Global dementia cases may triple to 150 million by 2050: Study

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New York : Dementia cases are expected to rise by over 150 million by 2050, which is about three times more than in 2019, suggests a new study.

The study, published in The Lancet Public Health journal, indicated that the number of people with dementia would increase from 57.4 million cases globally in 2019 to 152.8 million cases in 2050.

“We estimated that there were more women with dementia than men with dementia globally in 2019 and we expect this pattern to continue to 2050,” according to the study.

Globally, the number of people affected by dementia was estimated to have increased by 117 per cent between 1990 and 2016, largely due to population aging.

Demographic analyses suggest that these patterns are driven by decreases in fertility coupled with increases in life expectancy, which together lead to large changes in the age structure of the population.

These changes, along with largely stable age-specific prevalence estimates and population growth, lead to large increases in the number of people affected by dementia.

Given that these demographic trends are expected to continue into the future, the number of people with dementia will continue to rise, the study said.

Additionally, evidence has emerged supporting the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for dementia.

The 2020 update to the Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, intervention and care highlighted the evidence for 12 modifiable risk factors for dementia — low education, hypertension, hearing impairment, smoking, midlife obesity, depression, physical inactivity, diabetes, social isolation, excessive alcohol consumption, head injury and air pollution.

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