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Breast-feeding tips for new Moms

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Breastfeeding

New Delhi, Aug 7: Considered an elixir for your baby, breast milk and breast-feeding play a key role in your child’s development. Over the years, the health benefits of breast-feeding have been emphasised to create awareness about the impact of nursing on the overall development of your baby.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breast-feeding for the first six months. However, if we are to go by the statistics, only two out of five women initiate the practice within the first hour of childbirth.

Dr Subhashini N.S., Ayurveda expert, R&D, The Himalaya Drug Company, tells us why breast-feeding is important.

* Breast milk is the best, easiest and the most accessible source of nourishment for baby

* Breast milk helps protect babies from illness such as cold, flu, pneumonia and infections, due to the presence of immunoglobulins and antibodies

* Breast-feeding can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes as well as certain types of breast and ovarian cancer.

Breast milk provides the ideal nutrition for infants. It has a nearly perfect mix of vitamins, protein and fat. And, it is all provided in an easily digestible form. Breast milk contains immunoglobulins and antibodies that help your baby fight viruses and bacteria.

Plus, babies who are breast-fed exclusively for the first six months have fewer ear infections, respiratory illnesses, and bouts of diarrhea.
When breast-feeding, it is important to maintain breast hygiene while your breasts adjust to the new lactating state. A few tips:

* Clean your breasts and nipples properly to avoid any breast-feeding-related infections. It is advisable to simply clean your breasts and apply a nipple care butter infused with kokum butter and virgin coconut oil, which soothe, heal and protect dry, cracked and sore nipples

* To avoid unexpected leaks and stickiness after a feeding session, you can use nursing wipes enriched with coconut oil

* It is recommended that you stay away from synthetic products to clean your nipples, so opt for products with natural ingredients to treat soreness, cracks and for instant hygiene needs.

It is advisable to feed your baby as often as possible, about every two hours or so, as breast milk gets digested quickly. The best way to feed your baby (whether breast or bottle-feeding) is to first choose a calm room, away from any noise or distraction. Make yourself and your baby comfortable on a chair or couch with plenty of cushions around for support.

Breastfeeding is nature’s’way of helping new mothers recover quickly from the trauma of childbirth, supporting her health, and providing the perfect opportunity to bond with the baby. Most mothers find it difficult to breast-feed in public as nursing in public is not common in India. Ensure that you do not breast-feed your baby in an unhygienic environment such as washrooms, especially when you are travelling. This can make you and your baby vulnerable to infections.

Taking cognisance of the fact that mothers need to breast-feed in a healthy and safe environment, Himalaya BabyCare has set up over 120 breast-feeding booths in Kempegowda International Airport and Rajiv Gandhi International Airport, as well as railway and bus stations in Rajasthan.

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India witnesses significant rise in dementia-related cases: Lancet

The results showed that the number of deaths from dementia has increased by 148 per cent over the same 26-year period.

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Moscow, Dec 12 : With number of individuals living with dementia increasing globally owing to ageing population, a Lancet study on Wednesday revealed that India witnessed a significant growth in the number of Alzheimer’s disease and other cases of dementia from 1990 till 2016.

According to the report published in Lancet Neurology journal, India witnessed nearly 2.9 million cases of Alzheimer’s disease and other cases of dementia in the 26-year period and nearly 1.4 lakh deaths arising from the problem.

The results showed that the number of people suffering from Alzheimer’s and other dementia increased from 20.2 million in 1990 to 43.8 million globally in 2016.

Of these, 27 million were women and 16.8 million were men.

To reach this conclusion, an international group of collaborating scientists, including HSE Professor Vasily Vlasov, analysed data from 195 countries on the spread of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia between 1990 and 2016.

The results showed that the number of deaths from dementia has increased by 148 per cent over the same 26-year period.

Dementia is now the fifth most common cause of death worldwide and the second most common — after coronary heart disease — among people aged 70 or older, said the report.

Vlasov noted that according to the data, more than 1 million Russians — most over 50 — were suffering from dementia in 2016.

Researchers have linked high BMI, smoking (including all smoked tobacco products), and diet high in sugar-sweetened beverages as risk factors for dementia.

Although differences in coding for causes of death and the heterogeneity in case-ascertainment methods constitute major challenges to the estimation of the burden of dementia, future analyses should improve on the methods for the correction of these biases, said the study.

“Until breakthroughs are made in prevention or curative treatment, dementia will constitute an increasing challenge to health-care systems worldwide,” it added.

There is growing evidence of risk factors for dementia, which shows that lifestyle and other interventions might, if implemented effectively, contribute to delaying the onset and reducing the future number of people who have dementia.

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Late childbirth linked to high breast cancer risk

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New York, Dec 11: Women who had their first child after 35 may be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer than their peers who do not have children, according to a study contrary to conventional wisdom that childbirth is protective against breast cancer.

Besides late childbirth, women who had a family history of breast cancer or who had a greater number of births also had an increased risk for breast cancer after childbirth. The pattern looked the same whether or not women breastfed.

While the risk was higher for women who were older at first birth, there was no increased risk of breast cancer after a recent birth for women who had their first child before 25, said researchers from the University of North Carolina (UNC) in the US.

“This is evidence of the fact that just as breast cancer risk factors for young women can differ from risk factors in older women, there are different types of breast cancer, and the risk factors for developing one type versus another can differ,” said Hazel B. Nichols, Professor at the UNC.

Although childbirth is still protective against breast cancer, researchers say it can take more than two decades for benefits to emerge.

Breast cancer is more common in older women, with the median age of 62 at diagnosis. But, the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, identified elevated breast cancer risk after childbirth in women younger than 55.

In women 55 years and younger, breast cancer risk peaked about five years after they gave birth, with risk for mothers 80 per cent higher compared with women who did not gave birth.

Twenty-three years after giving birth, women saw their risk level off, and pregnancy started to become protective.

For their analysis, the team pooled data from 15 prospective studies from around the globe that included 889,944 women. In addition to looking at breast cancer risk after childbirth, they also evaluated the impact of other factors such as breastfeeding and a family history of breast cancer.

The findings could be used to develop better breast cancer risk prediction models to help inform screening decisions and prevention strategies, Nichols said.

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Fish oil reduces bleeding risk in surgery patients: Study

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New York, Dec 5: Fish oil, containing the omega-3s, lowers the risk of bleeding during surgery, say, researchers, challenging current recommendations to stop fish oil.

Fish oil is among the most common natural supplement for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia or prevention of cardiovascular disease.

However, concerns about theoretical bleeding risk have led to recommendations that patients should stop taking fish oil before surgery or delay in elective procedures for patients taking fish oil by some healthcare professionals.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, found that higher blood omega-3 levels — eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — were associated with lower risk of bleeding.

For the study, 1,516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomised to omega-3s or placebo.

The dose was 6.5-8 grams of EPA+DHA over two-five days before surgery, and then 1.7 grams per day beginning the morning of surgery and continuing until discharge.

The findings showed that there was a significant reduction in the number of units of blood needed for transfusions.

In another analysis, the higher the blood EPA+DHA level on the morning of surgery, the lower the risk for bleeding, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria.

“The researchers in this study concluded that these findings support the need to reconsider current recommendations to stop fish oil or delay procedures for people on fish oil before cardiac surgery,” said Bill Harris, Founder of OmegaQuant.

While Omega-3s, specifically EPA and DHA, are important for heart, brain, eye and joint health, most people do not get enough of these valuable fatty acids, which can increase their risk of the most serious health issues.

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