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Google, AMA to invite solutions for integrated health model

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Washington, April 10 (IANS) Google has joined hands with the American Medical Association (AMA) to invite new solutions of mobile health technology, through devices and applications, that can help effectively monitor patients as well as share medical health data to manage chronic conditions.

AMA’s “The Health Care Interoperability and Innovation Challenge” seeks to evolve available health data to depict a complete picture of a patient’s journey from wellness to illness to treatment and beyond that allows health care delivery to fully focus on patient function, state, outcomes, and goals.

It looks for solutions that demonstrate how data related to remote patient monitoring of conditions is captured on a mobile device, and how it is transferred to and from a clinicians’ practice for incorporation into a physician’s practice workflow.

“The AMA is working to unleash a new era of patient care through its Integrated Health Model Initiative (IHMI) by pioneering a common data model for organising and sharing meaningful health data like patient goal, state, and functioning, and assembling an unprecedented collaborative effort across health care and technology stakeholders,” AMA President David O. Barbe, said in a statement on Monday.

The Challenge requires the development of a supporting patient-physician interaction model that optimises physician time and patient outcomes.

The solutions should include how to import or transfer patient-generated data from a mobile device or a mobile application into one or more phases of the physician or payer health data management cycles.

The winner will be selected to share $25,000 in credits for Google Cloud, followed by the $15,000 and $10,000 for the second and third prize, respectively. All Qualified Entries receive $3,000 in Google Cloud credits.

The Challenge is open only to individuals and teams who are Startup Entities (individuals or teams who are 18 years of age or older and have received less than $5 million in funding and have earned less than $5,00,000 in annual revenue as of the date of entry).

IANS

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Can mangoes make you fat?

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New Delhi, April 25: Summers are the bearer of the sweet aroma of memories of vacations, lazy afternoons and mangoes. This fruit is loved by all young or old but lately it has been infamous for its sugar content and is considered as a cause of weight gain so can mangoes really make us fat?

Saumya Shatakshi, Senior Nutritionist, Healthians, suggests the pros of eating mangoes and what to keep in mind:

* Mango is not just pure indulgence but a powerhouse to various nutrients like it has vitamin A, iron, copper and potassium.

* Mango is an energy food and provides sugar rush to the body which helps boost the energy levels of the body and keeps you active throughout the day.

* It is a storehouse to Vitamin C that increases the immunity and it is also rich in dietary fibre content

* Eating too much of mangoes can be harmful for health so maintaining the portion control is the key

* A medium-sized mango has nearly 150 calories, eating anything beyond the permissible calorie limits results in weight gain. Hence, it is advised not to overeat.

* Eating mangoes after meals increases the overall calories intake.

* We should replace our mid-morning or evening snacks with mangoes. It helps one enjoy the king of fruits without worrying about piling calories.

* Avoid having mangoes at night. It is preferable to have it during the first half of the day.

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Celebrity nutritionist and dietician Nmami Agarwal suggests:

* The number of calories that food carries tells you how much energy it provides. Excess calories are stored as fat, which is why over eating leads to weight gain.

* Mangoes are inversely high on sugar, which generally is an enemy. This is because it causes insulin spikes and falls, which can leave you hungry and cause you to overeat.

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6 herbs to include in your daily diet for a healthier, happier you

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New Delhi, April 23: Focusing on health in the hectic and stressful lives that we lead today is becoming difficult. Incorporating relevant herbs in your daily diet is the first step towards a healthier you.

Ayurveda texts and modern research say that herbs contain compounds that have beneficial health properties that can help prevent many lifestyle disorders and rejuvenate our bodies.

Dr Shruthi M. Hegde, Ayurveda Expert, The Himalaya Drug Company, suggests incorporating the following herbs in your daily diet to practice preventive wellness and take a concrete step towards maintaining good health.

Tulsi: Popularly known as “The Queen of Herbs”, it yields beneficial results for respiratory wellness. It has compounds which are known to have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and expectorant properties. Tulsi helps modulate healthy immune response and supports early recovery from respiratory conditions. Use it to get relief from a cough and cold, especially during seasonal changes, when your body is particularly prone to such respiratory ailments.

Ashvagandha: This herb contains rejuvenating properties, and being an adaptogen, helps cope with stress, reduces harmful effects of long-term stress on the body, and promotes healthy sleep. This makes it particularly useful in our stressful lives, where good work-life balance is often difficult to maintain.

Triphala: It’s difficult to always consume healthy and hygienically prepared food in our hectic lifestyle, making digestive issues a common problem. Triphala helps promote overall digestive wellness in a number of ways. It acts as an effective colon cleanser, regularises normal bowel movements, and aids healthy digestion.

Neem: This helps fight acne by inhibiting the bacteria that causes acne growth. The herb helps promote skin wellness, which becomes even more important during summer, when the skin is more prone to acne breakouts and inflammation. It helps rejuvenate your skin, and prevents the recurrence of acne and blemishes.

Haridra: This herb contains beneficial inflammation-relieving properties. It boosts cell health through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, helping improve overall health. This makes it a potent tool in your preventive wellness toolkit, helping you overcome a number of health problems before they even have a chance to make an appearance

Guduchi: This herb supports the immune system and helps fight against infections by increasing the effectiveness of disease-fighting white blood cells. Including this herb in your daily diet will help increase your body’s resistance to stress and illness.

Make a commitment to getting healthier and staying fit by including these health-boosting herbs in your daily diet. Regular usage of these herbs in addition to other activities such as exercising and consuming a balanced diet will lead to a healthier, happier you.

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Heart patients who walk faster hospitalised less

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London, April 22 (IANS) Increasing the pace of walking may bring some added benefits as researchers have found that faster walking patients with heart disease are hospitalised less.

“The faster the walking speed, the lower the risk of hospitalisation and the shorter the length of hospital stay,” said study author Carlotta Merlo, a researcher at the University of Ferrara in Italy.

“Since reduced walking speed is a marker of limited mobility, which has been linked to decreased physical activity, we assume that fast walkers in the study are also fast walkers in real life,” she added.

The study was conducted in 1,078 hypertensive patients, of whom 85 per cent also had coronary heart disease and 15 per cent also had valve disease.

A total of 359 patients were identified as slow walkers, 362 intermediate and 357 fast walkers.

The researchers recorded the number of all-cause hospitalisations and length of stay of the participants over the next three years.

During the three year period, 182 of the slow walkers (51 per cent) had at least one hospitalisation, compared to 160 (44 per cent) of the intermediate walkers, and 110 (31 per cent) of the fast walkers, according to the study published in the European Jo

urnal of Preventive Cardiology.

The slow, intermediate and fast walking groups spent a total of 4,186, 2,240, and 990 days in hospital over the three years, respectively.

The average length of hospital stay for each patient was 23, 14, and 9 days for the slow, intermediate and fast walkers, respectively.

Each 1 km/hour increase in walking speed resulted in a 19 per cent reduction in the likelihood of being hospitalised during the three-year period.

Compared to the slow walkers, fast walkers had a 37 per cent lower likelihood of hospitalisation in three years, the findings showed.

“Walking is the most popular type of exercise in adults. It is free, does not require special training, and can be done almost anywhere. Even short, but regular, walks have substantial health benefits. Our study shows that the benefits are even greater when the pace of walking is increased,” Merlo said.

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