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Millennials choose Trekking over Partying

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In a general trend observed since a past few years, it has been seen that the millennials are showing a shift in their behavior when it comes to fitness. Even a few years back youngsters were seen enjoying partying every weekend. Those parties typically meant booze, late nights, junk food, and over-eating. These became a factor not only behind the youngsters gaining some extra pounds, but also deteriorating their fitness with time. It took them some time to understand the grave mistake that they were doing.
In a growing trend the millennials have shown a shift of interest from partying to fitness. When it comes to fitness, they also chose alternate sports apart from hitting the gym regularly. Running marathons, going for trail runs, cycling, trekking, hiking, are some of the alternate sports activities that have caught the attention of the millennials. Millennials believe that taking part in these sports help them break the monotony of their daily life of college and office. Lalit R. Parakh, an employee of PwC, Kolkata says, “My sister introduced me to alternate sports. I also hit the gym, but it never gives me thesatisfaction that I get from marathons and trail runs. Running drives out all the negativity and brings out positivity and confidence in me.” Lalit also plans to start participating in cycle races this year.
With growing number of people like Lalit, many sports management companies are organizing such alternate sports in and around cities, in the entire country. Some of these events have garnered huge popularity and have been getting participants from people outside India too.These sports can be taken up by anyone. There are groups that provide training for certain sports. While sports like trekking, camping, and hiking might not need any formal training in the beginning, some activities like rock climbing, roller-skating need to be mastered.
It is a fresh change to even think that youngsters are preferring to go for alternate sports in their spare time, rather than roaming in malls without any specific reason. AnupamSaha, who had moved to Mumbai from Kolkata, said, “When I moved to Mumbai, my neighbour who is 6 years younger to me told me about his interest in trekking and camping. I had few acquaintances in Mumbai so I joined him. Since then I have already been to several treks and hikes with them. It is amazing to watch how these kids are keeping fit by taking part in these alternate sports.”
Akash Korgaonkar, the founder-director of Ruggedian, says, “Youngsters are fitness conscious, these days. Their interest and enthusiasm to choose trekking, mountain-cycling, trail running is a good way to keep fit.Their desire for adventure along with their fitness regime are creating more scope for alternate sports in India.”
It is evident that a new culture is gradually seeping through in the world of the millennials. The regular gym hitters also are opting for these sports to unwind from the stress level and break the mundanity of everyday life. They have chosen to trek, camp, and cycle to create memories besides fitness than to just walk on the treadmill aimlessly or partying every weekend.
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Modi’s BJP suffers defeat in Hindi heartland states

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Rahul Modi

Dec 11 :With good performance in assembly elections in three Hindi heartland states (Chattisgarh, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh), Rahul Gandhi, who took over the Congress reins as party President on December 16 last year, has proved the opponent BJP’s Modi that he has the power to defeat the political force of BJP- RSS that seek to divide the nation on communal lines.

But BJP suffered its worst defeat in these elections and Narendra Modi with 56-inch chest, who changed the very nature of politics and campaigning style after coming into power four years ago by making tall economic promises and showcasing Hindu nationalist views, failed to impress voters this time. He promised to give Rs 15 Lakh to very Indian ,including creating one million jobs a month.

The Assembly results of five states is an indication that Modi’s brand is losing its luster.

Modi used every medium of technology from social networking sites, campaigning and even right wing organisations to scrutinize each and every speech and action of Congress president Rahul Gandhi and trying to build a fake propaganda of rejection but the fifth generation of Gandhi family leading the grand old party has successfully snatched two states – Chhattisgarh and Rajasthan – from the Modi-led BJP,while Congress is locked in a close fight in Madhya Pradesh in the semi-final test before the 2019 national election.

Rahul Gandhi hit the right chord by targeting Modi government on social and governance issues of farmers plight, youth unemployment,insecurity among minorities,corruption in Rafale deal, destruction and misuse of constitutional institutions like RBI, investigative agencies and educational institutions.This is quite evident from the latest development by the sudden resignation of the RBI Governor Urjit Patel.

This election has reflected the mood of the nation thus rejecting the element of fundamentalism, policy of divide and rule, giving importance to cow slaughter more than human lives and thus encouraging lynching by giving a free hand to his cabinet ministers to honour the culprits.

Rahul Gandhi addressed a press conference said that Prime Minister Narendra Modi had “failed to listen to the heartbeat of the nation.” Gandhi also said that “I was telling my mother that the absolute best thing for me was the 2014 election. I learnt a lot from that election. I learnt that the most important thing is humility,” said the 48-year-old Congress chief, who took a lot of the blame for the party’s non-stop election disasters. “Frankly Narendra Modi taught me the lesson- what not to do,” he added.

Congress makes an impressive comeback in the Chhattisgarh Assembly Election Result 2018 and is all set to end the 15-years rule of Raman Singh. Congress emerged as the winner in Rajasthan, Sachin Pilot and Ashok Gehlot are leading the talks for government formation in the state.

Madhya Pradesh Congress president Kamal Nath and party’s campaign committee chief Jyotiraditya Scindia are personally leading the effort to gather support from BSP and SP. In fact, Kamal Nath was believed to be in touch with BSP supremo Mayawati and SP chief Akhilesh Yadav.

Although he has been successful in extraditing Michel but Modi government failed to prevent economic offenders escaping from India with the taxpayers’money under their watch.

Rahul, who aggressively campaigned in the states by implementing his strategy of asking his party workers to engage in door to door campaigning and highlighting the failures of the current government and he himself addressed 82 rallies in poll bound states and religiously targeted Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the BJP on the Rafale deal, the Nirav Modi scam and other such topics that many said had no mass connect. He tore into PM Modi and controversially said, in rally after rally, “Chowkidar chor hain”.His speeches apparently found resonance with
the voters but he also focused on optics.

BJP used every opportunity to mock the Congress president since the party was reduced to 44 seats in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections.

Now the time for the BJP is to introspect but the Saffron party hurriedly blamed the state chief ministers for the party’s defeat and said that “Modi is still popular among the masses and the election results do not reflect Central government policies led by Modi.”

Modi’s popularity is declining steadily and it all started with demonetisation which led to the closure of small and medium businesses and the collapse of small traders industry; faulty implementation of GST that jolted people’s confidence in him, steady steep hike in fuel prices,rampant corruption and high inflation.

Modi’s allies are concerned after seeing the results in cow belt, where the BJP’s domination has ended .Modi failed to deliver on the commitments he made during 2014 campaigning which backfired in these election results.

Blog : By Arti Bali,
arti

(Senior Journalist)

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Universities should consult industry on designing courses to make students employable

Such initiatives hold the key to driving India’s innovative capacity forward and making the country more competitive.

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Enhancing employability

Even though the idea of globalisation has come under fire in the last few years, with increasing levels of discontentment over inequity in the distribution of gains, the benefits that the world economies have derived from it are often overlooked.

One unmistakable benefit has been the transfer of productivity-enhancing technology between nations and diffusion of innovation worldwide. The International Monetary Fund’s World Economic Outlook released in April this year also pointed out that globalisation has given a significant boost to the diffusion of knowledge and technology across the world through free trade, higher foreign direct investment and the international use of patents and copyrights.

Innovation has become the key to gaining greater market share and more and more countries are shifting their policy focus on building their innovative capacities to strengthen the competitiveness of their economies. Competitiveness is defined as “the ability of firms to compete, grow and be profitable in the long run”. Studies find an unequivocal link between innovative capacity and competitiveness of nations and regions. In fact, it is almost next to impossible for businesses to become competitive without innovating in its products and operations.

With the world innovating at breakneck speed, no country wants to be left in the lurch. Most significantly, China has laid out a plan to become an “innovative nation” by 2020 and an “international innovation leader” by 2030 in its current Five-Year Plan. Even countries like Saudi Arabia that have historically been heavily resource-dependent are making a conscious move towards higher innovation. These countries are beginning to recognise the fact that building a competitive advantage based on factor endowments (cheap labour in case of China and oil reserves for Saudi Arabia) cannot be sustained over the long run. A transition to a knowledge-based economy is imperative.

India can ill-afford to find itself lagging on the curve. The country had missed out on the first industrial revolution on account of being at the receiving end of colonial history. No other phase of innovation in history has transformed industry to such an extent. Only the digital revolution at the end of the 20th century came close. It is, therefore, a rare and opportune time for India to accelerate its development process and move into the next stage of growth by focusing on strategies to foster innovative capacity.

In recognition of the urgency to act, a roundtable on “Innovation for Prosperity” was organized by NITI Aayog and the Institute for Competitiveness last week to draw actionable policy recommendations for NITI Aayog to work upon to improve India’s innovation capacity. One of the most pertinent issues raised at the roundtable was the issue of industry-academia linkage in the Indian education system.

Around the world, universities are seen as hubs of innovation where experts from varied fields come together to share their ideas for developing new technologies, systems and processes. Such innovation originating from universities usually attracts huge demand from industry. This results in diversified products and market development, which leads to the nation gaining a competitive edge in the world markets.

Such industry-academia linkages are missing in the Indian economy. Universities are meant to play a dual role of knowledge creation and knowledge transfer. But the latter is found wanting in the Indian context. The problem resides in the abysmal quality of the country’s education system that focuses more on quantity than quality from a very early stage. For instance, the focus is always on the number of hours taught rather than the quality of education imparted in those hours.

At every level of education, students are never encouraged to think. Rote-learning is encouraged through an incessant focus on marks, which leaves no scope for thinking or innovation. Further, higher education is mostly outdated and hardly industry-oriented. Therefore, the human capital in India is barely equipped to innovate for industry. Another factor that hinders any industry-academia linkage is an utter lack of clarity on who owns the IP for collaborative innovation. Until these problems persist, any collaboration between industry and academia will be difficult to achieve.

One way to move away from the status quo is to encourage universities to consult industry while designing course curricula so that the graduates are more employable and innovative. The government can also play an enabling role in facilitating higher collaboration. It can provide tax incentives or subsidise setting up of research infrastructure in universities that can be used for industrial innovation. The government could also push for higher academic exchanges by funding the transaction costs involved in the process, which can particularly help in better understanding of what industry requires from academia.

Such initiatives hold the key to driving India’s innovative capacity forward and making the country more competitive.

(Amit Kapoor is chair, Institute for Competitiveness. The views expressed are personal. He can be contacted at [email protected] and tweets @kautiliya. Chirag Yadav, senior researcher, Institute for Competitiveness, has contributed to the article)

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‘Jallianwala Bagh massacre was preceded by reign of terror by the British’

“The massacre on 13 April was part of a policy of oppression unleashed by O’Dwyer against the frequent ‘hartals’ (strikes) or the ‘Satyagraha Movement’ (launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)

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Jallianwala Bagh Massacre
Jallianwala Bagh, 1919: The Real Story : (Flickr)

Chandigarh, Dec 11 : As the country gears up to observe the 100th anniversary of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre of innocent, unarmed Indians by ruthless British forces, the events before and after the April 13, 1919, killing of hundreds clearly indicate that the British rulers of that time were unnerved by the unrest in Punjab in general and Amritsar in particular, which led them to do something which could “teach a lesson” to the Indians.

“Though Brigadier General Reginald Dyer (who ordered his troops to fire on people who had gathered at the Jallianwala Bagh on the fateful day and killed hundreds) was blamed for the action, there is hardly any documented evidence to show how he landed in Amritsar on that day as he was posted in Jalandhar (earlier Jullundur),” author and columnist Kishwar Desai told IANS in an interview here.

Desai, who has penned a book “Jallianwala Bagh, 1919: The Real Story” recently, said that her extensive research on the happenings around the massacre revealed that the British rulers were quite unnerved by the unrest in Punjab and Amritsar.

“Prior to the killings at Jallianwala Bagh, there had been signs of increasing unrest in Punjab. These signs were being interpreted as sedition, even though causes of the unrest were varied. Indeed, it is impossible to understand what happened on 13 April 1919, without an examination of the barbarism unleashed in Punjab under the regime of the then Lieutenant Governor Sir Michael O’Dwyer to suppress the so-called rebellion,” Desai, who is the chair of The Arts and Cultural Heritage Trust that set up the world’s first Partition Museum at Amritsar’s Town Hall, points out in her book.

The author said that the idea to write this book and to bring out “some facets which had not been researched in detail so far” came after she chanced upon a photograph of the burnt-down Town Hall building of Amritsar. This happened in April 1919.

Further investigation and research, according to Desai, led to more evidence of the British atrocities on Indian subjects just before the Jallianwala Bagh incident and the violence that erupted in Amritsar on April 10 in which many people, including five Europeans, were killed. Properties, including the Town Hall, were targeted to protest against the British atrocities.

Disputing the commonly held narrative that the people who had gathered at the Bagh on the fateful day for an anti-Rowlatt Act meeting were outsiders who had come to Amritsar for the Baisakhi festival, Desai points out that the meeting was attended mostly by local residents of Amritsar and no more than 25 per cent of them were from outside.

“And it is very likely that the massacre was a carefully planned one, not spontaneous one as has been often made out. In all likelihood, no women were present,” Desai states in the book, adding that O’Dwyer, who was nearing retirement at that time, and others in power, were upset over the emerging importance of Punjab in the freedom struggle and retaliated with a reign of terror where people were whipped in public, bombed, incarcerated, forced to crawl, starved, beaten, caged and even executed.

“The massacre on 13 April was part of a policy of oppression unleashed by O’Dwyer against the frequent ‘hartals’ (strikes) or the ‘Satyagraha Movement’ (launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)… in fact, the civil administration of Punjab had already declared Amritsar a war zone (around April 11) and regarded the residents as their enemies,” Desai points out in the book.

Dyer, who had arrived in Amritsar from Jullundur on the evening of April 11, had ordered his troops to fire on the gathering inside Jallianwala Bagh on the evening of April 13, 1919. The official death figure was put at 379 while nearly 1,200 were injured. The death toll is often disputed, with claims (Indian National Congress Report) that over 1,000 innocent people were killed.

“Not a very well-known entity” when he arrived in Amritsar, Dyer had a “fairly humdrum career” till he “hit immortality as a mass murderer”, the new book says.

(Jaideep Sarin can be reached at [email protected])

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