Researchers explain why cancer risk is higher in males | WeForNews | Latest News, Blogs Researchers explain why cancer risk is higher in males – WeForNews | Latest News, Blogs
Connect with us

Lifestyle

Researchers explain why cancer risk is higher in males

Published

on

DC-stem-cells-and-cancer
Representative Images

London, DNA differences between men and women may explain why cancer risk is higher in males, according to a new study.

In findings published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers have reported that loss of function in certain genes of the sex-determining Y chromosome, which is present only in men, may cause them to have an elevated risk for cancer.

Using data from 9,000 individuals, the researchers studied Y-chromosome gene function in patients with various types of cancer. The findings showed that cancer risk increases with loss of function of six key Y-chromosome genes in various types of cells.

“Recent studies have shown that complete loss of the Y chromosome, which is essential to foetal sex differentiation, occurs, with aging, in the cells of some men,” said study author Juan Ramon Gonzalez from Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

“Although the loss of the Y chromosome has previously been associated with higher incidence of cancer, the causes of this association are poorly understood,” Gonzalez added.

These six Y-chromosome genes are involved in cell-cycle regulation, the failure of which can lead to tumour development.

According to the study, understanding the biological differences between men and women in cancer is crucial for the development of personalised lines of treatment and prevention.

“Men are not only at higher risk of cancer than women, they also face a worse prognosis. In fact, these differences partially account for the lower life expectancy of men,” Gonzalez added.

According to the researchers, although men may be more exposed to carcinogens due to the type of work they do and at higher risk because they are less likely to consult a doctor, the study has shown that there are also biological factors that increase cancer risk among men.

“In fact, it seems that one of these factors can be found in the Y chromosome, the very essence of maleness,” said study lead author Alejandro Caceres.

Suppression of the Y chromosome can occur as a result of loss of function in the chromosome, which would explain previous findings, or as a result of other mechanisms mediated by the chemical (epigenetic) inactivation of the same regions, the research said.

“Certain environmental exposures, for example to tobacco or other harmful substances, could affect chromosome function and lead to epigenetic modifications,” Gonzalez said.

Cities

Delhi violence: Saved by Hindu neighbour, recalls Muslim survivor

“One person was locked inside his car and the vehicle set afire in front of my eyes. I narrowly escaped death. I think the rioters come from the Uttar Pradesh border.

Published

on

By

Hindu Muslim Delhi Violence
Delhi Violence: Shahbaz (L) and Vikas (R) mourn the death of their friend Rohit Solanki who was shot in the neck.

New Delhi, Feb 28 : Amid the mayhem witnessed in northeast Delhi, another tale of humanity and compassion getting the better of bigotry and hate was scripted, which was narrated by a Muslim resident of Shiv Vihar on Friday — how his Hindu neighbour saved his and his family’s life.

“Around 9 am on Tuesday, a mob of at least 500 persons arrived in our locality and burnt down my car. Since were were no more safe, I escaped along with my wife and children and took refuge in a Hindu brother’s house in the neighbourhood even as the mob burnt alive my older brother who lived nearby,” Saleem Kassar, 48, told IANS.

“The neighbour kept us in his house for the night. The next day, he and his wife helped me and my wife dress up as Hindus. While he applied a ’tilak’ on my forehead, his wife put vermilion and coloured dot on my wife’s forehead. Then only did we step out and took refuge in Mustafabad area,” he said.

Kassar said his dead brother, 52, was the only bread earner of his family, including a married daughter and a visually impaired son-in-law, who lost his eyesight four years ago, and their two children.

The survivor said that the violence in northeast Delhi was worse than that witnessed in 1984 against the Sikhs after the assassination of then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.

He said three others were also killed in Shiv Vihar. “One person was locked inside his car and the vehicle set afire in front of my eyes. I narrowly escaped death. I think the rioters come from the Uttar Pradesh border. A few were from Shiv Vihar itself, who are history sheeters. All had their faces covered with cloths or helmets,” Kassar said.

(Sfoorti Mishra can be contacted at [email protected])

Continue Reading

India

Stressed over board exams? Spend 10 mins daily with nature

They found that 10-50 minutes in natural spaces was the most effective to improve mood, focus and physiological markers like blood pressure and heart rate.

Published

on

students with nature

New York, Feb 26 : Amid the ongoing board exams, spending as little as 10 minutes in a natural setting like the neighbourhood park can help students feel happier and lessen the effects of both physical and mental stress, say researchers.

The team from Cornell University in the US found that 10-50 minutes in natural spaces was the most effective to improve mood, focus and physiological markers like blood pressure and heart rate.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, aims to provide an easily-achievable dosage that physicians can prescribe as a preventive measure against high levels of stress, anxiety, depression and other mental health issues college students face.

“It doesn’t take much time for the positive benefits to kick in — we’re talking 10 minutes outside in a space with nature,” said study lead author Gen Meredith from the Cornell University.

“We firmly believe that every student, no matter what subject or how high their workload, has that much discretionary time each day, or at least a few times per week,” Meredith added.

For the findings, the research team reviewed studies that examined the effects of nature on people of college age (no younger than 15, no older than 30) to discover how much time students should be spending outside and what they should be doing while they’re there.

They found that 10-50 minutes in natural spaces was the most effective to improve mood, focus and physiological markers like blood pressure and heart rate.

“It’s not that there’s a decline after 50 minutes, but rather that the physiological and self-reported psychological benefits tend to plateau after that,” said study co-author Donald Rakow.

To enjoy the positive effects of being outside, students need only to be sitting or walking, the two primary activities the researchers examined in an effort to provide accessible recommendations.

“This is an opportunity to challenge our thinking around what nature can be. It is really all around us: trees, a planter with flowers, a grassy quad or a wooded area,” Meredith said.

The impetus for this work is a movement toward prescribing time in nature as a way to prevent or improve stress and anxiety, while also supporting physical and mental health outcomes.

Continue Reading

Fashion

Foreigners feel ‘blessed’ to see Taj the day Trump visited

At many places on the route, the administration had made several statues of animals with flowers.

Published

on

By

Foreigners at Agra

Agra, Feb 24 : The foreign tourists who arrived in this historic city on Monday to see Taj Mahal said they were “lucky” and “felt blessed” to visit the 17th century monument on the day of US President Donald Trump’s visit.

The US President, who earlier in the day arrived at Ahmedabad and was received by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, also announced a $3 billion chopper deal.

He landed here around 4.20 p.m. He was received by Governor Anandiben Patel and Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath at the Kheria airport.

Keith Clarke, a tourist from England, told IANS, “It’s my first visit to Agra, and India.” After reaching New Delhi three days ago, he arrived at Agra on Sunday night. When asked if he saw Taj Mahal, Clarke said, “Of course, I visited Taj in the morning before the US President’s arrival.”

Another foreign tourists, Sua Clarke said she was amazed as the US President was coming the same day to see Taj Mahal. Sua, in her late 50’s, said it was her first visit to India and was stunned by the cleanliness of the city.

On folk artists’ performance in the city, she said, “We loved the performance. And they too were enjoying while performing.” Artists’ performance was part of programme to welcome the First US Couple.

Alan, who also arrived here from the UK, said it was a lovely experience to find the Taj Mahal cleaned properly. “I heard that the Taj’s mausoleum were cleaned and the fresh mud wrapping were put on the graves of emperor (Shahjahan) and empress (Mumtaz),” he said.

Catherine Caley, also among the group, said her first visit to India had become memorable. “My trip to Agra and the Taj is one of the best moments of my life as before getting married I saw the monument on the day when the US President visited the historic site on same day along with his family.”

To welcome the US First Family here, the city was given a massive facelift. The administration put up huge billboards, placards, cut-outs and posters welcoming Trump and Melania.

The 13-km route from the airport to Taj Mahal had been spruced up aesthetically. The Indian and the US flags had been put up at round-abouts to give the area a festive look.

At many places on the route, the administration had made several statues of animals with flowers.

The walls were adorned with paintings reflecting the Brij culture and architectural heritage of Agra, Victorian-style lamp posts installed and the lawns of the Taj bedecked with colourful blooms.

(Anand Singh can be contacted at [email protected])

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Most Popular