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Know why casual sex is not so cool?

Person’s preference for casual sex may actually hike their risk of being harassed

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London, March 17: Does a one-night stand or romping without any commitment or emotional involvement sound good to you? If yes, then it’s time to beware as Researchers have found that preferring casual sex may land you in a trouble.

The researchers concluded that a person’s liking for casual sex may actually increase their risk of being harassed.

Also, youngsters who have been sexually harassed are more strongly inclined to have casual sex than others, the findings revealed.

The results might suggest that it is the victim’s fault for being harassed, but the researchers said their findings were not intended to “blame the victim”.

“Absolutely not! We’re trying to understand the psychological mechanisms that underlie harassment,” said Mons Bendixen, Associate Professor at Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway.

It might be that a preference for casual sex leads to more sexual solicitations in general, including undesirable ones.

The study, published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior, also informed that adolescents who sexually harass others have had casual sex more often than those who do not harass others.

They also fantasise more about casual sex and find it more acceptable to have sex without any commitment or emotional closeness.

The study included 1,326 heterosexual girls and boys around the age of 18 years. The psychologists only looked at non-physical forms of sexual harassment.

Fully 60 percent of the girls and boys during the study revealed that they had been sexually harassed in the last year.

Nearly 30 percent of the girls and 45 percent of the boys have admitted that they had sexually harassed someone one or more times.

 Wefornews Bureau

Lifestyle

‘Minorities have complete freedom in Pakistan’

According to the London-based Minority Rights Group International, ethnic minorities in Pakistan include Sindhis (14.1 per cent), Pashtuns (15.42 per cent), Mohajirs (7.57 per cent), Baluchis (3.57 per cent).

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Karachi, Feb 24 : Members of minority groups in Pakistan can practice their religion openly and move about with complete freedom in the Muslim-majority country, a Minister has clamed.

While visiting the Swami Narayan Temple in Karachi on Sunday, provincial minister Nasir Hussain Shah vowed to protect the rights of minorities, reports The Express Tribune.

He commended the role and contribution that minorities have played in the development and progress of Pakistan, adding that he had come to the temple with a message of peace.

On behalf of the government, he also announced that 10,000 copies of the Bhagavad Gita would soon be distributed.

According to the London-based Minority Rights Group International, ethnic minorities in Pakistan include Sindhis (14.1 per cent), Pashtuns (15.42 per cent), Mohajirs (7.57 per cent), Baluchis (3.57 per cent).

Religious minorities include Christians (1.59 per cent), Ahmadis (0.22 per cent), Hindus (1.6 per cent), Shias, Isma’ilis, Bohras, Parsis and Sikhs.

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Lifestyle

Why most young women are stressed about their sex lives

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Sydney, Feb 23 (IANS) More than half of young women in Australia experience some form of sexually-related personal distress — feeling guilty, embarrassed, stressed or unhappy about their sex lives.

A study conducted Monash University reported, for the first time, an overall picture of the sexual wellbeing of Australian women between the ages of 18 and 39.

Results showed 50.2 per cent of young Australian women experienced some form of sexually-related personal distress, with one in five women having at least one female sexual dysfunction (FSD).

A concerning 29.6 per cent of women experienced sexually-related personal distress without dysfunction, and 20.6 per cent had at least one FSD.

The most common problem was low sexual self-image, which caused distress for 11 per cent of study participants.

Arousal, desire, orgasm and responsiveness dysfunction affected 9 per cent, 8 per cent, 7.9 per cent and 3.4 per cent of the study cohort, respectively, revealed the findings published in the international journal, Fertility and Sterility.

“It is of great concern that one in five young women have an apparent sexual dysfunction and half of all women within this age group experience sexually-related personal distress,” said Susan Davis, senior author and Professor of Women’s Health at Monash University.

“This is a wake-up call to the community and signals the importance of health professionals being open and adequately prepared to discuss young women’s sexual health concerns.”

The study, funded by Grollo Ruzzene Foundation, recruited 6,986 women aged 18-39 years, living in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland.

All women completed a questionnaire that assessed their sexual wellbeing in terms of desire, arousal, responsiveness, orgasm, and self-image.

Participants also evaluated whether they had sexually-associated personal distress and provided extensive demographic information.

Sexual self-image dysfunction was associated with being overweight, obese, living together with partner, not married, married and breastfeeding.

Professor Davis said if untreated, sexually-related personal distress and FSD could impact relationships and overall quality of life as women aged.

Women who habitually monitored their appearance, and for whom appearance determined their level of physical self-worth, reported being less sexually assertive and more self-conscious during intimacy, and experienced lower sexual satisfaction.

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Lifestyle

Obesity at younger age? Bariatric surgery may help

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New Delhi, Researchers have found that surgical treatment of obesity is as effective for individuals who developed the disorder early, by the age of 20, as for those who have developed obesity later in life.

The results, published in the journal Diabetes Care, are based on data from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. For the findings, the researchers covered a total of 4,026 adult individuals who had developed obesity. Half of them had undergone bariatric surgery and the other half were a control group.

“We were somewhat surprised at the results. Since the group that had already developed obesity by the age of 20 had been exposed to obesity and its risks for longer periods, we’d expected that bariatric surgical treatment in these participants would be less effective in terms of weight loss and obesity-related sequelae than in the other group.

But it wasn’t like that,” said study researcher Johanna Andersson Assarsson from University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Each of the groups was divided into three subgroups, based on the participants’ body mass index (BMI) at age 20: those of normal weight, those who were overweight, and those with obesity.

The researchers then investigated whether there was any difference in the effects of bariatric treatment for obesity among those who had developed the disorder before age 20, compared with those who developed it later in life.

“On the contrary, the group with obesity at age 20 lost a little bit more weight after the operation, and there was no difference in effects on diabetes or its complications, cardiovascular disease or cancer, compared with individuals who developed obesity later in life,” Assarsson said.

According to the researchers, for many diseases, early treatment is advantageous, but individuals with early-onset obesity have often had their disorder for a long time before bariatric surgery is considered.

It has sometimes been speculated that bariatric surgical treatment would be less effective in these individuals because of their longer exposure to the adverse health effects of obesity.

“Here, we show that’s not the case. And we think it’s important that this information reaches people considering bariatric surgery for obesity and also health professionals who treat patients with obesity,” Assarsson said.

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