Belarus President wins Sixth term, Opposition alleges vote-rigging

Russian President Putin

Soon after the Presidential election was held in Belarus on Sunday. several Belarusian cities saw unauthorized protests. In Minsk, protesters returned and the police used tear gas and flash grenades to disperse the demonstrations.

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko is being predicted to have won sixth reelection, according to official preliminary results released Monday, with 80 percent of the votes but the outcome been widely disputed amid accusations of vote-rigging.But the clear picture of the results willl be out on Friday.

President of the European Council Charles Michel on Monday urged the Belarusian authorities to respect civil rights and freedoms.”Violence against protesters is not the answer #Belarus Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, basic human rights must be upheld,” Michel wrote on Twitter.

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko accused Russia, Ukraine and Poland for orchestrating protests in Belarus that emerged soon after the election.

According to preliminary results revealed by the Belarusian Central Election Commission, Lukashenko secured 80.23 percent of votes, followed by opposition candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya with 9.90 percent.

Lukashenko also blamed foreign interference for the Internet shut-off.

Sergey Lebedev, the head of the observers mission from the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) to the presidential election in Belarus, said on Monday that the vote had been conducted in an open, lawful and competitive manner.

The preliminary results of the Belarusian presidential election, held this past Sunday, suggest incumbent president Alexander Lukashenko won over 80 percent of the vote.

“The August 9 election was conducted in compliance with the constitution and electoral code of Belarus. It was open and competitive and ensured that Belarus citizens could freely express their will,” Lebedev said at a briefing.

Candidates, too, had the opportunity to “freely promote their campaigns and speak on the national television,” according to Lebedev.

The team of CIS observers has concluded that both the preparation and process of the election was overall conducted “decently,” as quoted by the mission’s chief.

At the same time, Lebedev pointed out that the vote stood out from Belarus’ previous campaigns by its “political heat.”

“Unfortunately, the vote featured — and we have mentioned it in our statement — statements which were obviously incorrect, provocative and conducive to the escalation of political heat and tension among the public,” the CIS chief observer said.

Lebedev said the detection of inconsistencies in the electoral procedures was a “scattered” occurrence, both for domestic Belarusian observers and CIS observers, whereas in the latter case he said the staff at the polling stations reacted to all voiced critical comments “positively” and promptly corrected any detected inconsistencies.

Meanwhile, the European Union is considering sanctions against Minsk.

Denying any role in Belarus ahead of the presidential election, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov had said that Russia did not send people to Belarus to destabilize the situation there.

“Belarus and Russia are the Union State. It is an ally, the closest partner. Therefore, this is surely out of the question,” Peskov has told.

He said that Moscow is aware of 33 Russian citizens being detained in Belarus and 200 others are still wanted.

“There is no information about any illegal actions of them that could become a reason for the detention,” he said, adding he looks forward to clarification of the incident.

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