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LFW Winter/Festive 2017 ramp to feature four new models

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Mumbai, June 14: The Lakmé Fashion Week (LFW) Winter/Festive 2017 will give wings to four new talents who are ready to take their first step as models on the platform.

LFW organisers held the model hunt in partnership with TRESemmé for the forthcoming edition. The jury included actress Kriti Sanon, designer Manish Malhotra, fashion choreographer Lubna Adams, IMG Reliance Head of Fashion Jaspreet Chandok, Lakmé Head of Innovation Purnima Lamba and IMG International model scouts – Luis Domingo and Victoria Da Silva.

Kriti felt nostalgic to be back for LFW.

“It feels amazing to be sitting between Manish Malhotra and Lubna Adams and judging these beautiful girls. Also, it is nostalgic to be back at Lakmé Fashion Week where I started my modelling career and walked for around five seasons,” said the actress.

The judges chose four winners after three competitive rounds to walk for the upcoming season: Nicole Padival, Daman Brar, Kiyara and Roshmitha Harimurthy.

The audition saw over 150 aspiring Indian and international models showcase their talent at India’s most sought after model hunt.

For the first time ever, the aspirants also competed for the chance to bag a contract with IMG Models, a leader in talent discovery and model management.

“As a designer, I’m passionate about details. There is something about giving a tactile form to an idea and then further refining it – with colours, embellishments, cuts and accessories, that gives wings to creative imagination. Models are key to telling this story. They lend personification to an attitude that each of my collections represent,” Malhotra said.

“A great personality is the deal-breaker when I’m selecting a model- it’s the grace with which she walks onto the ramp and then goes on to owning it with her poise,” he added.

Lamba said the models showcased “vibrant personalities and a bold freshness”.

LFW is credited with introducing some of the most successful faces in the Indian fashion industry including Deepika Padukone, Katrina Kaif, and Yana Gupta to name a few.

IANS

 

Fashion

Things to keep in mind while buying leather shoes

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Leather shoes
Representational Image

New Delhi, June 22: Shoes are a crucial part of a wardrobe especially the leather ones. A right pair can accentuate your look whereas a wrong choice can break your entire look no matter how great the outfit so opt for the one that suits your personality, comfort.

Ritesh Srivastava, CEO at Elitify.com and Jyoti Narula, Director at JOE SHU share a few tips to keep in mind while buying a pair of genuine leather shoes.

* Shoe surface: The tactile feel of the shoe surface plays a significant role in deciding the authenticity of leather by the buyer. A pair of genuine leather shoes will usually have a sanded and refinished surface. It would not have a plastic feel or artificial finish that is common with faux leather.

* The insole: One should examine the detailing of the inner lining of the shoes which is another important indicator of quality. Genuine leather shoes will have an extra padded insole that works as a cushion between the feet and the shoes giving comfort and ensuring a sturdy grip.

* Price factor: As a general rule genuine leather costs more. It demands a relatively higher cost for the kind of durability, aesthetic appeal and fine detailing it brings to the footwear.

* Finishing and stitching: Aesthetics play a very important role while choosing a pair of shoes. An elegant silhouette is what adds to instant appeal along with its perfect coloration. The stitching should also be neat and smooth, thereby depicting attention to detail. More so in handcrafted or hand painted shoes.

* Comfort: A fine craftsman of shoes will always focus on comfort along with the styling. There is nothing worse than a shoe that bites.

* Rich fragrance of leather: A crucial point in identifying a real leather shoe is its smell. A shoe made of genuine leather will always carry a rich fragrance which is a natural odour. Authentic leather will never smell of chemicals or plastic.

* The sole: Sole is an important indicator of quality. The better the sole and the lining the more comfort and grip it offers. The shoes should always be light in weight. An extra layer of the sole between the shoe body and the feet will give freedom to the wearer for long hours.

IANS

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Can yoga make the cut for Olympics?

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

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Yoga

On a day when yoga is having to jostle for mind space with a hugely popular sporting event like the FIFA World Cup, many fans of the ancient regimen are seriously dreaming up for a world cup of their own. Are they getting too carried away by the euphoria around of the 4th International Day of Yoga? Or is it a case of trusting yoga’s extreme versatility to adapt itself to the demands of the time?

Will there ever be a time when a Yoga World Cup driving up a mania like the FIFA World Cup does? As yoga gets mainstreamed big time in the last four years, a debate on whether it can become a competitive sport has actually begun. The jury is still out with both sides of the divide putting out equally tenable and credible arguments.

It’s only natural that the voices for and against will get louder and more competitive. Being the unofficial benefactor of yoga, India is expected to take an unequivocal call.

Unfortunately, we have seen quite a flip-flop on this. After deciding to treat yoga as a sport in 2015, the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports (MYAS) reversed the decision in the following year.

Giving in to the Puritans who frowned at any dilution of its spiritual core, it concluded yoga has quite a many subtle elements in which competitions are not possible. Many watchers see a not-so-yogic hand in this change of heart. Some of them ascribe to it a compromised arraignment to end a tug of war between MYAS and the Ministry of AYUSH over the control of yoga.

Surely, yoga isn’t just about asanas or body postures. According to the eight-limb (Ashtanga) paradigm of yoga, the other dimensions include such subtle things as adherence to social and personal ethics, control of breathing and senses and one-pointedness and meditation. It will be next to impossible to draw up a championship format for these realms of activities. Yet, sport-yoga is not a dead dream.

While it wouldn’t be possible to adapt the whole philosophy of yoga into competitive sports, we shouldn’t underestimate yoga’s flexibility to adapt itself. From being an ancient spiritual pursuit for those seeking enlightenment and becoming a hippies’ fad, yoga has shown remarkable flexibility to become the most-chanted lifestyle mantra of today.

The point is that some kind of competitive sports based on one or more limbs of yoga is a distinct possibility. Though it may not live up to the loftier promises, yoga-based games and sports will do no harm. Instead, they will do a lot of good to the cause of yoga promotion. Yoga as a sport will comfort quite a many who see a baggage of faith and welcome the greatest number of people.

Though some fear a dilution, not all yoga protagonists are against such an innovation. Big names have openly spoken about taking yoga to the Olympics. Going by the rising global craze for yoga, mats are going to roll sooner in the sporting arena. The real challenge will be in drawing up a competitive format that not only conforms to the definition of modern sports, but also doesn’t dilute the core. I don’t see any difficulties in making yoga “amusing”, “leisurely”, or “entertaining”. When martial arts and gymnastics can qualify and even make it to Olympics, asanas, the most primed candidate for being turned into competitive sports, can definitely make the cut!

Traditional yogis who swear by the spiritual and philosophical lineage of yoga need not worry. The tradition is on their side. The eight limbs of yoga are so interconnected that even if one does asanas, and that too as an exercise or a game, the practitioner is most likely to experience other dimensions like meditation, one-pointedness and bliss.

Even asanas, the most gross form of yoga, hold out endless promises. Maharishi’s Patanjali Yoga Sutra envisions asanas as a means of attaining what’s beyond the obvious. That means that adapting them into competitive sports isn’t likely to rob them of the power to unveil the Infinity.

Is it time then to tick a Perfect 10 on that gravity-defying Sirsasana?

(A former journalist, M. Rajaque Rahman is a full-time volunteer of the Art of Living. He can be reached at [email protected])

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Lifestyle

Yoga Day 2018: Present-age guides to yog and its health benefits

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Yoga

New Delhi, June 21: Is yoga just about being twisted into different positions like a pretzel or sitting cross-legged on a mat with closed eyes?

One might think of it as a class where you learn to twist your body but multiple gurus from Paramahansa Yogananda to Baba Ramdev, the yoga tycoon of the contemporary age, who have had a contribution in publicising Yoga in India and the world have popularised it as an ancient philosophy, much more than a mere physical activity and something which needs to be understood in order to fully benefit from it.

In December 2014, United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted an India-led resolution recognising that “yoga provides a holistic approach to health and well-being” and declared June 21 as International Day of Yoga.

Since the time when Yoga gained prominence, the market has been inundated with books on
Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga and Bikram Yoga which are certainly among the most popular types.

A recently launched read written by Madan Kataria endorses something called Laughter Yoga, which is slowly making its way to the ashrams, gyms and fitness centres.

Kataria in his book, “Laughter Yoga”, published by Penguin, speaks of various ways of practicing Yoga with an abundance of laughter. The book costs Rs 250 and has 230
pages.

“…I credit laughter yoga with giving me the ability to walk through this dark valley to the light and happiness on the other side,” he writes.

He says that laughter triggers the release of a cocktail of chemicals and hormones that are extremely beneficial and crucial to good health.

Theories and researches confirm that humour plays for people in situations such as dealing with misfortune, making sense of rule violations, and bonding with others, we propose that underlying each of these theories are the physiological benefits of laughter.

“We draw on findings from empirical studies on laughter to demonstrate that these physiological benefits occur regardless of the theory that is used to explain the humour function.

Findings from these studies have important implications for nurse practitioners working in hospice settings, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, and hospitals,” says research done at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at Bethesda, Maryland.

Another new book in the market, “Yoga Shakti” by Shailaja Menon, is a like a catalogue of various yoga exercises presented on glossy pages alongside pictures demonstrating them. Published by Niyogi, the book costs Rs 495 and consists of 179 pages.

Menon, in the book, critiques the notion that yoga is a class where you learn to twist your body into different asanas.

Using personal experiences, she explains the origins of the philosophy and recommends daily exercises to help introduce beginners to it.

When we experience major trauma, the instinctive reaction is to shrink, Menon in her book writes, to the contrary the invitation of life and yoga is to keep expanding to keep evolving.

IANS

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