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Jewels for summer weddings: Pearl strands, multi-layered strings

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New Delhi, March 28:Ditch chunky neck jewellery in the scorching heat. Go for pearl strings or delicate multi-layer pieces when you attend a summer wedding.

Manju Kothari (Creative Director at Entice Jewellery), Rajesh Tulsiani (Director at Dwarkadas Chandumal Jewellers) and Chitwn D Malhotra (lead designer and founder Dillano Luxurious Jewels Pvt Ltd) have tips on jewellery trends that could be followed:

* Pearls can never go out of style and have always been a constant favourite adornment on weddings for all the right reasons. They balance your entire look with royalty and go well with all skin tones and wedding lehenga colours.

They are a meek epitome of a gleaming bead but without being overly dramatic, and are multipurpose.

* Multi-layer neckpiece will give you a completely traditional look on your wedding day and allows you to mix and match multiple elements to create a chromatic upshot that is uniquely your own.

multi color jewellry3

Necklaces are always attention-grabbing. Lustrous necklaces will help you to enhance your entire bridal assemble and are easy to carry even in a warm weather. They can give you a variety of looks from simple and understated to perky and bling.

* Arm cuffs: Clutching up on the forearm, though tiny in size, these accessories make just as much of an impression with your other jewellery, foremost ornaments. Your choice in arm cuffs should be equally bold to balance your overall look.

Arm cuffs 1

* Head-turning earrings: They should be equally sparkly, but somewhat lighter in design to avoid a melodramatic look. With typical diamond or pearl wedding jewellery, a pair of elegant drop hoops will highlight the rest of your accessories.

earing

* Opt for colours that celebrate the season and add a dimension to your outfit. Coloured stones and gemstones in various settings will uplift the outfit and add a splash of colour.

* Choose comfortable jewellery for hands. If haathphools are not suitable and it does not match your style, then go for chunky cocktail rings studded with coloured gemstones.

* Palm cuffs are also trendy and prefect to coordinate with summer wedding ensemble.
Palm cuff 2

 

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Lifestyle

This Independence Day, savour famous delicacies from different regions

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Independence day food

New Delhi, Aug 14: There is no denying the fact that Indian food is as vast as its culture and lifestyle. The taste buds of Indians span beyond their regions as every part has its own speciality. So why not try some of the famous delicacies from different regions this Independence Day.

Here is a list of some famous Indian delicacies from the different regions to savour this Independence Day, penned down by Yogesh Ghorpade, CEO and Founder, Uplodefoodie and Purba Kalita, Co-Founder of SaleBhai.

* Modur Pulav (Kashmir): A delicious aromatic rice dish famous in Valley of Kashmir, Modur Pulav is sweet, and has saffron as its primary colour, the top colour in our tiranga. It has spices, mix of dry fruits, loads of ghee, and fruits like apples, pomegranate and pineapples. It can also be relished with with paneer masala gravy and tangy Indian pickles.

* Modak (Maharashtra): Modak is an Indian sweet dish popular in Maharashtra mainly. Filled with coconut and jaggery, it is served as a Prasad in front of Lord Ganesha during Ganesh Chaturthi. It can be fried or steamed but it is mostly preferred steamed hot in ghee by Indians.

* Murukku (Tamil Nadu and Kerala): Considered as one of the best tea-time snacks, Murukku is made from rice flour and urad dal flour. It is an integral part of the South Indian cuisine and is tasty and relatively easy to prepare. One can easily make these in a large batch and enjoy leisurely whenever there is a craving for a quick snack.

* Narikol (Assam): Coconuts have significance for the Hindus and are nutritious indeed. Made from tender coconut rolled into balls, Narikol is one of the most famous dishes in Assam and is especially seen a lot around Bihu. This can also be preserved for more than a week if kept in a dry air-tight container.

* Sarson Da Saag (Punjab and Haryana): One of the most popular Punjabi vegetarian delicacies is makke ki roti with sarson da saag. This famous combination is a flat-bread and mustard leaves gravy, prepared with different spices. Wash it down with a cool and refreshing glass of lassi.

* Mysore Pak (Karnataka): Mysore Pak is a South Indian dessert prepared with generous amounts of sugar, ghee, fragrant cardamom, and gram flour. It was first whipped up in the royal kitchen of the Mysore Palace and till date, it is considered the king of sweets down south.

* Rosogulla (West Bengal): The battle between West Bengal and Odisha claiming rosogolla as their own might have ended in the former’s favour, but none of that bitterness has trickled into the treat itself – the spongy, sweet, and delicious mithai that is a must in every East Indian celebration.

* Ghevar (Rajasthan): Rajasthani cuisine is marked by its savory dishes and succulent desserts. Among the latter, ghevar is probably the most drool worthy. This disc-shaped cake is made with mawa, ghee, and malai ghewar.

IANS

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Lifestyle

Men too care for their partner’s well-being: Study

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London, Aug 14: Women, please take note. If you think that your spouse does not care for your well-being the way you do then you may be wrong, a new study has found.

The findings suggest that men respond to their spouse’s illness just as much as women do and reject previous studies suggesting that female caregivers tend to be more responsive.

“We found that unlike many previous studies on care-giving in later life — male caregivers were just as responsive towards their partner’s onset of illness as female caregivers,” said lead author Laura Langner from the University of Oxford in Britain.

For the study, published in the Journals of Gerontology, Series B, the team involved 538 couples in Germany with an average age of 69, where one of them had developed the need for spousal care, between 2001-2015.

They looked at how caregivers adjusted their hours in response to the new care need — whether directly responding to their physical needs or performing errands and housework.

The researchers found that men increased their care hours as much as women did, resulting in similar levels of care once their partner became ill.

These similarities were particularly pronounced when a spouse was deemed severely ill, then there was little to no difference in the level of care given.

Perhaps surprisingly, when their spouse is severely ill, men also increase the time they spend on housework and errands, more than women, the researchers said.

There were also significant differences in the levels of care given for couples where the spouse was only unofficially seen to be ‘in need of care’.

However, these differences disappeared in homes where no other household help was provided, when regardless of gender, male or female, spouses stepped up to care for each other, the researchers noted.

IANS

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Lifestyle

What generates pessimistic mood?

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Woman

New York, Aug 14: Scientists have identified a brain region that could generate pessimistic moods in disorders such as anxiety or depression that leads people to focus more on the possible downside than the potential benefit in a stressful situation.

In a study tested on animals, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found that stimulating caudate nucleus — a brain region linked to emotional decision-making –induced animals to make negative decisions.

The caudate nucleus, has within it regions that are connected with the limbic system, which regulates mood, and sends input to motor areas of the brain as well as dopamine-producing regions.

The study showed that the animals gave far more weight to the anticipated drawback of a situation than its benefit, compared to when the region was not stimulated.

This pessimistic decision-making could continue through the day after the original stimulation.

“We feel we were seeing a proxy for anxiety, or depression, or some mix of the two,” said Ann Graybiel, a professor at the MIT.

In the study, which appeared in the journal Neuron, the team wanted to see if they could reproduce an effect that is often seen in people with depression, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

The team stimulated the caudate nucleus with a small electrical current as animals were offered a reward (juice) paired with an unpleasant stimulus (a puff of air to the face).

The results showed that the cost-benefit calculation became skewed, and the animals began to avoid combinations that they previously would have accepted.

This continued even after the stimulation ended, and could also be seen the following day, after which point it gradually disappeared.

This result suggests that the animals began to devalue the reward that they previously wanted, and focused more on the cost of the aversive stimulus.

“This state we’ve mimicked has an overestimation of cost relative to benefit,” Graybiel noted.

The researchers also found that brainwave activity in the caudate nucleus was altered when decision-making patterns changed.

“There must be many circuits involved,” she said.

“But apparently we are so delicately balanced that just throwing the system off a little bit can rapidly change behaviour.”

IANS

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