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More than 60,000 people have applied to volunteer for the coronavirus vaccine trials in Moscow and over 700 people have been injected with the coronavirus vaccine, the media reported

Sputnik V, an adenovirus vector-based vaccine, was developed by the Gamaleya Scientific Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, along with the Russian Direct Investment Fund and registered on August 11.

Over 60,000 people have signed up as volunteers, several thousand people have passed the required medical tests to be registered as potential candidates for carrying out the tests,” Mayor Sergei Sobyanin was quoted as saying in reports on Sunday.

According to Russian Tass news agency, more than 700 people have been injected with the coronavirus vaccine.

“All of them are feeling good,” Sobyanin said.

The vaccine was developed on a platform that had been used for a number of other vaccines.

On August 15, the Russian Health Ministry announced the launch of the vaccine production.

The Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF) and Dr Reddy’s Laboratories Limited, a global pharmaceutical company headquartered in India, have also agreed to cooperate on clinical trials and distribution of Sputnik V Covid-19 vaccine in India.

“On regulatory approval in India, RDIF shall supply to Dr Reddy’s 100 million doses of the vaccine. The Sputnik V vaccine, which is based on well-studied human adenoviral vector platform with proven safety, is undergoing clinical trials for the coronavirus pandemic,” said a statement from the fund.

The Russian Direct Investment Fund said that the deliveries could potentially begin in late 2020 subject to completion of successful trials and registration of the vaccine by regulatory authorities in India.

Earlier this month, a study published in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet said a Russian Covid-19 vaccine has shown no serious side effects and elicited an immune response in early human trials.

Disaster

Long-Term Exposure To Air Pollution Can Contribute To Mortality In Covid Cases: Top Medical Body ICMR

Every winter, the air quality in north India, including in Delhi, dips to a dangerous low. Experts have warned that high levels of air pollution can aggravate the COVID-19 pandemic.

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New Delhi: Studies in Europe and the US have established that long-term exposure to air pollution can contribute to mortality in COVID-19 cases, ICMR Director General Balram Bhargava said on Tuesday.

He stressed that studies have found “virus particles remain suspended with PM 2.5 particulate matter, but they are not active viruses”.

“There have been studies in Europe and the US, where they have looked at polluted areas and compared mortality during lockdown and correlation with pollution… they found that pollution is clearly contributing to mortality in COVID-19 and that’s well established by these studies,” Mr Bhargava said at a press conference.

Every winter, the air quality in north India, including in Delhi, dips to a dangerous low. Experts have warned that high levels of air pollution can aggravate the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is well-proven that pollution is related to mortality, Mr Bhargava said and asserted that the most inexpensive prevention for COVID-19 and pollution is rapid and widespread adoption of wearing masks.

He said in some cities with high pollution levels, people wear masks even when there is no pandemic.

“Following COVID-appropriate behaviour, be it wearing masks, maintaining social distancing, respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene, do not cost us anything. Wearing a mask has a double advantage as it can protect one from COVID-19 as well as from pollution,” the ICMR chief said.

About the spread of coronavirus infection among children in India, he said the country’s overall figure show that of the total COVID-19 positive cases, only eight per cent are below the age of 17.

“For those below five years, the figure would be probably less than one per cent,” Mr Bhargava said, adding there is some evidence that children “can be spreaders, rather super-spreaders”.

Long-Term Exposure To Air Pollution Can Contribute To Mortality In Covid Cases: Top Medical Body ICMR
Every winter, the air quality in north India, including in Delhi, dips to a dangerous low. (File)

New Delhi: Studies in Europe and the US have established that long-term exposure to air pollution can contribute to mortality in COVID-19 cases, ICMR Director General Balram Bhargava said on Tuesday.
He stressed that studies have found “virus particles remain suspended with PM 2.5 particulate matter, but they are not active viruses”.

“There have been studies in Europe and the US, where they have looked at polluted areas and compared mortality during lockdown and correlation with pollution… they found that pollution is clearly contributing to mortality in COVID-19 and that’s well established by these studies,” Mr Bhargava said at a press conference.

Every winter, the air quality in north India, including in Delhi, dips to a dangerous low. Experts have warned that high levels of air pollution can aggravate the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is well-proven that pollution is related to mortality, Mr Bhargava said and asserted that the most inexpensive prevention for COVID-19 and pollution is rapid and widespread adoption of wearing masks.

He said in some cities with high pollution levels, people wear masks even when there is no pandemic.

“Following COVID-appropriate behaviour, be it wearing masks, maintaining social distancing, respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene, do not cost us anything. Wearing a mask has a double advantage as it can protect one from COVID-19 as well as from pollution,” the ICMR chief said.

About the spread of coronavirus infection among children in India, he said the country’s overall figure show that of the total COVID-19 positive cases, only eight per cent are below the age of 17.

“For those below five years, the figure would be probably less than one per cent,” Mr Bhargava said, adding there is some evidence that children “can be spreaders, rather super-spreaders”.

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In response to a question, Mr Bhargava said that India, so far, has not reported any cases of Kawasaki disease among COVID-19 patients.
Kawasaki is an auto-immune disease that affects children who are less than five years and presents with fever, thrombocytosis and a condition in which the arteries of the heart become dilated.

“It is less common in India. This has been described with COVID-19 in different parts of the world. I don’t think we have had any experience of Kawasaki with COVID-19 in India so far. It is a very rare condition,” Mr Bhargava said.

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No Death From Dengue This Year In Delhi, Campaign A Success: Minister

According to the data, the number of dengue cases in October stood at 223; in September it was 188 and in August 47.

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Satyendar Jain

New Delhi: Delhi Health Minister Satyendar Jain on Tuesday said no dengue-related death has been reported in the national capital this year and credited the Arvind Kejriwal government’s anti-dengue campaign for this.

In a tweet in Hindi, he also shared a data sheet prepared by the Directorate General of Health Services, according to which, 489 dengue cases have been recorded this year in Delhi till October 24.

“Delhi people did it! No death due to dengue this year. There is also a sharp fall in number of cases compared to figures reported last year. Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal’s campaign ”10 hafte 10 baje 10 minute” has been made a success by you all,” Mr Jain tweeted.

According to the data, the number of dengue cases in October stood at 223; in September it was 188 and in August 47.

The year 2017 saw 4,726 cases of dengue with 10 fatalities, 2018 saw 2,798 cases with four deaths and in 2019, as many as 2,036 cases with two deaths were reported, according to the DGHS data.

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Health

Air pollution ups COVID-19 deaths by 15% worldwide: Study

In a major global study, researchers have revealed that long-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to 15 per cent of COVID-19 deaths worldwide

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In a major global study, researchers have revealed that long-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to 15 per cent of COVID-19 deaths worldwide.

According to the study, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, in Europe the proportion was about 19 per cent, in North America it was 17 per cent, and in East Asia about 27 per cent.

“Since the numbers of deaths from COVID-19 are increasing all the time, it’s not possible to give exact or final numbers of COVID-19 deaths per country that can be attributed to air pollution,” said study author Jos Lelieveld from Max Planck Institute in Germany.

“However, as an example, in the UK there have been over 44,000 coronavirus deaths and we estimate that the fraction attributable to air pollution is 14 per cent, meaning that more than 6,100 deaths could be attributed to air pollution,” Lelieveld added.

The researchers used epidemiological data from the previous US and Chinese studies of air pollution and COVID-19 and the SARS outbreak in 2003, supported by additional data from Italy.

They combined this with satellite data showing global exposure to polluting fine particles known as ‘particulate matter’ that is less than or equal to 2.5 microns in diameter (known as PM2.5) to create a model to calculate the fraction of coronavirus deaths that could be attributable to long-term exposure to PM2.5.

The results are based on epidemiological data collected up the third week in June 2020 and the researchers said that a comprehensive evaluation will need to follow after the pandemic has subsided.

Estimates for individual countries show, for example, that air pollution contributed to 29 per cent of coronavirus deaths in the Czech Republic, 27 per cent in China, 26 per cent in Germany, 22 per cent in Switzerland, 21 per cent in Belgium, 19 per cent in The Netherlands, 15 per cent in Italy and 14 per cent in the UK.

Referring to previous work that suggests that the fine particulates in air pollution may prolong the atmospheric lifetime of infectious viruses and help them to infect more people. Lelieveld said: “It’s likely that particulate matter plays a role in ‘super-spreading events’ by favouring transmission.”

According to the researchers, the particulate matter seems to increase the activity of a receptor on cell surfaces, called ACE-2, that is known to be involved in the way COVID-19 infects cells.

“So, we have a ‘double hit’: air pollution damages the lungs and increases the activity of ACE-2, which in turn leads to enhanced uptake of the virus by the lungs and probably by the blood vessels and the heart,” the authors wrote.

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