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Travel with babies always carry baby stroller, baby clothes

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New Delhi, Aug 30: To make travel, light and comfortable with baby always carry all the essential things like a baby stroller, a nasal aspirator and a breast pump, say experts.

Vijay Goel, spokesperson from U-Grow India and Director of Sunheri Marketing Pvt. Ltd and Rohit Batra, Dermatologist at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital and Dermaworld Skin & Hair Clinic, have listed a few ways to make your life easier:

* Carry baby stroller for relax shopping even if you are busy with something, you can place the baby in the stroller and enjoy the moment.

However make sure that you do not expose your child to direct sunlight or cold weather.

* Do not forget to keep baby products like soft, gentle moisturizing cream & wipes to keep the baby fresh.

Avoid all the harsh soaps which may cause skin allergy, eczema or rashes.

* Use inflatable mattress for cars to ensure baby’s comfort which let your baby sleep without the chances of falling in between the seats.

* The contactless infrared thermometer works on the advanced technology and measures temperature from a distance of 3 to 5 cm. It also keeps a record of the last 30-32 temperatures.

Apart from this, the thermometer can measure temperatures of various surfaces and liquids.

* Always try to maintain hygiene for babies. To avoid bacteria which can cause skin disease, change their clothes frequently. Watch out for symptoms like rashes and red bumps.

* Never ignore baby products like safe leak proof containers. Store baby food and milk powder in them. Go with containers made from food grade polypropylene.

* A nasal aspirator is highly effective to let your baby breathe easily when you are out at the time of weather change.

If the baby is ill, a nasal aspirator is a great product to clear the stuffy nose and congestion.

* Since you may feel uncomfortable in feeding the child openly, breast pumps come handy. Available in manual as well as electric form.

Wefornews Bureau

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India witnesses significant rise in dementia-related cases: Lancet

The results showed that the number of deaths from dementia has increased by 148 per cent over the same 26-year period.

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Moscow, Dec 12 : With number of individuals living with dementia increasing globally owing to ageing population, a Lancet study on Wednesday revealed that India witnessed a significant growth in the number of Alzheimer’s disease and other cases of dementia from 1990 till 2016.

According to the report published in Lancet Neurology journal, India witnessed nearly 2.9 million cases of Alzheimer’s disease and other cases of dementia in the 26-year period and nearly 1.4 lakh deaths arising from the problem.

The results showed that the number of people suffering from Alzheimer’s and other dementia increased from 20.2 million in 1990 to 43.8 million globally in 2016.

Of these, 27 million were women and 16.8 million were men.

To reach this conclusion, an international group of collaborating scientists, including HSE Professor Vasily Vlasov, analysed data from 195 countries on the spread of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia between 1990 and 2016.

The results showed that the number of deaths from dementia has increased by 148 per cent over the same 26-year period.

Dementia is now the fifth most common cause of death worldwide and the second most common — after coronary heart disease — among people aged 70 or older, said the report.

Vlasov noted that according to the data, more than 1 million Russians — most over 50 — were suffering from dementia in 2016.

Researchers have linked high BMI, smoking (including all smoked tobacco products), and diet high in sugar-sweetened beverages as risk factors for dementia.

Although differences in coding for causes of death and the heterogeneity in case-ascertainment methods constitute major challenges to the estimation of the burden of dementia, future analyses should improve on the methods for the correction of these biases, said the study.

“Until breakthroughs are made in prevention or curative treatment, dementia will constitute an increasing challenge to health-care systems worldwide,” it added.

There is growing evidence of risk factors for dementia, which shows that lifestyle and other interventions might, if implemented effectively, contribute to delaying the onset and reducing the future number of people who have dementia.

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Late childbirth linked to high breast cancer risk

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New York, Dec 11: Women who had their first child after 35 may be at an increased risk of developing breast cancer than their peers who do not have children, according to a study contrary to conventional wisdom that childbirth is protective against breast cancer.

Besides late childbirth, women who had a family history of breast cancer or who had a greater number of births also had an increased risk for breast cancer after childbirth. The pattern looked the same whether or not women breastfed.

While the risk was higher for women who were older at first birth, there was no increased risk of breast cancer after a recent birth for women who had their first child before 25, said researchers from the University of North Carolina (UNC) in the US.

“This is evidence of the fact that just as breast cancer risk factors for young women can differ from risk factors in older women, there are different types of breast cancer, and the risk factors for developing one type versus another can differ,” said Hazel B. Nichols, Professor at the UNC.

Although childbirth is still protective against breast cancer, researchers say it can take more than two decades for benefits to emerge.

Breast cancer is more common in older women, with the median age of 62 at diagnosis. But, the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, identified elevated breast cancer risk after childbirth in women younger than 55.

In women 55 years and younger, breast cancer risk peaked about five years after they gave birth, with risk for mothers 80 per cent higher compared with women who did not gave birth.

Twenty-three years after giving birth, women saw their risk level off, and pregnancy started to become protective.

For their analysis, the team pooled data from 15 prospective studies from around the globe that included 889,944 women. In addition to looking at breast cancer risk after childbirth, they also evaluated the impact of other factors such as breastfeeding and a family history of breast cancer.

The findings could be used to develop better breast cancer risk prediction models to help inform screening decisions and prevention strategies, Nichols said.

IANS

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Fish oil reduces bleeding risk in surgery patients: Study

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New York, Dec 5: Fish oil, containing the omega-3s, lowers the risk of bleeding during surgery, say, researchers, challenging current recommendations to stop fish oil.

Fish oil is among the most common natural supplement for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia or prevention of cardiovascular disease.

However, concerns about theoretical bleeding risk have led to recommendations that patients should stop taking fish oil before surgery or delay in elective procedures for patients taking fish oil by some healthcare professionals.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, found that higher blood omega-3 levels — eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — were associated with lower risk of bleeding.

For the study, 1,516 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomised to omega-3s or placebo.

The dose was 6.5-8 grams of EPA+DHA over two-five days before surgery, and then 1.7 grams per day beginning the morning of surgery and continuing until discharge.

The findings showed that there was a significant reduction in the number of units of blood needed for transfusions.

In another analysis, the higher the blood EPA+DHA level on the morning of surgery, the lower the risk for bleeding, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) criteria.

“The researchers in this study concluded that these findings support the need to reconsider current recommendations to stop fish oil or delay procedures for people on fish oil before cardiac surgery,” said Bill Harris, Founder of OmegaQuant.

While Omega-3s, specifically EPA and DHA, are important for heart, brain, eye and joint health, most people do not get enough of these valuable fatty acids, which can increase their risk of the most serious health issues.

IANS

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