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15 August, 1947, Day to feel the freshness of freedom

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Before 70 years, the day to wipe tears of years arrive
after the nation freed for the exchange of lives

 colors of blood spread a sense of unity in divesity
nation were calling for the justice after watching painful bullets graffiti

Amritsar Massacre-wefornews

Jallianwala Bagh, Amritsar

souls in death of well got peace after day reflect
The sacrifice of Bhagat singh, Sukhdev and Rajguru brought a slave ending threat

the britishers forced to accept the defeat
after the nation’s extreme will to achieve

bhagat singh-wefornews

Bhagat Singh, Sukhdev, Rajguru

the liberty to express, rule, and demand what people want
and feel the freshness of freedom that nation then can’t

The night of 15 August 1947, took away all the evils of dark
ensured the light of independence with a vow of new start.

-By Shivangi Raghav

Wefornews Bureau


The strange trio of Sex, Science and the State — and its consequences

Though her thesis is not brought out very exhaustively, she makes a fair enough case and that is enough to make this a must read — especially for ministers.



Sex and Gender

An Indian minister has made himself notorious all over social media for his comments questioning Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, but can we take this to show that the two worlds — of politics and science — are exclusive or even antagonistic? Not at all, and scientific disciplines that apparently seem farthest placed from human affairs may be the most influential.

For science has done more for setting the course of nations and their governance and economy than we can suspect — beyond its part in helping develop powerful weapons or technologies.

While this alliance of politics and science is a far more recent development than we think, it owes its genesis to botany, and two 18th century natural scientists who furthered this combination, as Patricia Fara shows in this book, part of a special set chronicling key turning points in science.

And this — in the last three decades or so of the 18th century — qualifies well enough for it shows how science progressed beyond the pastime or patronage of rich, idle noblemen to become institutionalised with government support.

And as Fara, from the History and Philosophy of Science department at Cambridge University, shows it not only saw the rather incongruous trio of the “Three Ss” — sex, science and the state — coming together with so many consequences, but also brought the subject of sex out into the public discourse, though against much opposition.

It also set in train a process — in Britain initially — that would lead a few decades later to Darwin boarding HMS Beagle to make the observations that enabled him to formulate his theory of man’s origin and development — a theory which has stood the test of time despite what some misguided or willfully ignorant politicians may think.

At the heart of this development, shows Fara’s account, were two naturalists, not as famous as Issac Newton or Darwin but contributing to science’s progress at a time “science started to become established and gain prestige”.

And both of Carl Linnaeus and Joseph Banks, along with the other Enlightenment contemporaries, “fought hard to establish that scientific knowledge was valid and valuable”.

Linnaeus was a gifted but eccentric and self-propagandising Swede whose classification system for all living organism still rules today, but raised hackles of his conservative society by using sexual parts to order flowers and using human terminology for the purpose.

Banks was his British “disciple” -turned-science administrator — and no less self-propagandising — but also managed to make “science work for the state — and the state to pay for science”. A key cameo is played by that intrepid explorer, Captain James Cook.

And in telling their story, Fara ranges over small Swedish towns and the country’s unforgiving terrain, the mansions and the seats of power of Georgian England as well as its lush countryside, hazardous voyages over uncharted oceans, encounters with uninhibited, pre-industrial societies in South Pacific islands, ambition and professional jealousy, to show how the underlying root was something more heartlessly mercenary.

For, as she contends, “scientific exploration in the Age of Reason was driven by an imperialist agenda to own, to conquer and to exploit”. But apart from the above spin-offs, there were some other positive benefits too, as she brings out. Say the way, men, especially white Europeans, began to see rest of humanity and themselves in the world, or what women could be allowed to study or not — though it would still take time before all these would be tangibly realised for all.

Along with her lucid and telling discourse on the birth of modern botany with Linnaeus and Banks — almost concurrently with its economic uses, Fara also enlivens it with a colourful account of their explorations in various climes and encounters with exotic races and, above all, the contemporary public reactions to their discoveries and doings. And this could have a thing or two to teach protesters today.

Though her thesis is not brought out very exhaustively, she makes a fair enough case and that is enough to make this a must read — especially for ministers.

By : Vikas Datta

(Vikas Datta can be contacted at [email protected]

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Poem on Pollution

For a change we had Pollution for last 42 months of diff kinds




We faced #Pollution of air for last 20 years

But that isn’t necessarily the only Pollution

For a change we had Pollution for last 42 months of diff kinds

We have #Pollution of thought

We also have #Pollution of speech

And what about #Pollution of conduct

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Poem : Paradise Lost




Once there was a leader called Modi
Whose promise of heaven sent the nation into stupor

All and sundry bought his dream of good times
The leader unmasked his shroud of deceit

What people saw was face of evil
The leader went on rampage destroyed one and all

Dreams of people turned into nightmares
Is our Paradise lost for ever?

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