26.3 per cent and 25.4 per cent for females. The GER also varies across different social groups — 21.8 per cent for the Scheduled Castes and 15.9 per cent for the Scheduled Tribes.

There are also wide variations in the number of colleges for higher education across different states in India, with the lowest number of seven colleges in Bihar for every 0.1 million of eligible population to 51 in Telangana and Karnataka. The top eight states in terms of highest number of colleges are Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Madhya Pradesh, which have 28 or more colleges per 0.1 million of the population. The disparity in the distribution of the colleges is also seen across different districts in these states, with the top 50 districts having about 32.6 per cent of the colleges.

In addition to the inequalities existing in the access to institutions for higher education, another issue is that a majority of the students are enrolled in undergraduate level programmes, compared to the Masters and the Doctoral programmes. Moreover, at the undergraduate level, there is a low pass-out rate — out of 2,90,16,350 students enrolled at undergraduate level, only 6,419,639 passed-out in 2017.

It is imperative for the country to address these issues given that the Indian system of higher education faces multiple challenges of low gross enrollment in its colleges and universities, with predominance of students settling on undergraduate studies, along with various socio-economic inequalities existing in access to higher learning. Further, emphasis must be placed on increasing the number of students who pass out of the colleges/universities, along with increasing enrollment numbers.

The technology-induced skill gap which the Indian economy is facing across different sectors is bound to widen with the current higher education system. Change has to be brought from outside the existing constructs. Improvement in the teaching methodology from the traditional lecture courses, accreditation of online courses, along with redesigning the course curriculum to be more industry relevant are some of the ways the technology-led changes in the labour market can be dealt with.

(Amit Kapoor is chair, Institute for Competitiveness, India. The views expressed are personal. He can be contacted at [email protected] and tweets @kautiliya. Deepti Mathur, senior researcher at large, Institute for Competitiveness has contributed to the article)

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