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Belligerent Man In A Trump Hat Was Kicked Off A Flight As A Crowd Chanted: ‘Lock Him Up!’

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Out-of-control man in red Trump hat filmed being kicked off United Airlines flight in Shanghai

Like some bizarre parody of a Trump rally, a belligerent man in a “Make America Great Again” hat was booted off a plane in Shanghai Sunday – defiantly waving as a crowd of passengers jeered in the terminal: “Lock him up! Lock him up!”

It’s unclear whether Chinese police did jail the man or who he was. As others on the United Airlines flight described it, he started arguing before he stepped onto the plane.

“Obviously, the hat provoked some of the stuff,” said Alexis Zimmerman, who was flying back to Newark from a business trip.

The man took an aisle seat three rows in front of her. She said he refused to let anyone sit beside him.

“He wanted to sit in the whole row by himself,” Zimmerman said.

Her video shows him leaning back in his seat – hands folded behind his red hat, feet propped on someone else’s arm rest – while a woman in crutches and many others stand in the aisle, snap photos and glare.

“This young lady’s not going to make it to her classes tomorrow and her tests she has to take, thanks to you,” a woman told the man. “Are you proud of yourself?”

“Guess what,” he replied. “In 45 minutes I’m going to collapse for not drinking my soda.”

The man said he was a diabetic, Zimmerman said. But at one point, passengers said, he also dared the flight crew to cuff him and drag him off the plane – reminding other passengers of last month’s infamous deplaning, amid a barrage of in-plane horror stories that have plagued United and the rest of the airline industry in recent years.

But the United crew in Shanghai remained polite and patient throughout Sunday’s ordeal, said Clark Gredoña, another passenger.

“He was trying to explain to the crew and captain . . . because he had points, he felt he deserved an upgrade,” he said. “So this was his way of getting it.”

But he got no upgrade. And before long, as seen in video, the man was waving his arms and shouting: “I have a seat here! . . . Shut up! . . . Moron!”

This went on for the better part of an hour, passengers Gredoña and Zimmerman said. And somehow in all of it, U.S. politics came up.

“I know people don’t like my hat,” Zimmerman heard the man say.

“He berated a female passenger,” Gredoña said. “I think he called her Hillary. Then he called her a lesbian. I think he called a stewardess ‘sweetheart.’ ”
The man became “increasingly disruptive when asked to deplane,” a United spokesman said in a brief statement. “Local law enforcement was called to assist.”

Police had no more luck persuading him than anyone else. So Zimmerman, Gredoña and every other passenger had to return to the terminal and wait for the officers to remove him from the plane.

Zimmerman said that took another two hours. Gredoña, who was partway home from a trip to the Philippines, had by then lost track of time.

He only knows a lot of it passed before the man finally emerged from the plane, escorted by police.

That’s when the whole incident took on a very electoral vibe. Cellphone video shows the man, still in his Trump hat, ascending an escalator – waving what appears to be a seat cushion at dozens of angry onlookers.

Gredoña thinks the chanting started after the man taunted the crowd: “So I succeeded in making you guys waste three-and-a-half hours.”

People then shouted words unprintable.

And one shouted: “Lock him up!”

Then another, and another. “Lock him up, lock him up” – until a Chinese airport terminal sounded much like a latter-day Trump rally, when he and his crowds threatened his presidential campaign opponent, Hillary Clinton, with prison.

“I was one of those chanters,” Zimmerman said. “I didn’t start it. But oh my God, it was so funny, I couldn’t help myself.”

The man remained defiant until the end – jeered in multiple languages, surrounded by police, he finally walked down the concourse and out of sight to an unknown fate.

The plane would take off for the United States that evening, stopping for another delay in San Francisco so new crew could board, but eventually making it to Newark.

In the long and uneventful hours of the journey, passengers wondered who the man was – if he’d ended up in a Chinese jail, or if he’d been trying to provoke something with his political hat and escalating insults.

America

US confirmed COVID-19 cases top 70,000, toll crosses 1,000

The state of New York has become the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the country, with 37,258 cases reported.

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Coronavirus News

New York, March 27 : The number of COVID-19 cases in the US topped 70,000 as of 1.45 p.m., US Eastern Time on Thursday, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University.

The fresh figure reached 75,233 with 1,070 deaths, the CSSE said, Xinhua reported.

The state of New York has become the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the country, with 37,258 cases reported. New Jersey and California have reported 4,407 and 3,247 cases, respectively, according to the center.

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Indian-American Amrit Singh becomes first turban-wearing Deputy Constable in Harris County in US state of Texas

In 2015, Harris County made national headlines after sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal fought for and won the rights to wear his turban and beard on duty.

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Sikh Man

Houston, Jan 22 : Amrit Singh, an Indian-American law enforcement officer, has scripted history by becoming the first-ever turban-wearing Sikh to be sworn in as Deputy Constable in Harris County in the US state of Texas.

Singh, 21, will be the first in his profession to wear his articles of faith – a turban, beard, and uncut hair in the line of duty.

It was a historic day on Tuesday as Singh’s swearing-in coincided with the adoption of a new policy that allows law enforcement officers in nearly every single Harris County Constable’s Office to wear articles of their faith while in uniform. For Sikhs, that means being able to wear a turban and beard while on duty.

Singh always wanted to work as a peace officer. He spent years in law enforcement explorer programmes and five months in a police training academy.

“Growing up, I always wanted to be a deputy and my Sikh faith was also very important to me,” Singh said.

“Constable Alan Rosen was the first one to give me a callback. He opened this agency with open arms for me,” he said.

Speaking at Singh’s swearing-in ceremony, Precinct 1 Constable Rosen said the county’s eight constables supported accommodations for Sikhs to serve while adhering to their religion.

“As a man of the Jewish faith, I know how it feels to be religiously targeted and how important it is to teach inclusion, understanding and tolerance,” Rosen said, standing in front of representatives from the county’s other constable offices.

“To me, wearing a yarmulke or him wearing a turban really doesn’t impact the quality of work he’s going to do. It should have zero impact on public safety or what job we do. Are you going to care if the person showing up to your door to help save you has a turban or yarmulke? You’re not. You’re just happy they’re there to save you and keep you safe,” the officer said.

Singh will now go on to months of field training, after which he will be assigned to patrol within Precinct One.

In 2015, Harris County made national headlines after sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal fought for and won the rights to wear his turban and beard on duty.

At the time of the deputy’s murder last year, just a few dozen law enforcement agencies across the United States — and the US Army — had uniform policies with religious accommodations allowing Sikhs to serve in accordance with their faith.

“Legacy of Dhaliwal is not far removed, it clearly recognised and acknowledge his service and this is a gift that continues to give in his recognition and legacy,” said Bobby Singh, a Sikh community leader.

In 2009, Dhaliwal was the first Sikh to join the Harris County Sheriff’s Office and in 2015, he became the first Sikh law enforcement officer to be allowed to wear his articles of faith in uniform. He was shot and killed during a traffic stop last year.

“We honour his legacy by honouring his faith here today,” Rosen said.

In the months since Dhaliwal’s death, law enforcement agencies in California, Washington and in Texas have signalled willingness to change their policies, said Manpreet Singh of the Sikh Coalition, which advocates for religious accommodations for minority communities in public and private sectors.

“It makes me proud to be a Houstonian, and a Texan. I hope the rest of the nation follows Texas,” she said.

“I could just hope that I could be half as decent a cop as he ever was, and everything I do, I want people to know that I’m doing it following in his footsteps,” Deputy Singh said.

“He made our community proud,” said Suhel Singh, Deputy Singh’s father.

Singh’s parents were recognised at the ceremony. They told FOX 26 that they were proud to see their son pursue his passion even though it is a dangerous job.

“The way I look at it, maybe it will make me pray harder and be more praying for his protection from God,” said Singh’s mother Sukie Kaur.

Singh is now one of just two law enforcement officers in the county wearing a turban.

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Republican ‘disturbed’ over party’s stance in Trump impeachment

Murkowski also said there should be distance between the White House and the Senate over how the trial is conducted.

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Donald Trump

Washington, Dec 26 : Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski has said that she was “disturbed” by her party’s stance before President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, it was reported on Thursday.

The Alaska Senator’s comments come after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellpledged “total co-ordination” with the White House, the BBC said in a report.

Murkowski told Alaska’s KTUU news channel on Wednesday that she was uncomfortable with McConnell’s comments about “total co-ordination”.

“When I heard that I was disturbed,” she said.

Murkowski also said there should be distance between the White House and the Senate over how the trial is conducted.

“To me it means that we have to take that step back from being hand in glove with the defence,” the BBC quoted her as saying to KTUU channel.

She further said that the impeachment proceedings were “rushed”.

Murkowski, a moderate Republican, has criticised President Trump on a number of policy issues.

In October 2018, she opted not to vote to confirm Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, after sexual assault allegations.

On December 18, Trump was impeached by the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

He now faces a trial in the Republican-dominated Senate, whose members are supposed to remain impartial.

The trial could begin next month, after the holiday break.

However, Trump, the third President in US history to be impeached, was unlikely to be removed from office because of the Republican control of the Senate.

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