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Nail red carpet look with glowing skin, de-puffed eyes

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New Delhi, July 7 : Red carpet looks aren’t all about clothes and make-up. Getting the basics like glowing skin and de-puffed eyes are the key behind making the right statement, say experts.

Celebrity make-up artist Namrata Soni and dermatologist Rashmi Shetty have shared some tips:

* Make your skin glow: To ensure that your skin glows, go for an exfoliator that has both physical and chemical exfoliants. Apply a facial oil or cream and work upwards, starting at the neck, making sure you cover each section of your face while lifting the skin as you move up. Once your skin takes on a healthy pinkish colour, you can remove the oil with a damp wash cloth.

Many make the mistake of applying it after a shower which may tend to cause irritation as the skin absorbs things more quickly after being cleansed. Hence, apply a gel-based mask (which can be a peel-off or can be used as a scrub) before the shower and wash it after taking bath with a cold water so that the hot water doesn’t harm your skin. This gives your skin a lighter feel and flawless glow.

* De-puff and lift your eyes: When your skin is dry, it can allow for pesky fine lines and wrinkles to appear more pronounced. Around your delicate eye contour, these lines — known as crow’s feet — can put a damper on your skin’s appearance. A good mask and eye treatment should help to plump, rejuvenate and give your skin new life. Apply a hydrating mask in an even layer and leave it on for 15 to 20 minutes to achieve those lit up eyes when you smile.

To get rid of dark circles quickly, use a cold tea bag or a cotton soaked in a cold rose water as it instantly diminishes puffiness and relieves tiredness. Additionally, closing your eyes tightly and opening them wide 10 times will drain the fluid and efficiently help to reduce the puffiness.

* Hydrate your body: For skin that looks healthy and radiant on camera, you would want to layer with hydrating products before you apply any make-up. Start with a hydrating mist to moisten the skin and allow your products to penetrate. Quench dehydrated skin by applying a light hydrating serum, followed by your favourite moisturiser. Use a rich eye cream around the eyes and moisturise your lips with a luxurious lip balm. One final spray of toner will give your skin a lovely sheen and dewy finish, leaving you with a perfect canvas for a flawless makeup application

* Flaunt the legs with style: If you’re going to show off your legs in a classic deep slit red carpet gown, you will need to make sure they are ready to be revealed. It’s best to stay away from harmful creams and painful waxing as they can damage your skin and cause rashes if you have a sensitive skin. Switch to shaving as it is the safest method of hair removal and is also recommended by dermatologists. Use a razor that has skin conditioning ingredients like Gillette Venus Breeze, which comes with in-built body butters and glycerin that will help keep your skin moisturised before and after the shave.

* Lips that are ready for flying kisses: The skin on your lips needs to be taken care of and protected just like any other part of your body. To pull off the celebrity-style air kissing, the pout is bound to need a little extra attention. For luscious lips like your favourite celebrity, lightly exfoliate them with a dry toothbrush, scrubbing in circular motions to get rid of any dry skin. After you exfoliate, lock in moisture and condition your lips with a nourishing lip balm.

* Beauty sleep for mental rejuvenation: Getting deep sleep is one of the best things you can do for your skin before a big event. During your sleep cycle, your body repairs each of its systems, including your skin. Deep breathing and meditation is also a very important part of skin cleansing as watching your breath flow in and out helps you become aware of your skin and thus rejuvenates it.

* Also, if you have two to three days before the event, you can approach your dermatologist for a hyper-diluted botox injection, as it not only makes your skin glow but also super-tight, beautiful and shiny.

IANS

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Analysis

Can yoga make the cut for Olympics?

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

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Yoga

On a day when yoga is having to jostle for mind space with a hugely popular sporting event like the FIFA World Cup, many fans of the ancient regimen are seriously dreaming up for a world cup of their own. Are they getting too carried away by the euphoria around of the 4th International Day of Yoga? Or is it a case of trusting yoga’s extreme versatility to adapt itself to the demands of the time?

Will there ever be a time when a Yoga World Cup driving up a mania like the FIFA World Cup does? As yoga gets mainstreamed big time in the last four years, a debate on whether it can become a competitive sport has actually begun. The jury is still out with both sides of the divide putting out equally tenable and credible arguments.

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

Unfortunately, we have seen quite a flip-flop on this. After deciding to treat yoga as a sport in 2015, the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (MYAS) reversed the decision in the following year.

Giving in to the Puritans who frowned at any dilution of its spiritual core, it concluded yoga has quite a many subtle elements in which competitions are not possible. Many watchers see a not-so-yogic hand in this change of heart. Some of them ascribe to it a compromised arraignment to end a tug of war between MYAS and the Ministry of AYUSH over the control of yoga.

Surely, yoga isn’t just about asanas or body postures. According to the eight-limb (Ashtanga) paradigm of yoga, the other dimensions include such subtle things as adherence to social and personal ethics, control of breathing and senses and one-pointedness and meditation. It will be next to impossible to draw up a championship format for these realms of activities. Yet, sport-yoga is not a dead dream.

While it wouldn’t be possible to adapt the whole philosophy of yoga into competitive sports, we shouldn’t underestimate yoga’s flexibility to adapt itself. From being an ancient spiritual pursuit for those seeking enlightenment and becoming a hippies’ fad, yoga has shown remarkable flexibility to become the most-chanted lifestyle mantra of today.

The point is that some kind of competitive sports based on one or more limbs of yoga is a distinct possibility. Though it may not live up to the loftier promises, yoga-based games and sports will do no harm. Instead, they will do a lot of good to the cause of yoga promotion. Yoga as a sport will comfort quite a many who see a baggage of faith and welcome the greatest number of people.

Though some fear a dilution, not all yoga protagonists are against such an innovation. Big names have openly spoken about taking yoga to the Olympics. Going by the rising global craze for yoga, mats are going to roll sooner in the sporting arena. The real challenge will be in drawing up a competitive format that not only conforms to the definition of modern sports, but also doesn’t dilute the core. I don’t see any difficulties in making yoga “amusing”, “leisurely”, or “entertaining”. When martial arts and gymnastics can qualify and even make it to Olympics, asanas, the most primed candidate for being turned into competitive sports, can definitely make the cut!

Traditional yogis who swear by the spiritual and philosophical lineage of yoga need not worry. The tradition is on their side. The eight limbs of yoga are so interconnected that even if one does asanas, and that too as an exercise or a game, the practitioner is most likely to experience other dimensions like meditation, one-pointedness and bliss.

Even asanas, the most gross form of yoga, hold out endless promises. Maharishi’s Patanjali Yoga Sutra envisions asanas as a means of attaining what’s beyond the obvious. That means that adapting them into competitive sports isn’t likely to rob them of the power to unveil the Infinity.

Is it time then to tick a Perfect 10 on that gravity-defying Sirsasana?

(A former journalist, M. Rajaque Rahman is a full-time volunteer of the Art of Living. He can be reached at [email protected])

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Yoga Day 2018: Present-age guides to yog and its health benefits

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New Delhi, June 21: Is yoga just about being twisted into different positions like a pretzel or sitting cross-legged on a mat with closed eyes?

One might think of it as a class where you learn to twist your body but multiple gurus from Paramahansa Yogananda to Baba Ramdev, the yoga tycoon of the contemporary age, who have had a contribution in publicising Yoga in India and the world have popularised it as an ancient philosophy, much more than a mere physical activity and something which needs to be understood in order to fully benefit from it.

In December 2014, United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted an India-led resolution recognising that “yoga provides a holistic approach to health and well-being” and declared June 21 as International Day of Yoga.

Since the time when Yoga gained prominence, the market has been inundated with books on
Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga and Bikram Yoga which are certainly among the most popular types.

A recently launched read written by Madan Kataria endorses something called Laughter Yoga, which is slowly making its way to the ashrams, gyms and fitness centres.

Kataria in his book, “Laughter Yoga”, published by Penguin, speaks of various ways of practicing Yoga with an abundance of laughter. The book costs Rs 250 and has 230
pages.

“…I credit laughter yoga with giving me the ability to walk through this dark valley to the light and happiness on the other side,” he writes.

He says that laughter triggers the release of a cocktail of chemicals and hormones that are extremely beneficial and crucial to good health.

Theories and researches confirm that humour plays for people in situations such as dealing with misfortune, making sense of rule violations, and bonding with others, we propose that underlying each of these theories are the physiological benefits of laughter.

“We draw on findings from empirical studies on laughter to demonstrate that these physiological benefits occur regardless of the theory that is used to explain the humour function.

Findings from these studies have important implications for nurse practitioners working in hospice settings, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, and hospitals,” says research done at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at Bethesda, Maryland.

Another new book in the market, “Yoga Shakti” by Shailaja Menon, is a like a catalogue of various yoga exercises presented on glossy pages alongside pictures demonstrating them. Published by Niyogi, the book costs Rs 495 and consists of 179 pages.

Menon, in the book, critiques the notion that yoga is a class where you learn to twist your body into different asanas.

Using personal experiences, she explains the origins of the philosophy and recommends daily exercises to help introduce beginners to it.

When we experience major trauma, the instinctive reaction is to shrink, Menon in her book writes, to the contrary the invitation of life and yoga is to keep expanding to keep evolving.

IANS

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On World Music Day, singing legend Lata Mangeshkar’s tips to singers

I never could bear to hear myself. Whenever a song of mine would play on the radio or television, I’d quickly leave the room. If I ever hear myself singing, I find a dozen faults.

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Lata Mangeshkar

Mumbai, June 20 (IANS) Singing Legend Lata Mangeshkar doesn’t listen to much of today’s music. Not that she listens to her own songs either.

“I never could bear to hear myself. Whenever a song of mine would play on the radio or television, I’d quickly leave the room. If I ever hear myself singing, I find a dozen faults,” says the eternal songstress with a laugh.

Strange, coming from a singer who is known to be ceaselessly faultless. In fact once the great Hindustani classical vocalist Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan had affectionately cribbed: “Kambhakt, kabhi besura nahin gaati(the devil, she never goes off-key).”

Lataji laughs at this. “Woh unka badappan tha (that was his greatness). But any artiste, singer or otherwise, must keep striving for excellence, no matter how much they achieve. Nowadays I don’t see that ‘lagan’ (discipline), that ‘junoon’ (passion) in singers.

“I get the feeling they are happy achieving what they get to achieve in no time at all. No artiste should be satisfied with what he or she has achieved. There is always another sky to conquer beyond the one that you think you’ve just reached.”

The one thing that Lataji sees lacking in singers today is practice. “Riyaaz. That is what makes singing worthwhile. I never felt I had enough time to do riyaaz because I was in and out of recordings constantly. But I still made time to do riyaaz. Alas, not enough time. I wish I had devoted more time to practicing my classical singing. Singers today are losing touch completely with their classical heritage. An A.R. Rahman or a Shankar Mahadevan are so successful and long-lasting because they know their classical heritage.”

Lataji also warns against imitative music. “Re-mixes and cover versions of old classics are very lazy routes to instant success. Remember, a song that has attained a classic’s status is regarded so highly because it is of a quality that cannot be replicated. I’ve heard some of the re-mixes of the songs sung by Rafi Saab, Kishoreda (Kumar), Mukesh Bhaiyya, me and my sister Asha. And I cringe.Please, create original music. Imitation is not creation. It isn’t even art.”

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