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77% of Germans don’t want their leader bowing to Erdogan’s demands – poll

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Tayyip Erdogan Angela Merkel

The majority of Germans want to see Chancellor Angela Merkel take a strong stand against the Turkish president and stop caving in to his demands even if it undermines the EU refugee deal with Ankara, a recent poll has shown.

The survey which found that as many as 77 percent want Merkel to stand up to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was published on Tuesday by Stern-RTL.
The poll also witnessed an 8.5 percent drop in backing for Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union and its Bavarian sister party the Christian Social Union.

The news coincides with Erdogan’s latest threat to suspend the EU migrant deal signed by Turkey if Ankara is not provided with a visa-free travel to Europe.

“If that is not what will happen… no decision and no law in the framework of the readmission agreement will come out of the parliament of the Turkish Republic,” Erdogan said at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul on Tuesday.

Merkel insists that to implement the visa-free travel agreement, Turkey needs to change its anti-terror legislation and to fulfill all 72 requirements mentioned in the refugee deal. Berlin has recently announced that visa-free travel will not be implemented until 2017 due to Ankara’s “controversial anti-terrorism laws.” Ankara, in turn, said it will by no means change its anti-terror laws which it claims are only meant to help tackle the threat posed by Kurdish militants in the southeast of the country, as well as the threats posed by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL).

“Turkey is supposed to fulfill criteria? What criteria are these I ask you?” Erdogan asked at the end of the summit.

Erdogan is using the refugee crisis to “blackmail Europe” and get the visa-free travel, Kani Xulam from American Kurdish Information Network told RT. “If he gets a free-visa travel he will basically export the Kurdish question to Europe, and that I don’t think Europeans are ready for,” he added.

The hasty deal signed between Brussels and Turkey in March stipulated that all refugees and asylum seekers arriving on Greek shores illegally would be sent back to Turkey.

For each Syrian migrant returned, the EU agreed to take in another Syrian who has made a legitimate request. In return, the bloc promised to give Ankara additional funding of some €6 billion ($6.8 billion) and hold enhanced talks on Turkey’s potential EU membership.

According to another poll released by ARD-Deutschlandtrend in April, 56 percent of Germans described the deal as ‘rather bad’, compared to 39 percent rating it ‘rather good’.

While Merkel repeatedly praised the agreement saying it would alleviate the crisis, human rights groups, including the UN Refugee Agency and MSF denounced the “quick-fix” and “short-sighted” refugee deal.

“The ‘EU-Turkey deal’ effectively outsources caring for these people to Turkey in exchange for, among other things, a multibillion euro financial aid package,” Joanne Liu, MSF International President, wrote in an open letter. “This aid is now conditional on shipping suffering offshore, betraying the humanitarian principle of providing aid based on need alone.”

The UN Refugee Agency earlier said the deal was “not consistent with international law” as “collective expulsion of foreigners is prohibited under the European Convention on Human Rights.”

Overall the migrant deal does not look “promising” for the EU and is on the brink of falling apart, believes Xulam.

“If Turkey was truly wanting to join the EU, Turkey would have a democratic country…It would respect the Constitution, the checks and balances. Since Erdogan became president he has basically bypassed the parliament and the prime minister’s office. And now he’s threatening Europe with opening his borders,” he said. “It doesn’t look promising at all.”

Merkel has also fallen under a wave of sharp criticism since she gave the greenlight to the prosecution of a German comedian who recited a poem insulting Erdogan. Critics said that she was compromising freedom of speech so as not to “upset” the Turkish president, who has become a key player in the refugee deal.

“Prosecution of satire due to ‘lese majeste’ does not fit with modern democracy,” Thomas Oppermann, Social Democrats (SPD) leader in parliament, said.

Merkel must now “live with the accusation that the deal with Turkey is more important to her than defending freedom of the press,” said Anton Hofreiter of the opposition Greens.

In March, German comedian Jan Bohmermann recited the poem, in which he stated that the Turkish president had an inclination to zoophilia and enjoyed watching child pornography. In response, Erdogan requested that the German government prosecute the comic. Chancellor Merkel complied with the request.

Source : rt.com

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Japan’s Abe lifts state of emergency

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Tokyo, May 25 (IANS) Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Monday lifted the countrys nationwide state of emergency, ending restrictions in the remaining areas where the order was still in effect due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We had very stringent criteria for lifting the state of emergency. We have judged that we have met this criteria,” the BBC quoted Abe as saying said in a televised address to the nation on Monday.

He said the country had managed to control the spread of COVID-19 since issuing the order in some areas on April 7, then later extending it nationwide.

Japan has been easing restrictions since mid-May, but kept several areas, Tokyo included, under watch to ensure the outbreak had been contained.

Unlike other major economies, Japan has endured a relatively limited outbreak of OVID-19, recording 820 coronavirus-related deaths and 16,550 infections as of Monday.

Initially, Japan was criticised for its handling of the pandemic, prompting the prime minister to declare a state of emergency in metropolitan areas on April 7, later expanding it nationwide.

Monday’s decision came after the number of infections and the situation of the health system in Tokyo, the three neighbouring prefectures of Chiba, Kanagawa and Saitama and the northern Hokkaido, the only ones where the state of emergency remained in effect, reports Efe news.

The group of experts advising the government appreciated the efforts made by citizens to comply with the recommendations to achieve the target of reducing interpersonal contact by 80 per cent, top government spokesperson Yoshihide Suga said at a press conference on Monday.

The recommendation for citizens to avoid unnecessary trips outside and the request for non-essential businesses to close were not mandatory nor accompanied by fines or other penalties for non-compliance, unlike the stricter containment measures implemented in other countries.

The government had already decided to lift the emergency in 39 prefectures on May 14 after they reported a marked decrease in the number of infections, leaving out the more populated regions such as Tokyo and Osaka.

To avoid new outbreaks of the virus, Abe has urged people to become accustomed to a “new lifestyle” that includes maintaining social distancing, the use of masks outside as well as a series of guidelines for the reopening of shops, restaurants and public facilities.

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UK PM aide’s row overshadows plans to ease lockdown

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Boris Johnson

London, May 25 (IANS) Pressure was mounting on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to act over his senior aide Dominic Cummings’ lockdown trip, as the cabinet is slated to met on Monday to discuss plans to ease the country’s COVID-19 restrictions.

Cummingss, the former Vote Leave chief who was the architect of Johnson’s Brexit strategy, is facing calls to resign after it emerged that he travelled from London to his parents’ home in Durham with coronavirus symptoms during the lockdown, reports the BBC.

Speaking at Sunday’s Downing Street briefing, Johnson said he believed Cummings had “no alternative” but to make the journey at the end of March for childcare “when both he and his wife were about to be incapacitated by coronavirus”.

The Prime Minister said he held “extensive” discussions on Sunday with Mr Cummings, who he said “followed the instincts of every father and every parent – and I do not mark him down for that”.

However, the BBC report said that the Prime Minister was finding it difficult to shift the political focus away from his key adviser.

Speaking to the BBC, Acting Lib Dem leader Ed Davey said that the row over Cummings was “preventing the government from getting on and doing its job, and doing it better”.

He said that Johnson should sack Cummings “so the government has more credibility in what it says about public health”.

“The instruction the Prime Minister gave us all to stay at home has been breached by his top adviser and that’s what you can’t get away from in this story, its pretty simple.

“I hope the prime minister will come to his senses, recapture his judgement and reinstall authority on this crisis by acting,” he told the BBC.

Meanwhile, some of the scientists that advise ministers were also concerned that Johnson’s decision to back Cummings would undermine the message on controlling the virus.

Stephen Reicher, a professor of social psychology who has advised the government on behavioural science during the pandemic, told the BBC that trust was vital to maintaining public health measures, adding: “You can’t have trust if people have a sense of them and us, that there’s one rule for them and another rule for us.”

Also responding to the row, Bishop of Leeds, the Right Reverend Nick Baines, said Johnson was treating people “as mugs” and the Bishop of Bristol, the Right Reverend Vivienne Faull, accused the Prime ,inister of having “no respect for people”.

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Seoul kindergarten student tests COVID-19 positive

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Seoul, May 25 (IANS) A kindergarten student in Seoul has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the South Korean capital city’s education office said on Monday.

The development comes just two days ahead of the planned second-phase resumption of South Korean schools, including kindergartens, reports Yonhap News Agency.

The six-year-old student is believed to have contracted the virus from his art teacher at Young Rembrandts, a private art school in Magok .

The teacher, who tested positive on Sunday, had taught 35 students at the institute until Friday and had contact with three other staff members.

The teachers all wore masks and followed the institute’s quarantine guidelines and social distancing rules, according to the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education.

The art school’s 91 students, three teachers and two parents have been tested for the virus and are awaiting their results, which will come out on Tuesday.

The teacher’s 38 contacts have been ordered to self-quarantine for 14 days, and 13 educational institutes in the same building as the art school will be closed for disinfection.

The boy’s kindergarten, 10 nearby kindergartens and five nearby elementary schools will remain closed for two days for disinfection and other precautionary measures, said the Yonhap News Agency report.

Under the government’s phased school reopening plan, schools are scheduled to resume in-person classes for the two lowest grades of elementary school, kindergarten students, middle school seniors and second-year high school students on Wednesday.

High school seniors returned to school last week after more than two months of delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has so far infected 11,206 South Koreans and killed 267 others.

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