Karnataka deploys 1,763 new doctors to treat Covid patients

Regretting that many government doctors also work in private hospitals, clinics and nursing homes, the minister said as a result, marginal and poor patients were deprived of their timely service and treatment.
Doctors

Bengaluru, June 3 : Amid the pandemic’s second wave, Karnataka on Wednesday deployed 1,763 doctors who were recruited recently to treat Covid patients in government hospitals across the southern state.

“The doctors have been recruited as part of our plan to improve the healthcare infrastructure in the state and prepare for the pandemic’s potential third wave, likely to hit later this year,” said state Health Minister K. Sudhakar.

Addressing the new doctors in a virtual meeting, Sudhakar said they should change the perception of the people about state-run hospitals by working with dedication and commitment.

“You should make healthcare services at state-run hospitals world class by providing quality treatment and strive hard to change people’s perception of our health infrastructure,” said Sudakhar, a medical doctor by profession.

Terming the mass recruitment of doctors amid the pandemic historic, the minister said it was for the first time that so many (1,763) doctors were hired by the state health department at a time directly than by the Karnataka State Public Service Commission.

“The recruitment process was completed in a record 6 months to depute more doctors for treating Covid cases, which surged exponentially during the second wave since mid-April and overwhelmed our heath infrastructure,” said Sudhakar.

Noting that for various reasons, people look down upon government hospitals and go to private hospitals for treatment though costlier, the minister said the doctors should change people’s attitude towards them by providing quality service and care through human touch.

“The pancha (five) sutras (precepts) for all doctors are patient-centricity, punctuality, quality treatment, hospital upkeep and commitment, which will make people prefer government hospital to a private or a corporate hospital, especially in cities and towns across the state,” asserted Sudhakar.

Though state-run hospitals have quality medical infrastructure and facilities, the minister said middle-class and upper-class patients prefer private hospitals even if costly because of the quality treatment and care they get there from their doctors, nurses and support staff.

“While most government hospitals are in sprawling campuses and prime locations in cities and towns, their upkeep is rather poor. We need to change by ensuring hygiene and cleanliness. Our service standards should match that of private hospitals,” reiterated Sudhakar.

Regretting that many government doctors also work in private hospitals, clinics and nursing homes, the minister said as a result, marginal and poor patients were deprived of their timely service and treatment.

“The state government spends lot of money and resources in churning doctors through its medical colleges. It is their primary duty to serve patients who are from lower strata of society. Doctors are bridges linking the government and people,” he added.

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