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Most millennials unhappy with Donald Trump: Survey

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US President Donald Trump (File Photo)

New York, Jan 17: Over 60 per cent of millennials in the US are unhappy with President Donald Trump, and only 37 per cent view him favourably, a new survey has revealed.

Conducted by the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, the survey looked at opinions of 1,000 Americans aged 18 to 37.

Trump’s performance was rated on key issues like gun control, immigration policies and possible 2020 presidential candidates.

Nearly 70 per cent do not approve of Trump’s behaviour on Twitter saying that he tweets too much.

“Republican millennials like Trump and like the job he’s doing as president, but two-fifth of them want the president to tweet less,” said John Cluverius, Assistant Professor at the varsity..

“It goes to show that even among his staunchest supporters, there’s concern about the President’s personal approach to the office,” Cluverius said.

On the issue of gun control, 60 per cent expressed support for increasing restrictions on the purchase and carrying of firearms, while 21 per cent said the current restrictions were enough as 18 per cent even favoured fewer restrictions.

On immigration, millennials demonstrate far less liberal attitudes than on the other issues.

The poll also asked millennials about potential 2020 presidential candidates. On that, 54 per cent said they will support whoever the Democratic nominee be, compared to 27 per cent who said they would vote for Trump.

Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders were the most liked politicians by the millennials.

“Young Americans continue to be sceptical, pessimistic and disillusioned by the state of the country and its future course, and more than any previous generation of young Americans, they identify very strongly with the Democratic party,” Cluverius noted.

The poll has also revealed that although millennials make up almost half of the total users on Twitter and Facebook, only 37 per cent view these social media platforms favourably, while 50 per cent view it unfavourably.

“Younger millennials may be switching to platforms like Instagram and Snapchat, but I think this finding reinforces the idea that while lots of people use these services, they don’t make people happy,” Cluverius said.

IANS

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Indian-American Amrit Singh becomes first turban-wearing Deputy Constable in Harris County in US state of Texas

In 2015, Harris County made national headlines after sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal fought for and won the rights to wear his turban and beard on duty.

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Houston, Jan 22 : Amrit Singh, an Indian-American law enforcement officer, has scripted history by becoming the first-ever turban-wearing Sikh to be sworn in as Deputy Constable in Harris County in the US state of Texas.

Singh, 21, will be the first in his profession to wear his articles of faith – a turban, beard, and uncut hair in the line of duty.

It was a historic day on Tuesday as Singh’s swearing-in coincided with the adoption of a new policy that allows law enforcement officers in nearly every single Harris County Constable’s Office to wear articles of their faith while in uniform. For Sikhs, that means being able to wear a turban and beard while on duty.

Singh always wanted to work as a peace officer. He spent years in law enforcement explorer programmes and five months in a police training academy.

“Growing up, I always wanted to be a deputy and my Sikh faith was also very important to me,” Singh said.

“Constable Alan Rosen was the first one to give me a callback. He opened this agency with open arms for me,” he said.

Speaking at Singh’s swearing-in ceremony, Precinct 1 Constable Rosen said the county’s eight constables supported accommodations for Sikhs to serve while adhering to their religion.

“As a man of the Jewish faith, I know how it feels to be religiously targeted and how important it is to teach inclusion, understanding and tolerance,” Rosen said, standing in front of representatives from the county’s other constable offices.

“To me, wearing a yarmulke or him wearing a turban really doesn’t impact the quality of work he’s going to do. It should have zero impact on public safety or what job we do. Are you going to care if the person showing up to your door to help save you has a turban or yarmulke? You’re not. You’re just happy they’re there to save you and keep you safe,” the officer said.

Singh will now go on to months of field training, after which he will be assigned to patrol within Precinct One.

In 2015, Harris County made national headlines after sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal fought for and won the rights to wear his turban and beard on duty.

At the time of the deputy’s murder last year, just a few dozen law enforcement agencies across the United States — and the US Army — had uniform policies with religious accommodations allowing Sikhs to serve in accordance with their faith.

“Legacy of Dhaliwal is not far removed, it clearly recognised and acknowledge his service and this is a gift that continues to give in his recognition and legacy,” said Bobby Singh, a Sikh community leader.

In 2009, Dhaliwal was the first Sikh to join the Harris County Sheriff’s Office and in 2015, he became the first Sikh law enforcement officer to be allowed to wear his articles of faith in uniform. He was shot and killed during a traffic stop last year.

“We honour his legacy by honouring his faith here today,” Rosen said.

In the months since Dhaliwal’s death, law enforcement agencies in California, Washington and in Texas have signalled willingness to change their policies, said Manpreet Singh of the Sikh Coalition, which advocates for religious accommodations for minority communities in public and private sectors.

“It makes me proud to be a Houstonian, and a Texan. I hope the rest of the nation follows Texas,” she said.

“I could just hope that I could be half as decent a cop as he ever was, and everything I do, I want people to know that I’m doing it following in his footsteps,” Deputy Singh said.

“He made our community proud,” said Suhel Singh, Deputy Singh’s father.

Singh’s parents were recognised at the ceremony. They told FOX 26 that they were proud to see their son pursue his passion even though it is a dangerous job.

“The way I look at it, maybe it will make me pray harder and be more praying for his protection from God,” said Singh’s mother Sukie Kaur.

Singh is now one of just two law enforcement officers in the county wearing a turban.

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Republican ‘disturbed’ over party’s stance in Trump impeachment

Murkowski also said there should be distance between the White House and the Senate over how the trial is conducted.

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Washington, Dec 26 : Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski has said that she was “disturbed” by her party’s stance before President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, it was reported on Thursday.

The Alaska Senator’s comments come after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellpledged “total co-ordination” with the White House, the BBC said in a report.

Murkowski told Alaska’s KTUU news channel on Wednesday that she was uncomfortable with McConnell’s comments about “total co-ordination”.

“When I heard that I was disturbed,” she said.

Murkowski also said there should be distance between the White House and the Senate over how the trial is conducted.

“To me it means that we have to take that step back from being hand in glove with the defence,” the BBC quoted her as saying to KTUU channel.

She further said that the impeachment proceedings were “rushed”.

Murkowski, a moderate Republican, has criticised President Trump on a number of policy issues.

In October 2018, she opted not to vote to confirm Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, after sexual assault allegations.

On December 18, Trump was impeached by the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

He now faces a trial in the Republican-dominated Senate, whose members are supposed to remain impartial.

The trial could begin next month, after the holiday break.

However, Trump, the third President in US history to be impeached, was unlikely to be removed from office because of the Republican control of the Senate.

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Speaker Pelosi orders Trump’s impeachment to proceed

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New York, Dec 5 : House of Representatives’ Democrat Speaker Nancy Pelosi ordered the impeachment to proceed on Thursday with the framing of charges of jeopardising national security against President Donald Trump for a trial in the Senate.

The historic announcement came after about two months of investigation by House of Representatives, making it only the third time in the 243-year history of the US that a President would be impeached.

“The President leaves us no choice but to act, because he is trying to corrupt, once again, the election for his own benefit,” she said asking the House of Representatives committee leaders to proceed with the drafting of the Articles of Impeachment, which is a charge sheet for the Senate to try Trump.

“The President has engaged in abuse of power undermining our national security and jeopardising the integrity of our elections,” Pelosi said in a Washington press conference.

She ended her announcement with an appeal to religion, saying, “So help me God,” after saying the Democrats were “prayerful”.

Before her announcement, Trump threw a challenge at her in a tweet: “if you are going to impeach me, do it now, fast, so we can have a fair trial in the Senate, and so that our Country can get back to business.”

Trump is relying on the Senate, where his party has a majority to throw out the charges and acquit him.

The Republicans will be able to call the witnesses blocked by the Democrats in the House panels’ hearings to testify.

Trump tweeted that they would call former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter, House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, and Pelosi.

He added that this “will reveal, for the first time, how corrupt our system really is. I was elected to ‘Clean the Swamp,’ and that’s what I am doing”.

Pelosi’s announcement sets the Democrat-controlled House firmly on the path to early impeachment, with a vote likely before it adjourns for the Christmas vacation.

A Senate trial would then follow in January in an election year.

Only two Presidents, Andrew Johnson in the 19th century and Bill Clinton in the last have been impeached and both were acquitted by the Senate.

Pelosi had to make a firm statement because some members of her party in swing constituencies, which were Republican but moved to Democrats in last year’s elections, were apprehensive that the impeachment may work against them next year.

The nation’s polarisation is reflected in the impeachment issue with an almost even split in public opinion. According to the latest RealClear Politics aggregation of polls, there is 48.3 per cent support for impeachment and 44.6 per cent against, with a narrow spread of 3.7 per cent.

Mindful of this, Pelosi said: “Sadly, but with confidence and humility, with allegiance to our founders and a heart full of love for America, today I am asking our chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment.”

She likened Trump’s conduct to the late 18th century British monarch George III against whom Americans rose in revolt because he was considered above the law.

The founders of the US established the impeachment process to ensure that the President was not above the law like a king, she said.

The House Judicial Committee held a public hearing on Wednesday where four law professors testified on the constitutional and legal aspects of impeachment.

The three summoned by the Democrats made the case for Trump’s impeachment while the one called by the Republicans opposed it.

The Judicial Committee picked up the impeachment process from the Intelligence Committee, which delivered a 300-page report on Tuesday outlining the charges against Trump.

The Intelligence Committee accused him of placing “his own personal and political interests above the national interests of the United States.”

It said his “scheme subverted US foreign policy toward Ukraine and undermined our national security in favour of two politically motivated investigations that would help his presidential re-election campaign”.

At the heart of the charges is Trump asking Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky “as a favour” to inquire into the dealings of former Vice President Biden and his son in Ukraine, and into alleged interference by that country in the 2016 elections.

Joe Biden also sought the removal of the prosecutor looking into the gas company, Burisma.

The Trump administration delayed military aid to Ukraine, which the Democrats say was done to force the country to launch the probes, but Republicans contend was done to ensure that there was no corruption.

Democrats say the request to investigate the Bidens was seeking foreign interference in US elections because the former Vice President is the front-runner for Democratic Party nomination to run against Trump.

The delay in aid, Democrats say, threatened US national security as it was beneficial to Russia.

Zelensky has denied that he felt he was under pressure from Trump to carry out the inquiries.

Republicans point out that the aid was released without Zelensky ordering the probes.

Hunter Biden who was removed from the Navy for alleged drug use and had no experience in the energy business was appointed to the board of a gas company with a monthly payment of $83,000 while the then Vice President was overseeing US relations with Ukraine.

(Arul Louis can be contacted at [email protected] and followed on Twitter @arulouis)

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