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Liverpool comes to be England’s first UNESCO city of music

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Liverpool, birthplace of one of the world’s most famous pop groups the Beatles, was announced  as England’s first Unesco city of Music.

Friday’s accolade comes by 11 years after Unesco made Liverpool’s historic waterfront a world heritage site, Xinhua reported.

Glasgow became the first British city to receive a “City of Music” title in 2008.

Unesco said in a citation the new title has been awarded to the city due to music’s place at the heart of Liverpool’s contemporary culture, education and the economy — from the live music scene to tourism, music management courses and digital businesses.

It was also given to the city based on its commitment to having a clearly defined music, education and skills strategy for young people so that Liverpool can continue to produce world class talent.

The judges highlighted urban festivals like Liverpool International Music Festival (LIMF), Liverpool Sound City and Liverpool Psych Fest that have cemented the city as a haven for music and also helped to develop young industry professionals.

The designation also noted the importance and contribution of established names such as the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Creamfields music festival, and LIPA, the fame school launched by former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney.

Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson said: “Liverpool is renowned for its musical influence and this status is the ultimate, and appropriate, accolade for a city which lives and breathes music.”

“I’m sure with the back of Unesco, this will grow more and people will realize that it is not just about the city’s contribution to music history, but is about the exciting things happening right now.”

Liverpool was one of 47 cities on Friday to join the Unesco Creative Cities Network.

Unesco Director-General Irina Bokova said: “The Unesco Creative Cities Network represents an immense potential to assert the role of culture as enabler of sustainable development.”

“I would like to recognize the more advanced cities and their countries that are embellishing the network with their divergence.”

 

wefornews bureau 

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OBITUARY: Basu Chatterjee – He told stories about you and me

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Basu Chatterjee

One of India”s great storytellers Basu Chatterjee and the high priest of middle cinema in India passed away in Mumbai today. Basu was one of the founding fathers of the new wave cinema, with stark but poignant Sara Akash in 1969, and a fountainhead of middle cinema (along with older colleague Hrishikesh Mukherjee), so popular nowadays. Unlike many of his contemporaries his cinema was not obscure or tedious. A prolific filmmaker he drew upon the cinema of his predecessors Bimal Roy and Hrishikesh Mukherjee and European new wave masters to tell human stories of middle-class Bharat that is India.

What some of our young filmmakers are doing successfully today Basu Da did it four decades ago. Just see his oeuvre — Piya Ka Ghar, Choti Si Baat, Chit Chor, Rajanigandha, Swami, Baton Baton Mein, Manpasand, Priyatama, Manzil, Chakrvyuh, Prem Vivah, Khatta Meetha, Dillagi, Shaukeen, Jeena Yahan, Kamla ki Maut, Ek Ruka hua faisla, Chameli ki Shaadi, Sheesha, Triyacharitra, Gudgudee and many others. He worked with many top stars — Ashok Kumar, Dev Anand, Dharmendra, Rajesh Khanna, Jeetendra, Amitabh Bachchan, Mithun Chakraborty, Anil Kapoor, Hema Malini, Jaya Bachchan, Moushumi Chatterjee, Neetu Singh, Tina (Ambani). At the same time we could see Girish Karnad, Utpal Dutt, Amol Palekar, Farooq Shaikh ,Naseeruddin Shah, Shabana Azmi ,Om Puri, Pankaj Kapur, Vidya Sinha, Mallika Sarabhai and others. He was as familiar with Sarat Chandra as with as with George Bernard Shaw. He often drew on literature for his stories and was equally at home with Manu Bhandari and Paddy Chayefsky. His films were layered but were always simply told. Basu”s cinema was unobtrusive, straight from the heart set in in a familiar milieu.

Always economical in his craft (his film had excellent cinematography by KK Mahajan and AK Bir for the most), he seldom compromised with quality. Much before the trend of casting directors, Basu Chatterjee”s films were always perfectly cast with interesting actors doing small cameos. He had begun his career as a cartoonist (Bal Thackeray and Lakshman were his contemporaries) in the fifties, which gave him his brevity of expression and wit. He had spent his childhood in Mathura and thus had an excellent grasp of the Hindi language. Usually writing his own scripts, his dialogue is laced with everyday lingo and profundities in equal measure. A staunch film society enthusiast he was always up to speed with the best of world cinema, yet he kept his own storytelling simple. Interestingly many of his films had outstanding music and he worked with a range of composers like SD Burman, Salil Chowdhury, RD Burman, Laxmikant Pyarelal, Rajesh Roshan and Bappi Lahiri, who all gave him distinctive scores.

Whether it is middle-class office romance in Rajanigandha or a lower middle class bride discovering her husband and his family in a Mumbai Chawl in Piya ka Ghar, Mumbai local romance of Bandra Christians (Baton Baton Mein), premarital relationships in a conservative middle class setting (Kamala Ki Maut) or the Hindi adaptations of classics like Pygmalion (Man Pasand), Twelve Angry Men (Ek Ruka Hua Faisla) Basu da ”s characters were always well etched out. You would often see simple everyday happenings highlighted in his films. Many of his films had strong women characters –Swami, Chitchor, Jeena Yahan, Apne Paraye, Pasand Apni Apni. Subtle humour expressed quietly was another of his hallmark.

Basu Chatterjee was one of the first filmmakers to successfully take to the small screen. His series on everyday life Rajni (featuring Priya Tendulkar) was the first attempt at consumer guidance on Indian screen. Kakaji Kahin, Byomkesh Bakshi, Darpan and Ek Prem Katha were some of his other landmark serials. If he had been keeping good health in the last few years, I am sure we would have seen some pathbreaking stuff from him on streaming platforms as well.

Though he won several National awards (and many Filmfare awards too), he remains one of the most underrated directors in Indian cinema. He has neither been honoured with Dadasaheb Phalke Award or has been given a Padma award, though many lesser deserving contemporaries have been given these honours. One rarely saw him at gala film parties or award shows. Yet his films will continue to inspire generations of film makers. His passing away brings to a close another great chapter in Indian film history. I am fortunate to have worked with him over the years. We did not meet so often but I was in touch with him until recently and had asked her daughter Rupali to please facilitate my telephonic conversation with him after his recent illness. Unfortunately, that call did not happen. I will always treasure my time spent with him.

By: Amit Khanna

(Amit Khanna wrote lyrics for Basu Chatterjees “Swami” (1977) and “Man Pasand” (1980). He also produced “Man Pasand” and executive-produced the 1997 release, “Gudgudee”)

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Urvashi Rautela: I belong to no religion

The film also features Gautam Gulati, Archana Puran Singh, Delnaaz Irani, Rajiv Gupta and Brijendra Kala, Niki Aneja Walia and Rumana Molla.

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Urvashi Rautela

The social media sensation took to Instagram, where she shared a photograph of herself dressed in a bright yellow blazer, green top and paired it with a chunky neckpiece.

“I belong to no religion. My religion is love. Every heart is my temple. I LOVE U ALL,” she captioned the bright image.

Urvashi also shared a video of herself jumping into the ocean in a white and neon green bikini.

“I jumped back into ocean again and saw the giant fish swimming straight towards me. … with my GoPro until it disappeared into the darkness of the deep ocean,” she wrote.

Urvashi, who made her Bollywood debut in 2013 with with the film “Singh Saab the Great”, was last seen onscreen in the multistarrer film “Pagalpanti”.

Now, the actress, who has a whopping fan following of 26.3 million on Instagram, and 631.2K on Twitter, is waiting for the release of her upcoming film “Virgin Bhanupriya”, which is set for an OTT release.

The film also features Gautam Gulati, Archana Puran Singh, Delnaaz Irani, Rajiv Gupta and Brijendra Kala, Niki Aneja Walia and Rumana Molla.

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Richa Chadha: Must have been a witch in some past life

Richa has taken to gardening with great interest amid lockdown. She feels at a stressful time like this, an activity like gardening could be therapeutic.

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Richa Chadha

Mumbai, June 4 : Actress Richa Chadha has a hilarious reason for liking lightening. She says she must have been a witch in a past life.

Richa took to Instagram Stories, where she shared a photograph of herself with a face pack and sipping on a coffee mug.

“Someone said storm? Must”ve been a witch in some past life, cuz I feel energised by lightening and look forward to storms! Praying for no damage to life and property though,” she captioned the image.

Earlier, Richa, an ardent animal lover, shared a photograph where she holds her cat Kamli.

Richa has taken to gardening with great interest amid lockdown. She feels at a stressful time like this, an activity like gardening could be therapeutic.

On the acting front, the actress was last seen in the court room drama “Section 375”. She currently awaits the release of her upcoming films “Abhi Toh Party Shuru Hui Hai” and “Shakeela”.

–IANS

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