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Autumn watching across 5 stunning places around the world

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7 LUXURY TRAVEL TRENDS FOR 2017

Beautiful golden-brown leaves, a brisk breeze, amazing vistas; autumn is one of the most spectacular seasons possible, though it isn’t a sight that we get to see staying in India. That’s why, for your next vacation, check out these top 5 destinations that will give you a front-row seat for the breathtaking show called nature.

Kyoto, Japan

While it’s extremely famous for the elusive cherry blossom season, the autumn season is an equally spectacular sight in Kyoto, especially with the profusion of maple leaves. That being said, there are innumerable other sights that make this unique city worth visiting. Here you can explore the numerous classical Buddhist temples, gardens, imperial palaces, Shinto shrines and the charming traditional wooden houses.

Loire Valley, France

While the Loire Valley showcases the best of French splendour, style and gastronomy, there’s also no better place to experience true autumn, with its smooth, rolling vineyards and beautiful forests and especially if you happen to go during harvest time. This is also the perfect time to sit back and relax with the best of wines, after the grapes are harvested.

Bavaria, Germany

While excellent for skiing, the Alps are also known for the dense forests that pop with colour against snow-dusted mountains, making this the perfect place for some super-fun leaf-watching. After that, you can go on a drive along the Franconia wine region—where local wine festivals punctuate the autumn calendar—heading through centuries-old towns such as medieval Rothenburg ob der Tauber and Dinkelsbühl, learn more about Bavaria’s state-of-the-art motor industry, indulge in some amazing local cuisine, immerse yourself in its poignant history, or simply explore the amazing city.

Aspen, Colorado

With its gorgeous golden-brown aspen trees, Aspen is one of the most popular destinations in the fall season, mainly due to the amazing scenic beauty. While there’s so much more you can do here, from cross-country skiing, hot-air ballooning, hiking, biking, rock-climbing and fishing to horseback riding and paragliding, the autumn beauty it’s still its biggest draw.

Lombardy, Italy

Lombardy is one of the best destinations for an autumn vacation as it’s relatively mild and an ideal place to see the mainland burst into colour. Stretching from the Alps to the valleys, it boasts of breathtaking views and gorgeous mountains, all of them covered with the native poplars that turn a brilliant yellow in the autumn. It’s also a great place to explore medieval towns, peaceful lakes, amazing architecture, beautiful churches and so much more.

“Autumn is one of the most beautiful seasons out there, and the best time to make some fun travel plans,” says Viren Batra, co-founder of Nirvana Travel. “While there are so many more destinations that would make for some amazing leaf-watching, these places are definitely some of the very best.”

 

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Navaratri, other systems of dieting; but Persian maxim trumps them

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Navratri snacking

Corona has taken a toll of my discourses on elementary Hindu rituals, like Navratra, because my yoga guru from the Monghyr Ashram has placed himself under severe restrictions. Last year, between asanas, he was able to slip in the odd recipe centered around tapioca, water chestnut, without grain, meat and the amber stuff.

My man Friday, a Hindu of insufficient Hindutva, a gourmet cook of non-vegetarian delectations, is almost thrilled to forego his dietary excesses during Navaratri. What comes into play is his innate ‘aastha’ or faith: scratch any skin, and it is there.

Two categories of Indians, of any faith, tend to have a link with religion which over the years has become tenuous: those exposed to western education continuously for two generations or those who grew up in a ‘progressive’ household. The ‘progressives’ in my environment represented a confluence of two streams. Their anti-feudal, anti-imperial stance had certain Marxist antecedents. Otherwise, they derived from the Urdu poets of the 18th and 19th centuries with their innate abhorrence of religious orthodoxy, a caricature of the Mullah, an elegant irreverence towards traditionalism, committed to social justice — a modern outlook, way ahead of self-proclaimed liberals reared on John Stuart Mill.

In modern times, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Krishen Chander, Rajender Singh Bedi, Ali Sardar Jafri, Ismet Chugtai, Kaifi Azmi, Munish Narain Saxena, and Niaz Haidar have followed the tradition.

Multiple social malaise continued to haunt Muslims in the grip of the clergy to whom they had been subcontracted by the politician. Those being targeted as ‘urban naxals’ are precisely the sources of enlightenment for a community which would otherwise have sunk further into social backwardness.

By way of diversion, social backwardness has triggered an unrelated episode from my travels to the Connemara coast of Ireland where the great cricketer, Ranjit Singhji (Ranji) had bought Ballynahinch castle on a river known for the finest river salmon, a paradise for anglers. W.G. Grace and C.B. Fry stayed with him, but for his sister, he had made expensive arrangements in the nearby convent with some very strict conditions: she would not be converted to Christianity and she would only wear saris.

From childhood, participation in Diwali, Holi and Dussehra for Muslims and Eid, Bakr Eid and Moharram for Hindus was more or less compulsory among families and their circle of friends. Raksha Bandhan too was a beautiful occasion for cross religious participation. What has surprised me is my lack of acquaintance with, say, Navaratri, on which my yoga guru, absent because of Corona, has been my informal instructor. What I suspect has happened is that during my formative years’ observances like Navaratri, Ekadashi, pujas for change of seasons, elements, waxing and waning of the moon were either in a low key or confined to the mofussil who were marginal to Lucknow’s mainstream.

Ramzan, the month of fasting, was noticed by non-Muslims in a sensitive way: invitations for lunches or dinners were suspended. Only the closest of the errant friends made clandestine arrangements to imbibe prohibited beverages. There were eccentrics among the aristocracy in the vicinity of Lucknow who broke their fast with a shot of Scotch. One instance I am aware of where a family protested at the eccentricity of their elder relative. They were roundly rebuffed for standing between the old gentleman and his God.

Ghalib was the biggest advertiser of his mischievous indiscretions during Ramzan. He mentions in his letters how he snatched a bite of ‘roti’ (bread) here and gulped water there. Excuses he makes for not fasting were almost childish:

“Jis pas roza khol ke khane ko kuchh na ho

Roza agar na khaaye to lachaar kya karey?”

(If someone doesn’t have the means for an elaborate ‘Iftar’, or breaking of the fast:

He has only one choice: “swallow” the roza). Swallow here means “end the fast”.

His poor finances and rising costs after 1857 were forbidding. They caused him to write bitterly. “Life in Delhi is becoming impossible; Scotch is selling at Rs 16 per dozen bottles.”

There is a subsidiary group of Hazrat Ali’s admirers, among whom Ghalib counted himself, who fast only for three days of Ramzan, beginning 19th when Ali was struck by a poisoned sword in the mosque at Kufa and Ramzan the 21st when he died.

My grandfather’s fasting companion during these three days was Pundit Brij Mohan Nath Kachar, a regular at our village during Moharram. His sermons attracted full houses.

The speed with which Hindutva has in recent years transformed faith and practice of religion into religious assertion has left me a trifle shaken. Should my 50 years of commitment — films, books, columns on cultural commerce — be put away as a chronicle of wasted time? Or should I dismiss these as cow belt excesses exactly as the authors of the Constitution did.

After 1947, the UP Assembly grappled with a list of 20 alternative names for United Provinces. The matter could not be postponed indefinitely because the drafting of the new Constitution was nearing completion and the state’s new name had to be inserted. The Provincial Congress Committee met in Varanasi in November 1947. A majority of 106 members voted for ‘Aryavarta’ as the state’s new name, 22 members voted for ‘Hind’. Both names were shot down by Nehru.

I had started this column on Navaratri, as nine days of austere dieting. Faith was not an issue at all. Under the guru’s advice, I had been persuaded that it was a healthier way of giving the body a rest than total starvation for 10 to 14 hours which Ghalib found difficult to cope with.

In fact, the best I heard on this theme was from my uncle Syed Mohammad Mehdi. He used to recite a Persian maxim:

“Ba har hafta faaqa

Ba har maah qae

Ba har saal mushil

Ba har roz mai”

(Fast every week;

Drink litres of saline water and

Vomit it out every month;

Purgative every year;

Wine every evening)

(Saeed Naqvi is a senior commentator on political and diplomatic issues. The views expressed are personal. He can be reached on [email protected])

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Thinnest crowd, sans guest: Covid hurts RSS’ biggest event

Like other years, there were no ceremonial band playing or marches. Bhagwat simply offered his floral tribute to Hedgewar, RSS founder and did ‘Shastra puja’.

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Mohan Bhagwat RSS Chief

New Delhi: The foundation day of BJP’s ideological mentor, thee RSS on this Vijaya Dashami has been unique.

The Sangh’s single largest annual event that usually witnesses hundreds and thousands of cadres systematically assembling at the ground to listen to the Sarsanghchalak was missing.

In fact, to Bhagwta’s own admission, this year it was the thinnest crowd ever — apart from the day of its inception.

This time the RSS annual event that takes place on a sprawling ground in Nagpur, took place inside an auditorium where a handful of cadres were seated with adequate physical distancing, given the pandemic situation.

“This is probably the first time in Sangh’s history since its foundation day that a RSS Vijaya Dashami program has been organised with such a restricted low number. We have done this keeping in view the COVID protocol,” Bhagwat said at the outset.

While he paid tributes to the front line workers who lost their lives fighting the virus and urged all to be mindful of the persistent threat, one couldn’t help but notice that there was no Chief Guest this year. It was also done amid the pandemic in a stark departure from tradition.

Each year, some one of prominence is invited to lecture on this biggest annual RSS event. Former President Pranab Mukherjee created a row when he agreed to be the chief guest of this event in 2018. Last year, it was HCL’s Shiv Nadar. Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis, and Union Ministers Nitin Gadkari, Gen V.K. Singh were also among the other guests present at the address. However, 2020 was an odd one out when no one special was invited.

Meanwhile, given it was a small inside arrangement, the stage too was very small in comparison to the mammoth stage that is erected each year on the ground. Only 4 individuals, including Bhagwat were present on stage this time — all wearing a mask.

Only 50 volunteers were allowed inside the Maharshi Vyas auditorium this year. “We are all aware that this Vijayadashami the celebrations are restrained in terms of numbers. We are also aware of the cause. To prevent community spread of Coronavirus social gatherings are restricted,” Bhagwat said.

Like other years, there were no ceremonial band playing or marches. Bhagwat simply offered his floral tribute to Hedgewar, RSS founder and did ‘Shastra puja’.

Though, the event is being beamed live each year, it was the main source of dissemination of the Sangha’s message this year, given no media access was allowed.

The event was beamed live on Youtube, Facebook and Twitter. Above 42,000 viewed it through Youtube while nearly 23,000 saw it on the Twitter account of RSS. In fact, while beginning to address, Bhagwat also mentioned those who were joining online.

This is the Sangh’s biggest annual event where the Sarsanghchalak chalks out the broader agenda for the year to come. This time, Bhagwat spoke extensively on the pandemic, Chinese aggression and how India must counter it as well as push for ‘swadeshi’. He also spoke against pro-CAA protestors.

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Market Watch : FII’s inflows to help market register gains

Shares of Vedanta have gained in the past week post the announcement of the meeting for the interim dividend. They gained Rs 9.80, or 10.32% to close the week at Rs 104.80.

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Sensex Stock Market Update UP and Low

Markets continued to gain ground during the week gone by with gains registered on four of the five trading days. BSESENSEX gained 702.52 points or 1.76% to close at 40,685.50 points while NIFTY gained 167.90 points or 1.43% to close at 11,930.35 points. The broader market saw BSE100, BSE200 and BSE500 gain 1.51%, 1.58% and 1.64% respectively. BSEMIDCAP was up 2.43% while BSESMALLCAP was up 2.56%. The breadth of the market increasing as is apparent from the gains in midcap and Smallcap are the redeeming feature.

Indian rupee lost 28 paisa or 0.38% to close at Rs 73.62 to the US Dollar. Dow Jones was under pressure and lost 270.74 points or 0.95% to close at 28,335.57 points.

In primary market news, the fresh issue of Rs 280 crs and an offer for sale of 7.2 cr shares from Equitas Small Finance Bank Limited, was subscribed 1.95 times. The issue saw QIB portion subscribed 3.91 times, HNI portion undersubscribed at 0.22 times, Retail portion subscribed 2.08 times and Shareholder reservation undersubscribed 0.42 times. The price band of the issue was Rs 32-33.

Vedanta Limited has declared an interim dividend of Rs 9.50 for the current financial year 2020-2021. This is from the dividend which it has received from its subsidiary, Hindustan Zinc Limited of Rs 16.50 per share or Rs 6,972 crs. The dividend received by Vedanta against its holding of 64.92% was Rs 4,526 crs. Vedanta has distributed 77% or Rs 3,500 crs of this amount to shareholders of the company. The dividend by Hindustan Zinc was declared in May 2020. Probably Anil Agarwal was super confident that he would be able to pull of the delisting at the ridiculous price of Rs 87.25 and therefore used the proceeds of the dividend to fund his delisting war chest. Looking at it another way he felt that if he succeeds in delisting, the dividend would not have to be shared with minority shareholders. Failing in the exercise, he has distributed the same as per the company dividend policy after five months.

Incidentally, Hindustan Zinc has announced a second interim dividend of Rs 21.30 per share totalling Rs 9,000 crs on 20th October. Assuming that Vedanta would distribute the similar 77% of the dividend received, this would amount to Rs 12.25 per share. On a simple maths and assuming the price of Vedanta to be Rs 100, the two dividends, one proposed and one expected, total Rs 21.75, a dividend yield of 21.75%. Wonder how many companies if any, can boast of that record. Its high time that promoters stop taking their minority shareholders for a ride.

Incidentally, the government has proposed a strategic sale of Hindustan Copper and with Sterlite’s Tuticorin copper smelter plant shut, this becomes a must acquire proposition for Vedanta. Currently there are just two copper smelters in India and both are owned by state run Hindustan Copper Limited. The others like Birla Copper and Sterlite were importing copper concentrates to make cathodes. Its high time, the Anil Agarwal group mends its way and tries to becoming more investor friendly.

Shares of Vedanta have gained in the past week post the announcement of the meeting for the interim dividend. They gained Rs 9.80, or 10.32% to close the week at Rs 104.80.

The buoyancy in the markets has been helped by FII’s being buyers in the market. On a monthly basis they were net sellers of Rs 11,410 crore in September, which they have more than bought back with net purchases of Rs 13,565 crore in October so far. They had also bought Rs 15,749 crs in August of this year. As long as the inflow is so strong where 2 billion dollars are pumped in a month, it would be fair to say that markets cannot fall. If to this you add the fact that the breadth of the market is increasing you have a setting for the present optimist mood to continue.

On the Covid-19 front, the world saw 4,29,46,446 patients with 11,54,862 deaths and 3,16,73,006 people recovering. In India, the number of patients were 78,64,811 with 1,18,567 deaths and 70,78,123 people recovering. Compared to the previous week, there were 29,86,795 new patients, 40,221 deaths and 17,82,622 people recovering. In India there were 3,70,260 new patients, 4,503 deaths and 4,80,914 people recovering. The number of patients recovering has been consistently more than new patients and the same is a very positive sign. The successful launch of a vaccine is eagerly awaited while some countries have begun mass scale administering of dosages for the same.

The week ahead sees October futures expire on Thursday the 29th of October. The present level of NIFTY is higher by 1,124.80 points or 10.41% for the series. This double-digit gain is huge and quite unnatural. One must of course exclude the fall this year in March2020 when the pandemic broke out and the recovery which followed in April 2020. Expect the bulls to build on the same while the bears would try to claw some of it back. Results so far for the NIFTY pack have been good and are fuelling the rally.

With expiry just four days away, expect markets to be volatile and have larger intraday movement. As long as there is no major negative news flow it would be fair to assume that markets would continue to register gains no matter how much smaller. Positive inflows from FII’s would further help markets to gain ground. Continue using sharp dips to add to positions and rallies to sell.

–IANS

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