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Mix and Match of wedding wear

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wedding wear

New Delhi, May 15: Wedding happens once in a life, everyone tries to make it grand celebration with bright colours, textured fabrics and beautiful prints dominating the bridal wear.

Emerging trend of the market in the wedding wear market is mixing and matching Indian and western fashion sensibilities to create a fusion feel, say experts.

Kabir Mehra and Samarth Hegde from Herringbone & Sui, a made to measure custom menswear brand, and designer Priyanka Modi from label AM:PM have suggested how.

Mehra and Hegde share tips on menswear:

* When it comes to D-day, men can go for bold prints, floral motifs and brightly coloured fabrics with sober embroidery and for the daytime function try to wear light coloured dress.

* A bandhgala made of pure velvet with black braided trousers is a good option. For a fusion, change the buttons and the lining of your jackets to enhance your personality.

* For another Indo-western option, try Mao jackets made of 100 per cent linen which is good for summers The idea is to add your own sense of style and personality into everything you wear.

Priyanka Modi doles out tips on women’s wear:

* Pair a heavy lehenga with a simple monochrome shirt, or a short jacket. These days bridal silhouettes are in trend.

* Luxurious fabrics like velvet, silk and organza are in demand with pearls and interesting sequins.

Wefornews Bureau

Disaster

Study reveals new strategies to control Covid-19 pandemic

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Social Distancing in Mizoram

London, July 13 : Strategies for the safe reopening of low and middle-income countries (LMICs) in response to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic must recognise that preserving people’s health is as important as reviving the economy, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.

In the study, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, the research team examined three community-based exit strategies, and recommended their scopes, limitations and the appropriate application in the LMICs.

The three approaches considered are sustained mitigation, zonal lockdowns and rolling lockdowns. “Successfully re-opening a country requires consideration of both the economic and social costs,” said study lead author Rajiv Chowdhury from the University of Cambridge in the UK.

“Governments should approach these options with a mind-set that health and economy both are equally important to protect – reviving the economy should not take priority over preserving people”s health,” he added.

The study also revealed that strategies need to be based on the local epidemic growth rate at the time, social and economic costs, existing health systems capabilities and detailed plans to implement.

Sustained ”mitigation-only” approaches such as those adopted in the UK, Switzerland and other European countries, involve basic prevention measures such as mask-wearing, physical distancing and the isolation of positive cases after testing.

Zonal lockdowns approach involves identifying and ”cordoning off” new outbreak clusters with a high number of cases, keeping contact between zones and containing the disease within a small geographic area.

However, the authors point out that any successful implementation of zonal lockdown requires regular data feedback operations in real-time to identify hotspots, including information on newly confirmed cases, updated region-specific reproduction and growth rates, and deaths by age.

Additionally, control of transmission within zones may be an enormous undertaking. For example, in India, where this approach has been employed, the infection size within a cordoned zone can be as high as 100-200 times outside the zone.

Intermittent rolling lockdowns are now advocated by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in various LMICs. These involve implementing strict social distancing for a set number of days before a period of relaxation. Rolling lockdowns may be particularly useful in LMICs with dense populations, where this is a high potential for contact, weak health systems and poor contact tracing.

“These three strategies should not be considered as one or the other. A country should further adapt and could combine them as needed,” the authors wrote.

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Beauty salons, nail bars and tattoo shops reopen for first time in four months

Meanwhile, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said that there were more than 100 “local actions” taken across the country each week to stem fresh outbreaks.

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Beauty salons Tatoo

London, July 13 : Beauty salons, nail bars and tattoo shops in England reopened on Monday after a four-month closure due to the COVID-19 lockdown.

Spas, massage studios and physical therapy businesses will also be able to welcome customers again from Monday, reports the Metro newspaper.

But businesses will be required to meet coronavirus guidelines, and restrictions on treatments which involve work directly in front of the face will not be available.

Government guidance states that face waxing, eyelash treatments, make-up application and facials should not be provided because of the greater risk of COVID-19 transmission.

The relaxation comes as around 200 workers at a farm in Herefordshire were quarantined following a fresh COVID-19 outbreas.

Some 73 positive cases of the virus have been confirmed among workers at vegetable producer AS Green and Co, which is based in the village of Mathon, near Worcester.

A joint statement from Public Health England (PHE) Midlands and Herefordshire Council said employees were being asked to remain on the farm during the period of isolation, the Metro newspaper reported.

Meanwhile, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said that there were more than 100 “local actions” taken across the country each week to stem fresh outbreaks.

As of Monday, the UK reported a total of 291,154 coronavirus cases, with 44,904 deaths.

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Pope ”pained” by Hagia Sophia mosque decision

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the first Muslim prayers would be held in Hagia Sophia on July 24.

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Hagia Sophia Mosque

Vatican City, July 13 : Pope Francis has said he”s “pained” by Turkey”s decision to convert Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia back into a mosque.

Speaking at a service in the Vatican, the Roman Catholic leader added that his “thoughts go to Istanbul”, the BBC reported.

Hagia Sophia was built as a Christian cathedral nearly 1,500 years ago and turned into a mosque after the Ottoman conquest of 1453.

The Unesco World Heritage Site became a museum in 1934 under Turkish Republic founding father Ataturk.

But earlier this week a Turkish court annulled the site”s museum status, saying its use as anything other than a mosque was “not possible legally”.

Pope Francis confined himself to a few words on the issue: “My thoughts go to Istanbul. I think of Santa Sophia and I am very pained.”

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the first Muslim prayers would be held in Hagia Sophia on July 24.

Shortly after the announcement, the first call to prayer was recited at the site and broadcast on all of Turkey”s main news channels. Hagia Sophia”s social media channels have also been taken down.

Islamists in Turkey have long called for it to become a mosque again but secular opposition members opposed the move.

Defending the decision, President Erdogan stressed that the country had exercised its sovereign right, and he added that the building would remain open to all Muslims, non-Muslims and foreign visitors.

The Pope is one of several religious and political leaders worldwide who have criticised the move.

The World Council of Churches has called on President Erdogan to reverse the decision. The Church in Russia, home to the world”s largest Orthodox Christian community, immediately expressed regret that the Turkish court had not taken its concerns into account when ruling on Hagia Sophia.

It has also drawn condemnation from Greece, and Unesco said its World Heritage Committee would now review the monument”s status.

One of Turkey”s most famous authors, Orhan Pamuk, told the BBC that the decision would take away the “pride” some Turks had in being a secular Muslim nation.

“There are millions of secular Turks like me who are crying against this but their voices are not heard,” said Pamuk.

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