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5 natural methods to beat stress

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New Delhi, Sep 15: A study of 200,000 respondents by Optum has found that 46 per cent of the Indian workforce reports suffering from some form of stress.

Stress is the body’s natural response to pressure. It can have a negative effect on your body, mood, as well as behaviour, with wide-ranging effects like headaches, anxiety, fatigue and irritability.

The causes of stress vary from one person to the next, and so do the effects. Stress can be harmful for the body, and is the cause of many health and lifestyle problems. Managing stress should be a priority, but is often difficult to achieve due to lack of time or effective and simple methods to do so.

Dr Hariprasad, Ayurveda Expert at The Himalaya Drug Company, recommends the following natural methods to cope with stress:

Unwind with physical activity: All forms of physical activity are useful in managing stress. Exercising has many benefits such as releasing endorphins and calming the mind, with a reduction in stress levels being an added bonus. Even 45 minutes of physical activity a day goes a long way towards managing stress levels.

Organise your life: Organising one’s workload leads to a sense of control and peace of mind, and there are many ways to achieve this. One way to do this is through adopting good time management, by prioritising tasks, and scheduling time to complete them. Switching between tasks and having them pile up often becomes an additional source of stress. Decentralisation of tasks or asking for help as and when required is also a good way to reduce stress levels.

Use herbs in daily diet: Herbs like Ashvagandha have been proven to be effective in managing the negative effects of stress. According to Ayurveda texts and modern research, Ashvagandha helps reduce the damaging effects of long-term stress by rejuvenating the mind and body. It is an adaptogen that helps the body stabilise physiological processes, maintain a healthy balance between different biological systems, and support better resilience to stress.

Eat the right food: Your eating habits have a significant impact on stress levels. Following a healthy diet with a good balance of different food groups and all the required nutrients is essential. A diet rich in different food groups such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, dairy, fish, and poultry would help you get the carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins and minerals you need. A well-nourished body is better able to cope with the physical and emotional effects of stress.

Get enough sleep: Sleep is essential in stress management. Not getting enough sleep typically leads to irritability and fatigue. Oversleeping can make us sluggish, depressed — and puts our health at a higher risk. Getting the right amount of sleep, between 7-8 hours, is a good way to stay energised and effectively manage the challenges of the day.

In this busy and stressful life, these simple and natural methods can help you manage stress and maintain good mental and physical health.

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Herd immunity an impractical strategy, study finds

They found that using the suppression strategy, far fewer fatalities were predicted: 62,000 among individuals aged 60-plus and 43,000 among individuals under 60.

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Boost immunity

Achieving herd immunity to COVID-19 is an impractical public health strategy, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia scientists. The study recently appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Controlling COVID-19 has presented public health policymakers with a conundrum:

How to prevent overwhelming their health care infrastructure, while avoiding major societal disruption? Debate has revolved around two proposed strategies. One school of thought aims for “suppression,” eliminating transmission in communities through drastic social distancing measures, while another strategy is “mitigation,” aiming to achieve herd immunity by permitting the infection of a sufficiently large proportion of the population while not exceeding health care capacity.

“The herd immunity concept is tantalizing because it spells the end of the threat of COVID-19,” said Toby Brett, a postdoctoral associate at the Odum School of Ecology and the study’s lead author. “However, because this approach aims to avoid disease elimination, it would need a constant adjustment of lockdown measures to ensure enough—but not too many—people are being infected at a particular point in time. Because of these challenges, the herd immunity strategy is actually more like attempting to walk a barely visible tightrope.”

This study carried out by Brett and Pejman Rohani at the University of Georgia’s Center for the Ecology of Infectious Diseases, investigates the suppression and mitigation approaches for controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

While recent studies have explored the impacts of both suppression and mitigation strategies in several countries, Brett and Rohani sought to determine if and how countries could achieve herd immunity without overburdening the health care system, and to define the control efforts that would be required to do so.

Pejman Rohani teaching a class. Credit: Photo taken by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA in 2019
They developed an age-stratified disease transmission model to simulate SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the United Kingdom, with spread controlled by the self-isolation of symptomatic individuals and various levels of social distancing.

Their simulations found that in the absence of any control measures, the U.K. would experience as many as 410,000 deaths related to COVID-19, with 350,000 of those being from individuals aged 60-plus.

They found that using the suppression strategy, far fewer fatalities were predicted: 62,000 among individuals aged 60-plus and 43,000 among individuals under 60.

If self-isolation engagement is high (defined as at least 70% reduction in transmission), suppression can be achieved in two months regardless of social distancing measures, and potentially sooner should school, work and social gathering places close.

When examining strategies that seek to build herd immunity through mitigation, their model found that if social distancing is maintained at a fixed level, hospital capacity would need to greatly increase to prevent the health care system from being overwhelmed. To instead achieve herd immunity given currently available hospital resources, the U.K. would need to adjust levels of social distancing in real time to ensure that the number of sick individuals is equal to, but not beyond, hospital capacity. If the virus spreads too quickly, hospitals will be overwhelmed, but if it spreads too slowly, the epidemic will be suppressed without achieving herd immunity.

Brett and Rohani further noted that much is unknown about the nature, duration and effectiveness of COVID-19 immunity, and that their model assumes perfect long-lasting immunity. They cautioned that if immunity is not perfect, and there is a significant chance of reinfection, achieving herd immunity through widespread exposure is very unlikely.

“We recognize there remains much for us to learn about COVID-19 transmission and immunity, but believe that such modeling can be invaluable in so-called ‘situational analyses,'” said Rohani. “Models allow stakeholders to think through the consequences of alternative courses of action.”

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Putin calls for strengthening WHO, removing obstacles for partnership in healthcare sector

The Russian leader noted that during the coronavirus pandemic there were no borders for solidarity between doctors, volunteers and people of different countries and many “countries have also been helping each other selflessly and open-heartedly”

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Russian President Vladimir Putin

UNITED NATIONS, September 23: Russian President Vladimir Putin has called for strengthening the capability of the World Health Organization (WHO) and for removing barriers for partpership in the healthcare sector.

“As to healthcare, just like in economy, we now need to remove, as many as possible, obstacles to partner relations,” said in a video address to the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday. “Our country has been actively contributing to global and regional counter-COVID-19 efforts, providing assistance to most affected states both bilaterally and within multilateral formats.”

According to the Russian leader, Moscow respects the central coordinating role of the World Health Organization. “We believe it essential to qualitatively strengthen the WHO capability. This work has already begun, and Russia is genuinely motivated to engage in it,” he said.

The Russian leader noted that during the coronavirus pandemic there were no borders for solidarity between doctors, volunteers and people of different countries and many “countries have also been helping each other selflessly and open-heartedly.”

“However, there have been cases showing the deficit of humanity and, if you will, kindness n the relations at the official inter-State level,” he said, adding that the prestige of the United Nations “could strengthen and enhance the role of the humanitarian or human component in multilateral and bilateral relations, namely in people-to-people and youth exchanges, cultural ties, social and educational programs, as well as cooperation in sports, science, technology, environment and health protection.”.

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UN must hold China accountable for unleashing Covid-19 plague onto world: Trump

Addressing the UN’s first virtual meeting of world leaders, Trump accused the Chinese government and the World Health Organization (WHO) of making a false declaration that there was no evidence of human to human transmission of Sars-Cov-2.

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Donald Trump

US president Donald Trump on Tuesday renewed his attack on China accusing it of spreading the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) in the world. He urged the United Nations to hold it accountable for “unleashing this plague onto the world.”

Addressing the UN’s first virtual meeting of world leaders, Trump accused the Chinese government and the World Health Organization (WHO) of making a false declaration that there was no evidence of human to human transmission of Sars-Cov-2, the virus that causes the deadly infection. He also said that the WHO is virtually controlled by China.

“As we pursue a bright future, we must hold accountable the nation which unleashed this plague onto the world – China,” Trump said at the 75th UNGA debate.

The US president said that in the earliest days of the outbreak, China locked down travel domestically while it continued to allow flights to leave the country and infect the rest of the world.

“China condemned my travel ban on their country, even as they cancelled domestic flights and locked citizens in their homes,” he added.

Trump again used the term “China virus” that has so far infected 31,365,633 people across the world and claimed over 965,000 lives so far.

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