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Ebola death toll rises to 200 in Congo

The DRC authorities declared the outbreak in North Kivu province on August 1. It was also reported in the northern province of Ituri.

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Ebola Infection

Kinshasa, Oct 21 : The death toll in the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has risen to 200, the Health Ministry has said.

According to statistics released by the Ministry on Saturday, of the 200 cases confirmed in Beni and surrounding areas, 117 have died of the virus while 61 others recovered after treatment, Xinhua news agency reported.

The DRC authorities declared the outbreak in North Kivu province on August 1. It was also reported in the northern province of Ituri.

The World Health Organization said the 10th Ebola outbreak in DRC does not currently constitute a public health emergency of international concern.

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Orange juice, leafy greens may preserve memory in older men

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New York, Nov 22: Men who eat leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables, berries and drink orange juice may be at a lower risk of developing memory loss in older age, according to a study

The findings showed that men who ate larger amounts of fruits and vegetables 20 years earlier were less likely to develop thinking and memory problems, whether or not they kept eating larger amounts of fruits and vegetables later.

Men who consumed the most vegetables were 34 per cent less likely to develop poor thinking skills than the men who consumed the least amount of vegetables.

Men who drank orange juice every day were 47 per cent less likely to develop poor thinking skills than the men who drank less than one serving per month. This association was mainly observed for regular consumption of orange juice among the oldest men, the researchers found.

“One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to research and track such a large group of men over a 20-year period of time, allowing for very telling results,” said Changzheng Yuan from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

“Our studies provide further evidence dietary choices can be important to maintain your brain health,” Yuan added.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, looked at 27,842 men with an average age of 51 who were all health professionals.

Participants also took subjective tests of their thinking and memory skills at least four years before the end of the study, when they were an average age of 73.

A total of 55 per cent of the participants had good thinking and memory skills, 38 per cent had moderate skills, and seven per cent had poor thinking and memory skills.

However, the study does not show that eating fruits and vegetables and drinking orange juice reduces memory loss; it only shows a relationship between them, the researchers noted.

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Bullying, violence at workplace linked to heart disease, strokes

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London, Nov 22: People who are bullied or experience violence at work are at higher risk of developing heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to a new study.

The findings revealed that those who were bullied almost every day had 120 per cent higher risk of CVD.

Exposure to frequent workplace violence increased the risk of cerebrovascular disease such as stroke by 36 per cent.

“If there is a causal link between bullying or violence at work and cardiovascular disease, then the removal of workplace bullying would mean we could avoid five per cent of all cardiovascular cases, and the eradication of violence at work would avoid more than three per cent of all cases” said Tianwei Xu, a postdoctoral student from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

“Workplace bullying and workplace violence are distinct social stressors at work. Only 10 to 14 per cent of those exposed to at least one type of exposure were suffering from the other at the same time,” Xu said.

For the study, published in the European Heart Journal, the team examined 79,201 working men and women, aged 18 to 65, with no history of CVD.

They found that bullying at workplace occurred mostly from colleagues (79 per cent) rather than from people outside the organisation (21 per cent).

However, violence or threats of violence at work originated mainly from people outside the organisation (91 per cent), than from within (9 per cent).

The study is observational and, therefore, cannot show that workplace bullying or violence cause cardiovascular problems, only that there is an association. The researchers noted their results are robust and have important implications for employers and national governments.

“It is important to prevent workplace bullying and workplace violence from happening, as they constitute major stressors for those exposed and have policies for intervening if bullying or violence occurs,” they said.

IANS

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Intellectual disability is linked to air pollution: Researchers

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London, Nov 22: A team of researchers has linked intellectual disabilities among children to rising air pollution, stressing that exposure outdoor may impede cognitive development.

According to the study funded by Public Health England and published in the Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, British children with intellectual disabilities are more likely than their peers to live in areas with high outdoor air pollution.

The team reached the conclusion from an analysis of data extracted from the UK’s Millennium Cohort Study, a nationally representative sample of more than 18,000 UK children born in 2000 to 2002.

“We know that people with intellectual disabilities in the UK have poorer health and die earlier than they should.

“This research adds another piece to the jigsaw of understanding why that is the case and what needs to be done about it,” said lead author and doctor Eric Emerson from The University of Sydney.

Averaging across ages, children with intellectual disabilities were 33 per cent more likely to live in areas with high levels of diesel particulate matter and 30 per cent more likely to live in areas with high levels of nitrogen dioxide.

“These children were 30 per cent more likely to live in areas with high levels of carbon monoxide and 17 per cent more likely to live in areas with high levels of sulphur dioxide,” the findings showed.

The authors noted that intellectual disability is more common among children living in more socio-economically deprived areas, which tend to have higher levels of air pollution.

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