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Govt not averse to out-of-court solution on Ram Mandir: Naqvi

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New Delhi/Lucknow, Nov 14: Union Minority Affairs Minister Mukhtar Abbas Naqvi on Tuesday said the government is not averse to any out-of-court solution to Ram Janmabhoomi-Babri Mosque dispute in Ayodhya, adding  it is “not involved” in any offers to negotiate by anyone.

His remarks comes in the wake of Art of Living Foundation head Sri Sri Ravi Shankar to mediate in the long-simmering dispute.

“If all the parties concerned or the stakeholders reach a consensus on the issue, nothing like it. It will be an ideal situation. This issue should be resolved. If it is resolved through dialogue and consensus it is good, otherwise the matter is already in the court and the court will decide,” Naqvi said.

When asked Art of Living founder Sri Sri Ravi Shankar has offered to mediate at the behest of the Centre, the Minister said  “If some people are trying to mediate in the matter to find an amicable solution, there is no harm in it. But the government is not involved in any kind of mediation etc.”

Late last month, the AoL founder had expressed his willingness to mediate in the matter, following which the Shia Waqf Board Chairman Waseem Rizvi met him on October 31 and welcomed the offer.

After the meeting, Rizvi said the entire nation respected the AoL founder and that the Shia community was of the view that the dispute should be resolved amicably and not by confrontation.

However, on Monday after Sri Sri announced that he would soon be visiting Ayodhya regarding this, All India Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen (AIMIM) President Asaduddin Owaisi dismissed his offer as “kite flying”.

“The All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) has clearly stated that they will not accept any such offer, he (Sri Sri Ravi Shankar) should not indulge in any kite flying,” Owaisi asserted.

Meanwhile, as per his schedule, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar before visiting to temple town will meet Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, his representative Bhavya Tej said in Lucknow.

He said that he has informed both Muslim and Hindu leaders involved in the mater that “Guru ji” would be in Ayodhya to discuss with them ways to resolve the Ram Janmabhoomi-Babri Mosque dispute in Ayodhya..

Sri Sri is likely to arrive in  Ayodhya on Thursday afternoon and is expected to meet the head of the Ram Janma Bhoomi Nyaas, Mahant Nritya Gopal Das at Maniram Chawni, and later hold deliberations with Ram Vilas Vedanti and Iqbal Ansari.

Wefornews Bureau 

India

Jammu & Kashmir: 3 Cops killed as Terrorists attack police post in Shopian

A police picket was put up to guard members of the minority community in Zainpora village, which was attacked.

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Srinagar, Dec 11 : Three Jammu and Kashmir Police officials were killed on Tuesday in Shopian district in a militant attack, police said, in which four service rifles were also stolen.

A police picket was put up to guard members of the minority community in Zainpora village, which was attacked.

“Three policemen were killed and one sustained critical injuries,” a police official said.

A manhunt was underway.

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Identity of rape victims has to be protected: Supreme Court

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Supreme Court of India

New Delhi, Dec 11: The Supreme Court on Tuesday said that the identity of rape victims has to be protected at all stages of the case including during trial.

A bench of Justices Madan B. Lokur, S. Abdul Nazeer and Deepak Gupta said that the Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL) reports and other documents related to such cases would be handed over to the trial court in a sealed cover without disclosing the identity of the victims.

Speaking for the bench, Justice Gupta advised the media to avoid sensationalising rape cases for the purpose of increasing the TRP and ordered that identity of minor rape victims cannot be disclosed even by their families.

The court verdict came on a PIL by advocate Nipun Saxena who had moved the court seeking steps for the safety of women in public places.

The petition was filed in the aftermath of the December 16, 2012, Delhi gangrape case.

“The media has not only the right but also duty to report” the cases of sexual assault but “should refrain from interviewing the victim”, it said.

IANS

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‘Jallianwala Bagh massacre was preceded by reign of terror by the British’

“The massacre on 13 April was part of a policy of oppression unleashed by O’Dwyer against the frequent ‘hartals’ (strikes) or the ‘Satyagraha Movement’ (launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)

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Jallianwala Bagh Massacre
Jallianwala Bagh, 1919: The Real Story : (Flickr)

Chandigarh, Dec 11 : As the country gears up to observe the 100th anniversary of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre of innocent, unarmed Indians by ruthless British forces, the events before and after the April 13, 1919, killing of hundreds clearly indicate that the British rulers of that time were unnerved by the unrest in Punjab in general and Amritsar in particular, which led them to do something which could “teach a lesson” to the Indians.

“Though Brigadier General Reginald Dyer (who ordered his troops to fire on people who had gathered at the Jallianwala Bagh on the fateful day and killed hundreds) was blamed for the action, there is hardly any documented evidence to show how he landed in Amritsar on that day as he was posted in Jalandhar (earlier Jullundur),” author and columnist Kishwar Desai told IANS in an interview here.

Desai, who has penned a book “Jallianwala Bagh, 1919: The Real Story” recently, said that her extensive research on the happenings around the massacre revealed that the British rulers were quite unnerved by the unrest in Punjab and Amritsar.

“Prior to the killings at Jallianwala Bagh, there had been signs of increasing unrest in Punjab. These signs were being interpreted as sedition, even though causes of the unrest were varied. Indeed, it is impossible to understand what happened on 13 April 1919, without an examination of the barbarism unleashed in Punjab under the regime of the then Lieutenant Governor Sir Michael O’Dwyer to suppress the so-called rebellion,” Desai, who is the chair of The Arts and Cultural Heritage Trust that set up the world’s first Partition Museum at Amritsar’s Town Hall, points out in her book.

The author said that the idea to write this book and to bring out “some facets which had not been researched in detail so far” came after she chanced upon a photograph of the burnt-down Town Hall building of Amritsar. This happened in April 1919.

Further investigation and research, according to Desai, led to more evidence of the British atrocities on Indian subjects just before the Jallianwala Bagh incident and the violence that erupted in Amritsar on April 10 in which many people, including five Europeans, were killed. Properties, including the Town Hall, were targeted to protest against the British atrocities.

Disputing the commonly held narrative that the people who had gathered at the Bagh on the fateful day for an anti-Rowlatt Act meeting were outsiders who had come to Amritsar for the Baisakhi festival, Desai points out that the meeting was attended mostly by local residents of Amritsar and no more than 25 per cent of them were from outside.

“And it is very likely that the massacre was a carefully planned one, not spontaneous one as has been often made out. In all likelihood, no women were present,” Desai states in the book, adding that O’Dwyer, who was nearing retirement at that time, and others in power, were upset over the emerging importance of Punjab in the freedom struggle and retaliated with a reign of terror where people were whipped in public, bombed, incarcerated, forced to crawl, starved, beaten, caged and even executed.

“The massacre on 13 April was part of a policy of oppression unleashed by O’Dwyer against the frequent ‘hartals’ (strikes) or the ‘Satyagraha Movement’ (launched by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)… in fact, the civil administration of Punjab had already declared Amritsar a war zone (around April 11) and regarded the residents as their enemies,” Desai points out in the book.

Dyer, who had arrived in Amritsar from Jullundur on the evening of April 11, had ordered his troops to fire on the gathering inside Jallianwala Bagh on the evening of April 13, 1919. The official death figure was put at 379 while nearly 1,200 were injured. The death toll is often disputed, with claims (Indian National Congress Report) that over 1,000 innocent people were killed.

“Not a very well-known entity” when he arrived in Amritsar, Dyer had a “fairly humdrum career” till he “hit immortality as a mass murderer”, the new book says.

(Jaideep Sarin can be reached at [email protected])

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