Connect with us

Tech

Morocco’s Noor: Capturing the sun to bring light

Published

on

Morocco Noor

Casablanca, April 17 : Four years ago, Morocco imported 93 percent of its energy needs. By 2030, it hopes to get 52 per cent from renewables. Just how serious the country is about solar power comes across loud and clear to visitors as soon as one crosses the Mohamed V International Airport here.

Large solar panels along the road and street lights topped with solar panels line the way for a few miles — highlighting how the north African nation is moving firmly ahead in its mission to become a solar superpower.

Morocco’s King Mohammed VI earlier this month launched the fourth and final phase of the world’s largest solar energy plant — Noor Solar in Ouarzazate, on the edge of the Sahara desert. Noor is the Arabic word for light.

The first phase of the $9 billion project was launched in 2013, while the second and third phases were launched in 2016.

When completed in 2018, the desert solar power complex will have a 582 MW capacity, enough to power 1.1 million homes — and would measure the size of capital Rabat.

Morocco’s leadership in renewable energy was highlighted at last month’s Crans Montana Forum where Said Moufti, Research Director of the Royal Institute for Strategic Studies, pointed out that solar and wind power plants had been set up all over the southern provinces. “Morocco is showing by way of example,” he said.

The first phase of Noor, which was commissioned in February 2016, uses 500,000 curved mirrors spread over thousands of acres of desert to generate up to 160 MW, making it one of the world’s biggest solar thermal power plants.

The mirrors are part of technology called concentrated solar power (CSP). The 39-foot-tall parabolic mirrors focus the sun’s energy to heat fluid in pipelines, which when mixed with water, produces steam to drive a turbine.

This system can store power after the sun goes down and generate power at night.

While Phases II and III are also CSP projects, Noor IV, the final phase, uses photovoltaic (PV) technology to produce electricity.

The entire Noor project, when ready, will help reduce CO2 emissions by 760,000 tonnes a year and by 17.5 million tonnes over 25 years, according to reports.

Morocco’s stress on renewable energy will not only help the country reduce its energy imports, but also generate revenue from exporting energy across the Mediterranean to Europe and to its neighbours in Africa.

Morocco, a country of 33 million people, is the only African country with a power cable link to Europe.

The stress on renewable energy will also create jobs.

Morocco currently employs about 3,000 people in the renewable energy sector. According to a study by the Euro-Mediterranean Forum of Institutes of Economic Sciences (FEMISE), the country is expected to create between 270,000 and 500,000 new green jobs by 2040.

The report was released at the COP22 held in Marrakech last year.

The Noor project is being developed on a build, own, operate and transfer (BOOT) basis by ACWA Power Ouarzazate, a consortium of Saudi Arabia’s ACWA Power, the Moroccan Agency for Solar Energy (MASEN), Aries and TSK.

Morocco is also focusing on wind energy. It has set up the Tarfaya wind farm complex — said to be the largest in Africa — stretching more than 100 sq km across the Sahara desert, on the southern Atlantic coast.

(The writer was in Morocco at the invitation of the Crans Montana Forum. Ranjana Narayan can be reached at [email protected])

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Auto

2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260 launched in India at Rs 15.99 Lakh

Published

on

2018 Ducati Multistrada 1260

New Delhi, June 18: Ducati India has just launched the 2018 Multistrada 1260 in the country at Rs 15.99 lakh (ex-showroom), while the Multistrada 1260 S has been priced at Rs 18.06 lakh (ex-showroom). Ducati India announced the launch through its social media on Tuesday.

The 1260 is the company’s flagship adventure-tourer and comes with a number of changes over the model it replaces. These updates include additional power, a revised chassis and new equipment.

The Multistrada gets a new 1,262cc, liquid-cooled, L-Twin motor. It produces 158hp at 9,500rpm, a 6hp increment over the 2017 Multistrada. Torque, too, has gone up by 1.5Nm, bringing the total up to 129.5Nm, which is delivered at 7,500rpm. The new engine features what Ducati calls Desmodromic Variable Timing (DVT), which, combined with Desmo valve actuation, results in good low-end torque. This tech also helps make the engine Euro-IV emission norms compliant.

The DVT on the Ducati Multistrada 1260 combines variable timing with desmo valve actuation which delivers an ideal combination of horsepower, low-rpm torque as well as meets Euro-4 emission norms. The Multistrada 1260 DVT engine is now capable of 160 PS at 9,500 rpm and 129.4 Nm at 7,500 rpm. However, it now gets a very flat torque curve, delivering 85 percent of peak torque from as low as 3,500 rpm, something ADV riders will greatly appreciate.

Internationally, the Multistrada 1260 is available in four variants, the 1260, 1260 S, the S D|air and the Pikes Peak – the last two will only come to India later, if at all.

To make the most of the new engine, the chassis has been retuned as well. The steering rake has been increased from 24 to 25 degrees, adding 5 mm of trail, and the swingarm is 48 mm longer.

This takes the wheelbase to 1,585 mm from 1,530 mm on the earlier model. The longer wheelbase should be able to facilitate more comfortable riding and better stability. The Multistrada 1260 has 48 mm inverted forks up front and a rear shock by Sachs, both fully adjustable.

The 1260 S also receives a new high-definition colour TFT display, navigation, semi-active Ducati Skyhook Suspension (DSS), as well as barrage of rider assist options including a vehicle hold control, as well as four riding modes – sport, touring, urban, and enduro.

WeForNews

Continue Reading

Tech

Google kills feature to book Uber rides through Maps

Published

on

Uber ride google map

San Francisco, June 19: Google has reportedly killed the ability of direct Uber ride booking from inside Google Maps without giving any reason.

The feature allowing users to book Uber rides through Google Maps was added in January last year, with which users could enter a location, identify their route, check Uber prices and request a ride without leaving the Maps app.

On one Google Maps Help page, Google simply says “you can no longer book Uber rides directly in Google Maps”, Android Police reported late on Monday.

Uber integration was pulled from Google Maps on iOS earlier then on Android, according to the report.

The ability to book an Uber through Maps allowed users to avoid the official Uber app, which has previously been criticised for its aggressive location tracking.

IANS

Continue Reading

Tech

Australian court fines Apple for misleading customers

Published

on

Apple

Canberra, June 19: An Australian court on Tuesday asked Apple to pay a fine worth $6.6 million for misleading customers who bought its devices between February 2015 and February 2016.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) filed a lawsuit in the Australian Federal Court against Apple and its subsidiary in the country after investigating hundreds of customer complaints regarding to the “error 53”, reports Efe news.

This technical failure disabled some iPhones and iPads after users downloaded an update to Apple’s iOS operating system.

Apple admitted that it refused to repair the devices of at least 275 affected customers in Australia, claiming the devices had already been repaired by a third party.

“If a product is faulty, customers are legally entitled to a repair or a replacement under the Australian Consumer Law, and sometimes even a refund,” ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court said.

After the ACCC notified the US-based company of its investigation into the case, Apple implemented a programme to compensate the affected customers, which are estimated to be about 5,000, added the government regulator.

IANS

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Most Popular