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Norwegian seafood industry eye Indian gourmet market

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norway seafood

By Saket Suman 

New Delhi, Oct 14: For well over two decades, Norwegian seafood is being served at high-end eateries in India but the imports have been significantly small due to high customs duties.

Now, there is a push to promote it in India, thanks to the efforts of the body which promotes the Nordic country’s seafood.

“Earlier, due to high customs duties the price had been above the local fish, so import volumes remained small. However, with an increasingly affluent middle class, our analysis has shown that there are potentially 20-30 million Indians who can afford to buy our products like salmon and Atlantic cod,” the Oslo-based Yogi Shergill, Director of Norwegian Seafood Council, told IANS during a visit here.

“We are aware that convincing the consumer to purchase Norwegian seafood will be a challenge and will take time. However, we now see that some local fish like pomfret is priced very close to our salmon, and higher than what Atlantic cod is sold at, so the prospects looks good,” Shergill said adding that Norwegian exporters have to be patient and have staying power to capture part of the market in India.

The Council is part of Norway’s Ministry of Trade and Fisheries, with a mandate to work with exporters to promote seafood around the world. Its mission is to maintain and develop new markets and enhance the value of the country’s seafood to benefit exporters.

“India has not been a market that the exporters have focused on. However we have seen in the last 2-3 years that salmon is now sold in modern retail stores and is available to the consumers, which is a new trend. It was therefore decided in conjunction with the exporters to explore actively the potential for Norwegian seafood,” Shergill explained.

The Council seems to be catching up fast. For example, its findings suggested that “a larger community” in Mumbai and Chennai is vegetarian. So they reduced their marketing activities accordingly and concentrated more on cities like Bengaluru and Goa.

Shergill also pointed out that the annual consumption of seafood in India was around 9.4 million tonnes, with 50 per cent coming from the sea and the rest from freshwater aquaculture.

“The wild catch from the Indian Ocean is not growing, but in a stable-to-declining state. So, if there has to be a growth in local consumption, it would be either through increased aquaculture, marine sea farms along the coast or imports. Our seafood is from the cold and pristine waters of the Northern Atlantic, so salmon and cod cannot be farmed in India, and pose no threat to the local fish,” he added.

Aiming to raise the interest in Norwegian seafood, the Council recently hosted an exclusive Seafood from Norway dinner with the country’s ambassador, Nils Ragnar Kamsvaag, in the capital. The networking dinner presented fresh salmon that is netted from Norway’s fjords.

The grand buffet of consistently delicious seafood made a fusion to tickle the India palate. Delicately flavoured salmon dishes comprised appetizers and mains dishes like achari salmon, spicy tamarind glazed salmon, chili glazed salmon, salmon coconut malai curry, Chive pancakes with smoked salmon, green olive chutney and lemon meringue. The delights may soon be on their way to a restaurant near you.

IANS

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Lifestyle

Personal hygiene tips for hair, skin

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New Delhi, June 23: Live a healthy life, keep yourself happy starting with your own body and then mind. For starters shampoo a maximum of two to three times a week. If you sweat a lot, invest in an alcohol-free and sulfate-free dry shampoo, and cover your mouth while sneezing, coughing and washing your hands frequently to avoid transmitting germs, experts suggest.

Shikhee Agrawal, Head Training, The Body Shop India, and Rohit Murgai, category expert at VLCC Healthcare Pvt limited, have listed few points which are important for personal hygiene:

* For neat hair and breathable skin, bathe regularly to get away from the toxins and maintain a personal hygiene.

Use antiperspirants that decreases sweating and perspiration. Keep a fragrant body roll-on handy. For hair, regularly go for hair spas and condition your hair for a smooth and silky hair.

* Keep you skin hydrated and cover it up using a sunscreen. Also, make sure you keep a pore minimiser handy for face. Opt for SPF for skin protection as not only in sun but also indoors.

* Wash your scalp regularly and when needed. More importantly, don’t forget to rinse your hair after swimming and exercising.

* Combing or brushing too hard can increase the frizzy look. It also damages the cuticles, leads to hair breakage, and can become a cause of hair loss in the humidity. Try to minimize the number of times you would need to comb your hair. Add bounce and volume by going through it again with a nylon-bristle brush.

* Regular exfoliation of the skin is required, so exfoliate your skin on regular basis too know the needs of your skin and hair. You can scrub your skin and hair to remove the dirt and get away using the skin and hair scrubs.

* You must moisturise your hair with a hair mask or a fruit mask to increase blood circulation. For skin always keep your lotions or light weight sorbets ready for a healthy and smooth skin.

* Opt for Regular detox maintaining a detox diet and detox water. This helps to cleanse the body and bring in a natural glow.

* Do not forget to take care o your skin. Keep a lip conditioner or lip butter in your beauty pouch with SPF to keep them hydrated and screened all day long.

* Due to increased levels of sebum secretion, coupled with a lot of humidity and moisture in the air, hair tends to get all frizzy, unmanageable and unruly. Scalp gets too itchy and general levels of a having a bad hair day peak up. Use products with genuine argan oil to moisturise hair.

* Shampooing daily will strip your scalp off its natural oils that work to keep your hair manageable. Shampoo a maximum of two to three times a week. If you sweat a lot, invest in an alcohol-free and sulfate-free dry shampoo. But do use water to rinse the scalp as often as you may need.

* Indulge in a lot of deep conditioning treatments and hair spa in the summer. Try replacing your shampoo with a mask once a week. Rinse hair with water, apply the mask for a few minutes, rinse again, and air-dry.

* Body hair should be properly cleaned otherwise, sweat gets accumulated and can cause skin infection. Get regular waxing done, as it is not cosmetic but rather a health prerogative. Waxing and laser hair removal are your best options for removing body hair.

* Due to heat and sweat, acne often tends to aggravate, resulting in a breakout. If you have acne prone skin, cleansing is very important. Make sure to use a good anti-acne face wash for best results.

* Our skin tends to be oilier during sticky summer days. To help control it, use a toner to get rid of any excess oil. Toning removes all the stuff left behind on the skin after washing, such as makeup, dead skin cells or residue left from the cleanser.

* Good personal hygiene also includes covering your mouth while sneezing and coughing, washing your hands frequently to avoid transmitting germs.

 

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Fashion

Things to keep in mind while buying leather shoes

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Leather shoes
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New Delhi, June 22: Shoes are a crucial part of a wardrobe especially the leather ones. A right pair can accentuate your look whereas a wrong choice can break your entire look no matter how great the outfit so opt for the one that suits your personality, comfort.

Ritesh Srivastava, CEO at Elitify.com and Jyoti Narula, Director at JOE SHU share a few tips to keep in mind while buying a pair of genuine leather shoes.

* Shoe surface: The tactile feel of the shoe surface plays a significant role in deciding the authenticity of leather by the buyer. A pair of genuine leather shoes will usually have a sanded and refinished surface. It would not have a plastic feel or artificial finish that is common with faux leather.

* The insole: One should examine the detailing of the inner lining of the shoes which is another important indicator of quality. Genuine leather shoes will have an extra padded insole that works as a cushion between the feet and the shoes giving comfort and ensuring a sturdy grip.

* Price factor: As a general rule genuine leather costs more. It demands a relatively higher cost for the kind of durability, aesthetic appeal and fine detailing it brings to the footwear.

* Finishing and stitching: Aesthetics play a very important role while choosing a pair of shoes. An elegant silhouette is what adds to instant appeal along with its perfect coloration. The stitching should also be neat and smooth, thereby depicting attention to detail. More so in handcrafted or hand painted shoes.

* Comfort: A fine craftsman of shoes will always focus on comfort along with the styling. There is nothing worse than a shoe that bites.

* Rich fragrance of leather: A crucial point in identifying a real leather shoe is its smell. A shoe made of genuine leather will always carry a rich fragrance which is a natural odour. Authentic leather will never smell of chemicals or plastic.

* The sole: Sole is an important indicator of quality. The better the sole and the lining the more comfort and grip it offers. The shoes should always be light in weight. An extra layer of the sole between the shoe body and the feet will give freedom to the wearer for long hours.

IANS

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Analysis

Can yoga make the cut for Olympics?

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

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Yoga

On a day when yoga is having to jostle for mind space with a hugely popular sporting event like the FIFA World Cup, many fans of the ancient regimen are seriously dreaming up for a world cup of their own. Are they getting too carried away by the euphoria around of the 4th International Day of Yoga? Or is it a case of trusting yoga’s extreme versatility to adapt itself to the demands of the time?

Will there ever be a time when a Yoga World Cup driving up a mania like the FIFA World Cup does? As yoga gets mainstreamed big time in the last four years, a debate on whether it can become a competitive sport has actually begun. The jury is still out with both sides of the divide putting out equally tenable and credible arguments.

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

Unfortunately, we have seen quite a flip-flop on this. After deciding to treat yoga as a sport in 2015, the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (MYAS) reversed the decision in the following year.

Giving in to the Puritans who frowned at any dilution of its spiritual core, it concluded yoga has quite a many subtle elements in which competitions are not possible. Many watchers see a not-so-yogic hand in this change of heart. Some of them ascribe to it a compromised arraignment to end a tug of war between MYAS and the Ministry of AYUSH over the control of yoga.

Surely, yoga isn’t just about asanas or body postures. According to the eight-limb (Ashtanga) paradigm of yoga, the other dimensions include such subtle things as adherence to social and personal ethics, control of breathing and senses and one-pointedness and meditation. It will be next to impossible to draw up a championship format for these realms of activities. Yet, sport-yoga is not a dead dream.

While it wouldn’t be possible to adapt the whole philosophy of yoga into competitive sports, we shouldn’t underestimate yoga’s flexibility to adapt itself. From being an ancient spiritual pursuit for those seeking enlightenment and becoming a hippies’ fad, yoga has shown remarkable flexibility to become the most-chanted lifestyle mantra of today.

The point is that some kind of competitive sports based on one or more limbs of yoga is a distinct possibility. Though it may not live up to the loftier promises, yoga-based games and sports will do no harm. Instead, they will do a lot of good to the cause of yoga promotion. Yoga as a sport will comfort quite a many who see a baggage of faith and welcome the greatest number of people.

Though some fear a dilution, not all yoga protagonists are against such an innovation. Big names have openly spoken about taking yoga to the Olympics. Going by the rising global craze for yoga, mats are going to roll sooner in the sporting arena. The real challenge will be in drawing up a competitive format that not only conforms to the definition of modern sports, but also doesn’t dilute the core. I don’t see any difficulties in making yoga “amusing”, “leisurely”, or “entertaining”. When martial arts and gymnastics can qualify and even make it to Olympics, asanas, the most primed candidate for being turned into competitive sports, can definitely make the cut!

Traditional yogis who swear by the spiritual and philosophical lineage of yoga need not worry. The tradition is on their side. The eight limbs of yoga are so interconnected that even if one does asanas, and that too as an exercise or a game, the practitioner is most likely to experience other dimensions like meditation, one-pointedness and bliss.

Even asanas, the most gross form of yoga, hold out endless promises. Maharishi’s Patanjali Yoga Sutra envisions asanas as a means of attaining what’s beyond the obvious. That means that adapting them into competitive sports isn’t likely to rob them of the power to unveil the Infinity.

Is it time then to tick a Perfect 10 on that gravity-defying Sirsasana?

(A former journalist, M. Rajaque Rahman is a full-time volunteer of the Art of Living. He can be reached at [email protected])

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