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Kulbhushan Jadhav case: Pakistan to file counter-memorial on July 17

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Islamanbad:Pakistan will be filing its second counter-memorial in the International Court of Justice on the conviction of alleged Indian spy Kulbhushan Jadhav on July 17, an official said on Thursday.

On January 23, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) gave a timeline to both Pakistan and India for filing another round of memorials in the case. The counter-memorial is a written pleading in a contentious case before the ICJ.

“Our team has prepared a comprehensive reply to Indian rejoinder, which will be filed on July 17,” Foreign Office spokesman Muhammad Faisal said in a press briefing here.

Pakistan’s top attorney Khawar Qureshi had briefed Prime Minister Nasirul Mulk about the memorial last week during a meeting that was also attended by Attorney General Khalid Javed Khan and other senior officials.

Faisal said that Pakistan on December 13 last year had filed its counter-memorial before the ICJ, a world court in The Hague which is looking into the Indian complaint on the conviction Jadhav.

India had on April 17 submitted its second memorial in the court.

According to the report after the submission of the second counter-memorial, which will be filed on July 17, the ICJ will fix the matter for hearing, which is likely to take place next year.

He said the hearing of the case would start after the completion of submissions by both New Delhi and Islamabad.

However, a senior lawyer, who has expertise in international litigation, told the Express News that there was no chance of hearing the case in the on-going year. Even the hearing of other matters has already been fixed until March/April next year, therefore, the Kulbhushan Jadhav case will be listed in summer next year, he added.

On September 13 last year, India submitted a 22-page memorandum wherein it objected to Jadhav being tried by a military court in Pakistan. India had contended that Jadhav’s trial should have been conducted by a civilian court and that Pakistan was bound to give him consular access.

The ICJ on May 18 last year halted the execution of Jadhav, who was sentenced to death by a military court on April 10 after being convicted on charges of terrorism and espionage.

Jadhav was allegedly apprehended on March 3, 2016, after he illegally crossed into Pakistan via the Iran border.

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Lake Victoria ferry crash: 44 dead, Search on for hundreds missing

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Photo: Representational Image

Washington, Sep 21 : At least 44 people were killed when a passenger ferry carrying hundreds capsized in Tanzania’s Lake Victoria on Thursday while rescue teams have launched search operation for hundreds of missing ferry passengers on Friday.

The rescuers were also retrieving bodies from the water.Only 37 people were rescued from the water before poor visibility halted operations.
The accident took place on Thursday between two islands in Lake Victoria, the largest lake in Africa, which straddles the borders of Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya.

The exact number of those on board wasn’t immediately known because the ferry was overloaded, according to media reports.

Reports varied but the ferry may have carried between 400 and 500 people.

Regional Commissioner John Mongella told Tanzanian television channel ITV that emergency teams would continue their search on Friday morning.

Boat disasters are frequent on Tanzania’s waters, where ferries often exceed their capacity.

Some 200 people were killed after an overloaded vessel hit strong winds off the island of Zanzibar in the Indian Ocean in 2011.The boat had a capacity of 620 passengers but was carrying over 1,000 people.

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Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang dies at age 61

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Sep 21 : Vietnam President Tran Dai Quang, one of the country’s top three leaders, died on Friday after an a “serious illness” state television and radio announced.

Quang, 61, died in a military hospital in Hanoi from a “serious illness despite efforts by domestic and international doctors and professors”, Vietnam Television reported.

President Tran Dai died at 10:05 am on the 21st of September at the military hospital,” the official Vietnam News Agency said.

Quang had passed away “despite efforts by domestic and international doctors and professors,” Vietnam Television reported.

He did not appear in public for more than a month last year, raising questions about his health. His last public appearance was at a Politburo meeting and a reception for a Chinese delegation on Wednesday.

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Muslims, STs, Dalits made most progress in combating poverty: UN

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United Nations: While India has taken tremendous strides in combating poverty in the past decade, Muslims, members of the Scheduled Tribes (ST) and Dalits saw the most progress in reducing the impact of poverty, according to data compiled in a UN project.

The “very positive trend” during the decade between 2005-06 and 2015-16 in India is that “the poorest are catching up”, Sabina Alkire, Director of the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHDI), said on Thursday at the presentation of the 2018 Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) here.

The MPI prepared by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the OPHDI, takes into account various indicators of development rather than just income and aligns them to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, while serving as a measure of the intensity of poverty felt by different groups.

While ST members were still the poorest group, they have seen the fastest reduction in MPI, as have the Dalits, Alkire said.

Explaining it, Diego Zavaleta Reyles from OPHDI told IANS that the average number of deprivations or “the intensity of their poverty” measured by the MPI fell for these groups even though the proportion of poor people in these categories was relatively the same or unchanged.

Between 2006 and 2016, the MPI of the STs came down from 0.447 to 0.229 even though the percentage had fallen only from 79.8 to 50 during the decade, according to OPHDI data.

During the same period, the MPI of Dalits fell from 0.338 to 0.145 while the percentage of poor came down from 65 to 32.9.

“If we look at the religious groups, the Muslims are the poorest and they again had the fastest reduction in MPI,” Alkire said.

While MPI for Muslims was 0.331 in 2006, it fell to 0.144 in 2016, and the percentage of the poor in the community came down from 60.3 per cent to 31.1 per cent.

Nationally, 54.7 per cent of the people in all groups taken together were poor in 2006, but only 27.5 per cent in 2016, and the MPI came down from 0.279 to 0.121, the data show.

In terms of numbers, 271 million people had moved out of poverty during the decade, with the number of poor people coming down 635 million in 2005-06 to 364 million according to the MPI standards.

But “we are seeing a shift of global proportions occurring in India over a ten-year period and that is really encouraging”, Alkire said.

India is the only country for which changes of this magnitude are taking place at this time, she added.

Bihar remains the poorest state, but along with other high-poverty states – Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Chhatisgarh – had the fastest reduction in multi-dimensional poverty, she said.

In spite of the progress, these states still remain the poorest.

Among age groups, children, who are still the poorest, saw the fastest reduction in MPI, she said.

Such reduction in poverty among these groups or states did had not happened in India in the earlier periods according to a previous study for the period 1998-1999 to 2005-06, she said.

UNDP Administrator Adam Steiner said that when governments start looking carefully at who the poor are and where they are, the analysis leads to programmes that help the poorest of the poor, whether by ethnicity, religion or geography, and results like those in India can be achieved.

Traditional poverty measures – often calculated by numbers of people who earn less than $1.90 a day – shed light on how little people earn but not on whether or how they experience poverty in their day-to-day lives, according to UNDP.

On the other hand, MPI takes into account health, education and living standards in areas like access to clean water, sanitation, nutrition and primary education, with those lacking in at least a third of these defined as multi-dimensionally poor.

According to the income-based measurement, only 270 million Indians are considered poor but according to the MPI standards a far larger number – 364 million — were categorised as multi-dimensionally poor in 2016.

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